Therapy

A biochemical approach to decreasing muscle pain with food and hormones.

 pain and hormones

pain and hormones

A biochemical approach to decreasing muscle pain is often the last place most people look and that includes many pain specialists. Modulating pain and hormones through food and other variables can create some impressive results. Aches and pains are a common theme in every day living. Some people seek to push themselves harder with excessive training schedules, others spend more time in a seated position and other factors contribute to tissue not responding the way that it should. Pain and the concept of nociception is a system of feedback for the body that is protective in essence. You touch something you shouldn’t; first pain kicks in to remove you from the painful stimulus (lasts less than 0.1 seconds), after that and depending on severity of damage second pain kicks in.

First pain and second pain (both reside in the anterolateral system or ALS) utilise different chemical messengers and another factor for this form of feedback is that other nociceptive factors like touch, visual, auditory and other sensations of stress can be part of the problematic feedback if not resolved. All of these have the capacity to interrupt optimal motor control and functioning of joints and soft tissues and affect hormone profiles. Even a bad smell can create neurological chaos.

Another less well known aspect (in therapy based settings) of disruptive function in muscle tissue are the effects of hormones that may lead to decreased feed back and be responsible for pain. Hypothyroidism affects muscle tissue via energy and neurological deficiencies.

Hypothyroidism results in

Slower peripheral and central nerve conduction velocity Lower body temperature is a factor creating slowed velocity Decreased active cell transport in the cerebral cortex Decreased flux of sodium and calcium for contraction/relaxation Poor production of energy for contraction/relaxation Decreases depolarisation of action potential

 cold body

cold body

In a nutshell a colder, slower body leads to a decreased   coordinated body that has a hard time contracting and relaxing muscle tissue. This can lead to increased incidence of injury and pain.

A slowed heart rate is a sign of hypothyroidism and the bradychardia (slowed heart rate) should serve the purpose of describing the decreased rate of function throughout all muscle tissue. Thyroid hormone can improve both rate of contraction and relaxation in both fast and slow twitch muscles but also exerts a cardio protective role on blood vessels and bowel function via smooth muscle tissue. The documented symptoms of hypertension and constipation along with the neuromuscular actions tend to resolve with adequate thyroid hormone (Gao, Zhang, Zhang, Yang, & Chen, 2013).

Prior to initiating thyroid therapy it’s essential to rule out functionally hypothyroid states induced by diet, stress, excess exercise and other environmental factors. Many clients often present with lowered temperature, with cold hands, feet and nose, altered bowel, sleep and emotional function, which can often be resolved with appropriate energy and decreased intestinal irritants.

Chronic pain increases cortisol production which decreases thyroid hormone production (Samuels & McDaniel, 1997) as does fasting or calorie restriction which induces a decrease in available T3 (thyroid hormone) (Hulbert, 2000).

This gives us two approaches 1) to reduce pain with appropriate therapy and to ensure that adequate energy modulates the suppression of excess cortisol and increases available thyroid for tissue organisation and recovery.

Hormones also affect tendons; diabetics and poor insulin profiles appear to create disorganised tendon structure but this may be a factor related to decreased available thyroid hormone. Hypothyroidism decreases available T3 within tendons, which can decrease growth, structure, and collagen production and create hypoxia of tissue leading to calcification.

Estrogen, although necessary for growth of tissue can often be found in excess creating problematic growth. Estrogen is also well known to decrease thyroid hormone and can provide an explanation why more females then men tend to be hypothyroid. The decrease in both thyroid hormone and progesterone can increase muccopolysacharides, which increase pressure in tissues, creating puffy, oedema like states. The swelling can be linked to many pain states which include carpal tunnel, which can be resolved with progesterone and thyroid in the absence of physical therapy. Progesterone also appears to induce myelination of nerves (surrounds and allows nerve conduction) and decreases inflammation (Milani et al 2010).

Energy production remains  a most potent form of therapy for decreasing pain, optimising rehabilitation and restoring tissue function.

