How to improve sleep-wake cycles.

Do you need to improve sleep? Why is it that sometimes, with the best intentions of going to bed early, we either find ourselves struggling to enter a sleep cycle, or wake up, deep in the hours of darkness? The prominent stress researcher Robert Sapolsky (Why Zebras don’t Get Ulcers) writes fondly of his near death experiences, of little sleep from the arrival of his newborn child.

It’s no surprise that security and intelligence operatives use a lack of sleep to disorientate prisoners. Just one nights lack of sleep from me and I will tell you anything! Despite the will to nod off, why is it that many people suffered from poor sleep, or struggle to enter sleep cycles?

Before I delve into some brief hormonal issues that can be manipulated to ensure a deeper sleep it’s worth noting that darkness itself is a stressful experience and we produce many restorative hormones during sleep to combat the metabolic stress of darkness. Therefore one essential component of adequate sleep is exposure to sunlight on a daily basis. This ensures uptake of vitamin D and exposure to the deeper penetrative orange and red lights, which help to restore metabolism and healing of cells. An old blog on light therapy.

Over the years I have found the following issues associated with poor sleep.

  • Low blood sugar levels
  • Increase in compounds of wakefulness
  • Exercise late at night
  • Excessive work stress/blue light exposure
  • Exposure to EMF-electromagnetic stress and Wi-Fi
  • Poor sleep and its vicious cycle
  • Emotional Stress

There are several models to be aware of when it comes to sleep theory and the phases of sleep are categorised as

NREM – Non rapid eye movement- pre REM sleep.

REM – Rapid eye movement- this is the deep restorative part of sleep
Active wake

Neurotransmitters and hormones associated with sleep:

Acetylcholine – AcH is the neurotransmitter associated with Rapid Eye Movement or REM sleep.

Serotonin – 5HT this neurotransmitter along with HA is associated with wakefulness.

Norepinephrine/Noreadrenaline – Ne – Hormone of wakefulness.

Gammaminobutyric Acid – GABA. GABA’s role in sleep is well documented but levels vary depending on location of the brain. It’s role is known in decreasing wakefulness and also decreasing deeper REM sleep and involved in producing wakefulness.
Histamine- HA involved in wakefulness.

Hypocretin Orexin- PCT /O Involved in wakefulness.

Adenosine- AD involved in entering NREM sleep.

Here is a rough depiction of key Neurotransmitters of REM and NREM sleep. Other neurotransmitters of wakefulness such as Histamine, Serotonin and noreadenaline (hormone) are not depicted but are elevated in waking state and should be lower during sleep cycles. It’s worth noting that the use of serotonin in mood related disorders such as depression is a key agent in insomnia like states.

sleep neurotransmitters

 

Common sleep disorders

Insomnia:  The inability to sleep restfully and I would categorise a good nights sleep from 6-9 hours depending on your own needs. The ability to enter deep sleep is dependant on many factors such as hormones, neurotransmitters, stress and available energy. It’s worth noting that the regenerative aspects of REM sleep and brain function have been shown to use as much glucose as when awake. Maintaining adequate available energy is key to getting sound-nights sleep.

Sleep apnoea: inability to enter REM sleep due to issues associated with optimal breathing. Obesity and sleep apnoea do seem to correlate and there is a suggestion of structural abnormalities in a small section of people.

The role of sleep in disease prevention

Sleep’s role in psychiatric disorders, depression, metabolic disease and addiction are well documented. A key feature of a lack of sleep, besides on-going fatigue and failure to regenerate is the elevation of adrenalin and cortisol. Elevated levels of cortisol are well known to decrease thyroid function, which can have a significant effect on levels of circulating thyroid hormone and energy production (key to regulation of sleep). The mechanism can tie in with its pervasive actions on management of blood sugar levels. Another noted effect from sleep loss is that we tend to overeat more when tired, which could impact weight gain (and if thyroid is part of the vicious cycle, weight loss becomes increasingly difficult).

Lack of quality sleep can therefore be responsible for an increasing amount of deleterious conditions, such as hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity, other hormone dys-regulation and cardiovascular disease. Ascertaining whether the issue initially stems from a hormone imbalance can be key in resolving sleep wake issues.

Drugs

There are a variety of drugs on the market that help to improve onset of sleep, however if you seek to improve the biological mechanisms of sleep and perhaps look to the list suggested below, you may find that your sleep improves, without the need for medication.

Cognitive behavioural therapy

The role of CBT in reducing Insomnia has shown effective results even more so than prescriptive medications. Whilst the treatment is not determined whether it effectively targets the mechanics of insomnia its success suggests provides a more desirable approach than long term insomnia medication.

What can you do?

  • Understand the link between production of inflammatory neurotransmitters such as Histamine and Serotonin and seek to lower them. This may be through diet adjustment or exposure to problematic chemicals/hormones.
  • If you get to sleep but wake up, this may be due to poor available energy. Maybe from a low carb diet, low thyroid function and poor production of energy. You may find having something light like a glass of milk with honey, or fruit juice with gelatin may help out. Salt also helps to decrease adrenalin production
  • Wi-Fi, blue light exposure, electromagnetic stress all play their part in interfering with stress and how the cells function. Stopping their use several hours before sleep can help. Do turn off Wi-Fi in house and no phones or electric devices by your bed.
  • Avoid stimulus such as caffeine or exercise in the evening, if you have sleep issues. Caffeine decreases production of adenosine.
  • If under emotional stress, a slow walk before bed may be a useful idea combined with ensuring adequate blood sugar levels are met.

References:

Neurobiology of Sleep. Course notes. Duke University. 2015.

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause. Female Hormones in Context. 1997

Sapolsky R. Why Zebras don’t get Ulcers. St Martins Griffin. 1998

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941414/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3443758/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27091535

 

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