An energetic approach to restoring gut function: Part 1.

Let’s kick this blog off with a question as to whether or not an energetic approach to restoring  gut function is useful when compared to over analysis? Let me clarify, that I have had my fair share of success stories with a reduced and diagnostic approach to improving gut health. Just like I have also had my fair share of kickbacks from the laboratory for recommending their tests. At one point I was using nearly 200 stool tests per year and making a little cash on the side. Many of the tests worked in isolating some specific disturbance to their gut bacteria, presence of a parasite or elevation of putrefied fatty acids. A ‘cleansing’ diet was promoted and a few supplements for good measure created some short term change whilst the client was in my care.

But here’s why the long-term approach to that type of assessment and treatment may not be the best response. A standard functional medicine approach  after spending quite a lot of cash on an integrated stool test is using the 4 R approach.

Remove (offending parties)- spend money on supplements

Restore function- spend money on supplements

Re-inoculate – spend money on nice expensive probiotics

Repair gut lining- spend money on supplements

Regurgitate. Ok the 5th one is mine but no supplements needed.

By taking this approach, an important question is not asked of the individual. Why is this person experiencing an overgrowth of bacteria/SIBO, parasitic infection, endotoxin overgrowth, inflammation and degradation of the bowel lining? I like to think that it is not because of the easy kickbacks FM practitioners are getting for the lab tests and supplements they recommend? So what is the persons level of biological energy and immune system function that allows their digestive system to get in such a state. We know there are some usual suspects. Food, stress or alcohol perhaps?

The typical gastrointestinal complaints people came to me with, were bloating, excess gas, constipation or irritated loose stools combined with poor energy. It was Ilya Mechnikov who originally stated that death starts in the bowel or colon and there’s’ certainly many degenerative and inflammatory conditions that appear at the last stop to poopy central. But is the bowel the main driver of this dysfunction? Many of the symptoms that I recalled earlier are also key symptoms of an energetic and perhaps a thyroid dysfunction. So instead of reaching for our drastic 4 R protocol with an expensive poo test lets consider the following.

 The likes of Broda Barnes and Ray Peat have highlighted how a lack of energy, either from a low or inappropriate food intake or a dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal-thyroid axis can be evaluated by assessing body temperature and the combination of pulse. Additional information on Thyroid and TSH evaluation can be found here.

Most people are aware that when they get stressed or exercise, blood is shunted away from the digestive system to the periphery and other working tissues. Even the concept of high Adreno-corticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortico releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenal production of cortisol is becoming common place in work and gym environments alike. These hormones suppress thyroid hormone and the energy compound ATP that provide energy for tissues.

It’s also well known that low energy states create tight painful muscles that are difficult to relax and one might be able to apply that line of thought to the smooth muscle tissues that regulate bowel contractility. Therefore a low energy state that does not allow for adequate energy production will not allow adequate digestion and bowel function to occur. Cold hands and feet can be a symptom of not eating enough carbohydrate and protein.

If the cold hands and feet, low body temperature, fatigue, constipation don’t resolve from eating energy rich meals that contain plenty of fruit and contains little of the foods that promote the bowel irritants histamine and serotonin (nuts, seeds, vegetable oils, grains, gluten free products, beans and pulses). Then, often factors that influence the hormones such as thyroid, estrogen and progesterone may need a deeper consideration.

I drafted a little flow chart that will be helpful for some quick strategies on what might be happening but what I would like to focus on the low energy state that might have its source from a food or hormone factor or perhaps both. Instead of using a strategy like the 4 R approach, these simple questions can help guide you to understanding whether it is the foods that you eat or an energetic factor that could be causing your digestive system to suffer. It’s not a complete algorithm but it does offer some simple solutions that have helped plenty of people resolve digestion and energy issues.

Foot note: I haven’t needed a stool test with a client for over 4 years now following this chart.

 

In part 2 I will elaborate on foods and basic supplements that can be used to resolve most long standing digestive issues and understanding other hormone actions that create digestive discord.