References:

  1. Gao, N., Zhang, W., Zhang, Y., Yang, Q., & Chen, S. (2013). Carotid intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism: A meta-analysis. Atherosclerosis, 227(1), 18–25. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.070

  2. Hulbert, A. (2000). Thyroid hormones and their effects: a new perspective. Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 75(4), 519–631. http://doi.org/10.1017/S146479310000556X

  3. Milani, P., Mondelli, M., Ginanneschi, F., Mazzocchio, R., & Rossi, A. (2010). Progesterone - new therapy in mild carpal tunnel syndrome? Study design of a randomized clinical trial for local therapy. Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury, 5(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/1749-7221-5-11

  4. http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aging-estrogen-progesterone.shtml

  5. Samuels, M. H., & McDaniel, P. A. (1997). Thyrotropin levels during hydrocortisone infusions that mimic fasting- induced cortisol elevations: A clinical research center study. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 82(11), 3700–3704. http://doi.org/10.1210/jcem.82.11.4376

Can a bad smell create pain, dysfunction and weakness?

We know about the feedback of pain and painful stimulus (nociception) and the creation of pain to warn us but what about the effects of noxious and more subtle smells on the nervous system? Over the last few years I have found that nothing ceases to amaze me when it comes to the human body. As it becomes possible to dissect systems and assess interactions of specific stimulus, observing the input/output relationship between stimulus and body. Pain stimulus is observed to be chemical, thermal or mechanical in nature. Please bear with the technicalities before I explain the simplified mechanisms or skip to the last part of the blog, if you get bored!

There are many factors that contribute to a patient’s perception and physical feeling of pain. Pain is the central nervous systems response to an event that has the capacity to injure the tissues of the body. Nociception or pain can be qualified from the following pathways.

The ‘First’ pain is usually a withdrawal mechanism (Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflex or NRA) mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate and utilises the neospinalthalmic (new pain) tract in the anterolateral system or ALS. This typically lasts less than 0.1 of a second and the signal, suggested to be dampened in the substantia gelatinosa, an area found in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. Think about that sharp initial pain experienced causing you to move away from a stimulus, which has been detected by free nerve endings.                               Smelly pain

The ‘Second’ pain is also part of the ALS but is part of the paleospinalthalmic tract (old pain). It typically takes over from the initial first pain/neo. It is mediated by the compound substance P and can be associated with that long, lingering pain experienced from an injury.

In addition to pain, we have the capacity to assess many other features of mechanical distortion such as pressure, stretch and touch. The Dorsal Column Medial Lemniscus or DCML, allows the nervous system to provide adequate feedback to tasks and environmental stimulus.

Another part of the pain detection system is the trigeminal chemosensory system, which has nociceptive/pain and temperature pathways that feedback to cranial nerve five, called the Trigeminal nerve (CNV). When a noxious or toxic substance is processed by the neurons in the mucosal areas of the nose, mouth, eyes and lips it is relayed into the thalamus. The VPMN (or ventral posterior medial nucleus) relays signals to the sensory cortex and provides responses, such as watery eyes, sneezing and withdrawal

When we inspire air with small particles of pollutants, they pass from the lungs into the blood stream. Although the blood brain barrier is supposed to prevent any unwanted chemicals, crossing from the blood to the brain; the Circumventricular organs present an area that does not have the capacity to restrict compounds that can create dis-organisation of neurological signals entering and leaving the brain. The area postrema, also has a chemosensory role to initiate vomiting to deal with exposure to harmful compounds

So let’s have something a little easier on the eyes and brain to read now. For example:

Perhaps you are walking across the road in heavy traffic. Sucking up all the pollutants such as benzene, carbon monoxide and other waste products of burning fossil fuels into your lungs as you find your way from one side of the road to another.

For a few seconds your brain, exposed to the onslaught of pollution, has a hard time processing the compounds that have made their way into areas such as the pineal gland or chemoreceptors that can induce vomiting in response to a noxious stimulus.

You are in a rush and bump into someone, his or her shoulder hitting you firmly in the chest. It was slightly painful but you don’t really notice it, the pain pathway, along with pressure, stretch and touch receptors provided some form of feedback. The brain, perhaps still not capable of processing this feedback due to the short exposure of increased pollutants, is just trying to get on with the milieu of everything else that your body demands of it.