References:

Lokaj, J., & John, C. (2008). [Ilya Ilich Metchnikov and Paul Ehrlich: 1908 Nobel Prize winners for their research on immunity]. Epidemiologie, Mikrobiologie, Imunologie : Casopis Spolecnosti pro Epidemiologii a Mikrobiologii Ceské Lékarské Spolecnosti J.E. Purkyne, 57(4), 119–24. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19069024

Peat, R. (1997). From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in context.

Peat, R. (2006). Autonomic Systems. Retrieved from raypeat.com/articles/other/autonomic-systems.shtml

Can a bad smell create pain, dysfunction and weakness?

Over the last few years I have found that nothing ceases to amaze me when it comes to the human body. As it becomes possible to dissect systems and assess interactions of specific stimulus, observing the input/output relationship between stimulus and body.

Pain is observed to be chemical, thermal or mechanical in nature. Please bear with the technicalities before I explain the simplified mechanisms or skip to the last part of the blog, if you get bored!

There are many factors that contribute to a patient’s perception and physical feeling of pain. Pain is the central nervous systems response to an event that has the capacity to injure the tissues of the body. Nociception or pain can be qualified from the following pathways.

The ‘First’ pain is usually a withdrawal mechanism (Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflex or NRA) mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate and utilises the neospinalthalmic (new pain) tract in the anterolateral system or ALS. This typically lasts less than 0.1 of a second and the signal, suggested to be dampened in the substantia gelatinosa, an area found in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. Think about that sharp initial pain experienced causing you to move away from a stimulus, which has been detected by free nerve endings.                               Trigeminal nocicpetion/pain pathway

The ‘Second’ pain is also part of the ALS but is part of the paleospinalthalmic tract (old pain). It typically takes over from the initial first pain/neo. It is mediated by the compound substance P and can be associated with that long, lingering pain experienced from an injury.

In addition to pain, we have the capacity to assess many other features of mechanical distortion such as pressure, stretch and touch. The Dorsal Column Medial Lemniscus or DCML, allows the nervous system to provide adequate feedback to tasks and environmental stimulus.

Another part of the pain detection system is the trigeminal chemosensory system, which has nociceptive/pain and temperature pathways that feedback to cranial nerve five, called the Trigeminal nerve (CNV). When a noxious or toxic substance is processed by the neurons in the mucosal areas of the nose, mouth, eyes and lips it is relayed into the thalamus. The VPMN (or ventral posterior medial nucleus) relays signals to the sensory cortex and provides responses, such as watery eyes, sneezing and withdrawal

When we inspire air with small particles of pollutants, they pass from the lungs into the blood stream. Although the blood brain barrier is supposed to prevent any unwanted chemicals, crossing from the blood to the brain; the Circumventricular organs present an area that does not have the capacity to restrict compounds that can create dis-organisation of neurological signals entering and leaving the brain. The area postrema, also has a chemosensory role to initiate vomiting to deal with exposure to harmful compounds

So let’s have something a little easier on the eyes and brain to read now. For example:

Perhaps you are walking across the road in heavy traffic. Sucking up all the pollutants such as benzene, carbon monoxide and other waste products of burning fossil fuels into your lungs as you find your way from one side of the road to another.

For a few seconds your brain, exposed to the onslaught of pollution, has a hard time processing the compounds that have made their way into areas such as the pineal gland or chemoreceptors that can induce vomiting in response to a noxious stimulus.

You are in a rush and bump into someone, his or her shoulder hitting you firmly in the chest. It was slightly painful but you don’t really notice it, the pain pathway, along with pressure, stretch and touch receptors provided some form of feedback. The brain, perhaps still not capable of processing this feedback due to the short exposure of increased pollutants, is just trying to get on with the milieu of everything else that your body demands of it.

Meanwhile the pectoralis muscle, which is being used with each step that you take, has been exposed to increased pressure, a state of contraction or small window of pain that necessitated a withdrawal reflex. The intrafusal muscle fiber that monitor both stretch and contraction now have increased signal towards sustained contraction due to the chaos of external compounds that entered areas of the brain.

So now we might have some level of muscle dysfunction. We probably don’t even know about it. That level of muscle dysfunction now increases and decreases tension demands to receptors found in the ligaments and tendons. The joint mechanoreceptors have a different signal. The skin exteroreceptors perhaps have a different signal. There’s no pain to remind us of the event. In fact we have now gone to the gym and started doing a bunch of push-ups or gone shopping for food and simply carrying the bag home with that hand and shoulder. This doesn’t create pain, but simply sets the foundation for increased areas of dysfunction from distorted neurological signalling.

The concept of this neurological/chemical chaos is often referred to as ‘brain fog’. It seems to be in the literature for many reasons, blood sugar issues, gluten, estrogen (PMS and menopausal females are particularly susceptible) and other factors. It’s also possible that brain fog can be created from specific food stressors, once again eliciting the same response, proposed in the heavy traffic.

Some might say, how can the body be so fragile? Surely we are more robust than that? But it is possible to create these specific dysfunctions but they can be unravelled. Understanding specific stimulus can give us a solution to what dysfunction exits. We might never find out how it came about but a thorough history taking can help to influence where we assess and how to treat it. This is where a technique like P-DTR or Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex, developed by Dr Jose Palomar is unique and effective at uncovering specific neurological dysfunction.

If emotions, visual, auditory, mechanical, chemical and pain factors perpetuate dysfunction, then using those stimulus can pose an effective form of assessment and treatment.

  1. Palomar, J. Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex: Course Notes.
  2. Purves D et al Neuroscience 5th edition. Sinauer Associates 2012
  3. http://www.neurology.org/content/77/12/1198.short

Muscles, pain, hormones and other stuff.

As a therapist who works within the fields of pain, movement, energy and digestion I have seen my share of pain and muscle dysfunction in clients. As my exposure to these situations increase, I realise more than ever, that the muscles are very rarely the problem.

Specific muscle dysfunction usually boils down to spindle cell

Thyroid pic

Muscle pain and thyroid hormone

dysfunction and notably Nuclear Bag Fibres (NBF) and Nuclear chain Fibres (NCF). The primary roles of these structures are related to stretch and contraction of muscle function. There can be other factors involving neuro transmitters, involved in nocicpetion such as glutamate, utilised in the withdrawal reflex and often referred to as first pain, (also known as Neospinalthalamic tract located in the Anterolateral system or ALS) and lasting, less than a tenth of a second. Problems can arise when the following pain pathway, called second pain (or Paleospinalthalmic tract also part of the ALS) has problematic feedback with first pain, this is mediated by Bradykinin.

Further complexities arise with serotonin and other structures associated with pain such as the Amygdala and Peri Aqueductal Gray (PAG) that are beyond the scope of this short blog. However a common, over looked feature of pain, may arise with hypothyroidism .

Low thyroid function can be classified effectively with assessment of a basal temperature test and a reading of between 36.6 and 37 degrees. Most blood tests designed to measure thyroid hormones such as TSH, T3, T4 and others, often do not reflect accurate function of thyroid hormone. This is often due to feedback loops between cellular function and the Pituitary gland. Some of the regular hallmarks of hypothyroidism are poor energy, weight gain, poor sleep, hair thinning, digestive dysfunction (constipation and also alternating loose stools), cold hands and feet and pain. Here’s an old blog on thyroid and adrenalin issues.

Another assessment of thyroid function is the Achilles return reflex. When stimulating the myotactic reflex a hammer hits the Achilles tendon stimulating, the dorsi flexors or calf muscles. The response should be a quick return of the foot to it’s resting position but with low thyroid the foot returns slowly. Low thyroid output equals low ATP (Adenosine Tri Phosphate – the energy used by the mitochondria/cells). This low energy state does not allow for optimal contraction and relaxation. This is where we can see specific issues with NCF and NBF’s within the muscle spindle cell.

Muscle tendons and associated ligaments provide a feedback loop via the Golgi Tendon Organs or GTO’s. There’s potential for pre-existing GTO dysfunction to drive muscle dysfunction and vice versa. As far back as the 1960s symptoms associated with muscle disorder from low thyroid were.

* Weakness

* Cramps pain and stiffness

* Hypertrophy

* Myotonoid features.

A well-documented feature of hypothyroidism is muscular hypertrophied calf muscles and despite their size may often test weak to stimulation.

Muscle pain, may indeed not be muscle related, it may be due to many factors, suggested above and these may even be related to hormones and neurotransmitters. Many people often deal with muscle aches and pains by constantly focusing on mobility work but these structures continually return to their pre mobility work status (although this could also be an underlying stability issue). In reality there can be many factors that create dysfunction such as crude touch, vibration, nociception, Golgi, Pacini-pressure related structures and many more. But even after seeing a skilled therapist, these still don’t appear to get better, then addressing the chemical aspects of pain and function might be the next sensible thing to do.

References:

Armour Laboratories. The Thyroid Gland and Clinical Application of Medicinal Thyroid. 1945.

Ramsay I. Thyroid disease and Muscle Dysfunction. William Heinemann Medical Books. 1974.

Purves, D. et al. Medical Neuroscience. 5th Edition. Sinauer Assocates Inc. 2001

Starr, M Hypothyroidism Type II. Mark Starr Trust 2013.

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/hypothyroidism.shtml

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

I first became interested in the healing qualities of light about 5 years ago after reading From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in Context by Ray Peat. The obvious connotations to improved health during summer compared to a so- called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD was well known. The mechanics were intriguing but not limited to the obvious features of Ultra Violet light and the production of Vitamin D.

UV has been known to be problematic and excess, increases ageing of the skin but the mechanisms and links to cancer are misunderstood. An incomplete overview of other potential mechanisms that might promote mutogenic or cancerous processes are often left out of the explanation. The business of sunblock marketing, like many other fear mongering industries, continue to warn us of too much sunlight, yet often we often lack the right amount. An old blog highlights some points relating to this. The qualities of the healing properties of light are often glossed over instead of promoting the optimal rays of the sun..

The light which penetrates deeply into our tissues (mainly orange and red light) is able to improve the efficiency of energy production, and to suppress the toxic free-radicals that are always being formed in cells. “

Consideration of the healing properties of certain wavelengths of light is a must for health, metabolic and rehabilitation promotion. The useOrange and red rays of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades. In 1903 a Nobel science prize was awarded to Niels Finsen for ultraviolet-phototherapy.

Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

The use of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades.

Here are just some of the issues that have seen great improvement using LLLT and Photobiomodulation.

  • Pain reduction
  • Improved hormone function
  • Swelling reduction
  • Increased healing
  • Neurological issues
  • Improved cellular function
  • Promote recovery from exercise
  • Rehabilitation of injuries
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Improved hair follicle stimulation

The use of infra red heat lamps have been used for decades and often been recommended in rehabilitation or in the beauty world as an anti-aging protocol. I have used heat lamps with myself and clients for several years but it is clear that many gains can be had without the use of heat and just focusing on the use of light alone.

There are many factors that can make the use of light more effective and these illumination parameters include:

  • Wavelength
  • Fluence
  • Power density
  • Pulse structure
  • Timing

For many, even finding these variables may prove a difficult task. In fact even using the word Photobiomodulation becomes problematic! I think the exposure of bright light during the day through incandescent or LED lights is important to offset the lack of natural daylight and healing properties of various waveforms, (unless of course you do work or spend much of your day outside) with the use of red light after sunset to decrease impact to circadian rhythm.

One of the most prevalent mechanisms that appears to offer an explanation as to LLLT’s effectiveness is by increasing cytochrome c oxidase which improves mitochondrial function, increasing cell efficiency and function and improving energy production.

The wavelength of 600-950nm or optical window is a general guideline and appears to be where most of the research and the effects of LLLT has been conducted on. The toxinless website listed below has some great recommendations for the use of light and ideal set ups, which are very cheap to set up at home.

The use of LLLT for improving hormones and in particular thyroid function has gained a greater following of late. It’s worth noting, that in some studies which can be found on Valtsu’s website (a great resource for thyroid) , the use of LLLT improved thyroid function without the need for thyroid medication. Additional studies corroborate the effectiveness in reducing the need for thyroid medication and addressing autoimmune thyroiditis.  Therefore I think the use of LLLT for improving energy, digestion, mood and sleep is validated.

References:

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause : Female Hormones in Context. 1997.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22747309

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12804422

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26048721

Online resources:

http://valtsus.blogspot.fi/2015/09/hypothyroidism-could-it-be-treated-with.html

http://www.toxinless.com/red-light

http://www.photobiology.info/Hamblin.html

 

 

 

 

Are you using nature to regenerate?

The more clients that I see, I realise that some are very in touch with their bodies and some have no idea what is going on with it. The same rationale can be applied to those who feel the immediate value of being immersed in nature and others who are blissfully unaware of the subject matter. I often remember the change that my body used to experience as I drove out of London towards the Yorkshire Dales; as I edged past the M25 into the countryside and the journey terminated in a swathe of greenery and granite rock, the stress meter had dialled down to a zero.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So why is nature important to human body? The escalation of urbanised environments is ensuring that humans are packed into industrialised, colour lacking, banal developments, that do little to stimulate the eye and increased tension with hustle and close knit streets that people rush to and from work. This dense packing of people also accumulates a large amount of industrial pollutants, be it Benzene from car fuel, Wi-Fi (of which there is an increasing amount of literature to support it’s negative effects to hormone and cellular function) and many other factors that test the body to its limits.

There is increasing research that suggests that urbanisation is a prominent factor in rumination/negative thinking and decreasing mental health. To deal with managing aspects of mental health, exercise is often touted to be helpful as a distraction hypothesis and I don’t dispute the effectiveness of exercise training to help in this situation. A distraction is positive and exercising is essential for good health. However, how many people actually use, quiet appreciation in exercise to regenerate? We often so concerned with pushing ourselves in professional life that exercise often becomes wrapped up in the same goal setting schedules that people religiously stick to. Walking, boating, hiking and taking time to appreciate nature, take in the colours, slowly breathe in the less polluted air, listen to the birds sing, or simply sit on the beach and absorb the endless horizon of water. To often we don’t stop to take in these natural beauties as we are trying to beat those personal bests.

Studies are showing that walking for 90 minutes in a natural environment fares much better than walking in urban settings; The effects showing additional decreases in negative thinking and activity of the brain. I am a firm believer that running and cycling in built up areas may make you fitter but probably less healthier. Increased oxidation of pollutants in urbanised areas, contribute to health issues and mortality rates are on the rise. Training efficiently and smart would warrant that we should aim to exercise less in this manner. Walking in green spaces and utilising the stress decreasing mechanisms of nature, may have more impact to your health than running or cycling on by without appreciating the spaces surrounding you.

Life seems to be whizzing by faster than ever, isn’t it time we slowed down to appreciate it more? Train for strength, walk for health?

References:

Working with Amna

In the past few months I have had the pleasure of working with Amna Al Haddad. She is a motivated, strong woman with a goal of training for the 2016 Olympics in Rio. When I first met Amna she was a little disappointed with her progress and felt like she had hit a wall with her training.

Initially the goal was to tweak her energy levels by analysing her metabolic rate and modifying diet to get the optimal amount of energy, to improve performance. When people participate at high level sports they can often become very strong through compensatory mechanisms. Using bio-mechanical assessments and motor control evaluations such as SFMA and Neuro Kinetic Therapy, we were able to change the way that Amna’s nervous system communicated with the appropriate muscles and present some strategies that kept them optimal.

Understanding the difference between mobility versus stability issues is key.This ensures that movement remains great and injuries are reduced.

It’s been great to see Amna hit some new PB’s and stay motivated for her goals ahead. Really looking forward to see her excel over the next few years as it has been a pleasure working with someone so motivated to achieve their targets.

Amna’s face book page 

“Working with Keith in the past few months have been absolutely great. My performance, energy levels, and stability definitely increased after our treatment sessions. My muscles have been compensating a lot, often causing a lot of dysfunction and irritation that has affected my weightlifting and strength levels.Keith understands the human body in a different way than what I have seen before from a performance consultant; he can immediately show you how to activate a muscle and restore its strength, reduce pain, and more in just a few seconds! BUT..you have to do your homework to reinforce the new movement patterns.” 
Amna Al Haddad, UAE national Olympic Weightlifter

 

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Getting to the core and why you have back pain despite rock hard abs!

The concept of ‘core’ conditioning has evolved significantly since the millennium and there have often been some common misunderstandings of the mechanisms, which can increase the prevalence of back pain. I know because I taught them in an inappropriate way, that’s the way that I was taught. But times change and increased knowledge and application go a long way for someone to determine what works and what doesn’t. Many people still have back pain despite participation in core conditioning regimes, pilates and other types of ‘core’ workouts.

Many lay peoples understanding of the core is that a strong set of abdominal and back muscles prevents back pain. This statement is false and I have seen hundreds of people with strong trunk muscles all still prevent with back pain. Overtraining of the core is responsible for increasing back pain in many individuals. Many focus on strength, skipping key elements such as flexibility and stability paving the way for muscular dysfunction. Neuromuscular retraining should often be the focus for optimal core function but for many throwing big weights around, worrying about weight loss or how many spin classes they can get to takes precedence over dysfunctional movement and pain .

Then there is the concept of the inner unit which was touted by Richardson, Jull and Hodges, a good book and one that was part of the curriculum at the CHEK Institute (where I learnt a lot about rehabilitation) and no doubt many other institutions and how, by isolation of the Transversus Abdominus or TrA created an increase in Intra-Abdominal Pressure (IAP) co contracted with the multifidus and worked intrinsically with the pelvic floor.

Training the TrA in isolation fails to offer the complete picture and treatment for segmental stability. The diaphragm working in co-contraction with the TrA, pelvic floor and lumbar multifidus present a more appropriate method for stabilising not only the lumbar spine but provide a foundation for a more efficient methodology of rehabilitation which covers stability.

The Rehabilitation School of Prague’s model of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilisation offers a compelling model of stabilisation via developmental kinesiology. How the developing child moves and integrates stability is an effective method for re-integration of the intrinsic stabilisation system which comprises of the diaphragm, pelvic floor, TrA and spine flexors and extensors. The image below of the open scissors position of the rib cage and pelvis details the oblique angle that can occur when poor stability is mediated by poor diaphragmatic action.

why you get back pain, DNS

With DNS technique the flare of the rib cage and optimal contraction of the diaphragm can be corrected in the space of minutes to provide an optimal pathway for diaphragmatic breathing.

This concept is an effective method for rehabilitation but in my opinion there remain questions when utilising the concept of stability from the trunk. The diaphragm has the capacity to work segmentally too much or too little based upon a client’s injury history. Here are just some of many scenarios where the intrinsic stabilising system could become dysfunctional.

• TMJ or jaw dysfunction
• C section or other significant scars on the body
• Pelvic floor dysfunction
• Any other muscles has the capacity to affect any other muscle in the body.
• Local inhibition of synergistic, functional opposites or stabilising muscles
• Emotional distress
• Broken bones
• Functional slings such as the posterior oblique sling, lateral sling and others
Why you get neck pain

Use of a joint by joint approach to testing such as Neuro Kinetic Therapy ™ helps to establish a baseline for dysfunctional patterns of facilitation (overworked muscles) and inhibition (underworking muscles). Decisions should be made as whether a mobility or a motor control issue exist. Motor control or the ability of the muscles to be efficiently recruited by the nervous system can be rectified by understanding patterns of inhibition and rewiring the nervous system for optimal control. Integration between both NKT and DNS techniques allows for a progression from pain and dysfunction to integrated movement patterns that can be hard wired with practice of developmental kinesiology exercises.

Many traditional and rehabilitation conditioning exercises often serve to increase dysfunction. Extension and even neutral load training based exercises such as deadlifts, bird dogs and horse stances can increase activation of the thoracolumbar fascia which serves as a conduit for force transfer especially for the posterior oblique sling.
index

A release of the thorocolumbar fascia and integration of the posterior oblique sling through proprioception via taping or exercises remains an efficient method of neuro muscular activation rather than just increasing motor activity via strength and conditioning exercises. tape Posterior oblique sling and reducing back pain

Integration of techniques allows for a much more efficient treatment for clients who suffer from pain and movement dysfunction and can truly get to the core of both acute and chronic conditions. Isolated approaches yield isolated results.

To find out more about how to get out of pain and improve movement and energy please get in touch.

References:

Frank, C Kobesova, A and Kolar, P.Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilisation and Sports Therapy.Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2013 February; 8(1): 62–73.
Myers, T. Anatomy Trains. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. 2001.
Richardson C, Hodges P and Hides, J. Therapeutic Lumbo Pelvic Stabilisation. Churchill Livingstone. 1999
Weinstock, D. Nuero Kinetic Therapy. An Innovative Approach to Muscle Testing. North Atlantic Books.

Old injuries and new pain?

Image-1 (2)

Most people don’t associate long term injuries that are often asymptomatic with current levels of pain. This single case study is a great way of demonstrating just how this can occur.

Brief history of client-34 year old rugby player presenting with recurrent achilles pain despite long term physio. A great case of lifitis as somebody reminded me about my own injuries recently! Two ruptured biceps over the last decade and neck injuries to boot. Presented with inhibited bilateral hamstrings, right lat, neck extensors and left rectus femoris and quadricep (hip and thigh muscles) inhibited. Also poor dorsi flexion (raising the foot from the floor) inhibited by his calf muscles. His thoroca-lumbar fascia, the piece of tissue that connects the glutes and lats was holding a lot of tension and contributing to a poor link between these two powerful muscles.

Compensation can take many forms. For example with this case the client was usiing his diaphragm to help stabilise other joints in his body that was not balanced with the pelvic floor and TVA (transversus abdominis or hoop like muscle that is a key player in spinal and segmental stability)

After testing and re-activating the muscles that were inhibited using NKT (TM) the muscles, I taped the right to left posterior oblique sling as you can see in the picture, with great results. The tape acts as a conduit for proprioception or communication between this key sling. Client has been free of achilles pain despite training heavily during pre season rugby training.tape Posterior oblique sling

Analysis in the form of SFMA selective functional movement assessment and re-establishing neural pathways through the use of NKT, appropriate treatment and exercise have ensured that this client got out of pain most effectively and the interesting part…I didn’t touch his heel to get rid of the pain! To find out how to get pain free, moving and grooving get in touch to find out more.

Is your technique driving your injuries

Image-1

Training the classics like deadlifts and squats are an integral part of training and getting strong. More often than not we tend to sacrifice key parts of our body like a sacrificial lamb to the slaughter, inviting injury with each rep. One of the most common things that I see with clients deadlifting and injuries, is the drive with the neck in a fully extended position, which is shown above.

Using a body part to drive a movement isn’t detrimental and as the motor control command is executed it has to start somehwere but extending the cervical spine shifts the emphasis on the kinetic chain. As the Cervical extensors are fully contracted, the whole extensor chain has to ensure that all the work is completed whilst a fully extended position is held. Short tight cervical extensors are a common finding in many people and their recruitment/facilitation and inhibition with many factors can be linked with issues in the calf and plantar fascia of the feet.

You will notice in the picture below as theorised by Myers and others that the superficial back line is a complete chain from head to toe. Facilitation of the cervical extensors can contribute to forward head posture and postural changes in the thoracic spine, shoulder and lower down the chain. Instead of creating injury hotspots, keeping the neck in a more aligned neutral throughout the lift and using the eyes to drive into extension can help alleviate the problems associated with facilitated neck muscles.

Image-1 (3)