Meanwhile the pectoralis muscle, which is being used with each step that you take, has been exposed to increased pressure, a state of contraction or small window of pain that necessitated a withdrawal reflex. The intrafusal muscle fiber that monitor both stretch and contraction now have increased signal towards sustained contraction due to the chaos of external compounds that entered areas of the brain.

So now we might have some level of muscle dysfunction. We probably don’t even know about it. That level of muscle dysfunction now increases and decreases tension demands to receptors found in the ligaments and tendons. The joint mechanoreceptors have a different signal. The skin exteroreceptors perhaps have a different signal. There’s no pain to remind us of the event. In fact we have now gone to the gym and started doing a bunch of push-ups or gone shopping for food and simply carrying the bag home with that hand and shoulder. This doesn’t create pain, but simply sets the foundation for increased areas of dysfunction from distorted neurological signalling.

The concept of this neurological/chemical chaos is often referred to as ‘brain fog’. It seems to be in the literature for many reasons, blood sugar issues, gluten, estrogen (PMS and menopausal females are particularly susceptible) and other factors. It’s also possible that brain fog can be created from specific food stressors, once again eliciting the same response, proposed in the heavy traffic.

Some might say, how can the body be so fragile? Surely we are more robust than that? But it is possible to create these specific dysfunctions but they can be unravelled. Understanding specific stimulus can give us a solution to what dysfunction exits. We might never find out how it came about but a thorough history taking can help to influence where we assess and how to treat it. This is where a technique like P-DTR or Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex, developed by Dr Jose Palomar is unique and effective at uncovering specific neurological dysfunction.

If emotions, visual, auditory, mechanical, chemical and pain factors perpetuate dysfunction, then using those stimulus can pose an effective form of assessment and treatment.

  1. Palomar, J. Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex: Course Notes.
  2. Purves D et al Neuroscience 5th edition. Sinauer Associates 2012
  3. http://www.neurology.org/content/77/12/1198.short

How to improve sleep-wake cycles.

Do you need to improve sleep? Why is it that sometimes, with the best intentions of going to bed early, we either find ourselves struggling to enter a sleep cycle, or wake up, deep in the hours of darkness? The prominent stress researcher Robert Sapolsky (Why Zebras don’t Get Ulcers) writes fondly of his near death experiences, of little sleep from the arrival of his newborn child. It’s no surprise that security and intelligence operatives use a lack of sleep to disorientate prisoners. Just one nights lack of sleep from me and I will tell you anything! Despite the will to nod off, why is it that many people suffered from poor sleep, or struggle to enter sleep cycles?

Before I delve into some brief hormonal issues that can be manipulated to ensure a deeper sleep it’s worth noting that darkness itself is a stressful experience and we produce many restorative hormones during sleep to combat the metabolic stress of darkness. Therefore one essential component of adequate sleep is exposure to sunlight on a daily basis. This ensures uptake of vitamin D and exposure to the deeper penetrative orange and red lights, which help to restore metabolism and healing of cells. An old blog on light therapy.

Over the years I have found the following issues associated with poor sleep.

  • Low blood sugar levels
  • Increase in compounds of wakefulness
  • Exercise late at night
  • Excessive work stress/blue light exposure
  • Exposure to EMF-electromagnetic stress and Wi-Fi
  • Poor sleep and its vicious cycle
  • Emotional Stress

There are several models to be aware of when it comes to sleep theory and the phases of sleep are categorised as

NREM – Non rapid eye movement- pre REM sleep.

REM - Rapid eye movement- this is the deep restorative part of sleep Active wake

Neurotransmitters and hormones associated with sleep:

Acetylcholine – AcH is the neurotransmitter associated with Rapid Eye Movement or REM sleep.

Serotonin – 5HT this neurotransmitter along with HA is associated with wakefulness.

Norepinephrine/Noreadrenaline - Ne - Hormone of wakefulness.

Gammaminobutyric Acid – GABA. GABA’s role in sleep is well documented but levels vary depending on location of the brain. It’s role is known in decreasing wakefulness and also decreasing deeper REM sleep and involved in producing wakefulness. Histamine- HA involved in wakefulness.

Hypocretin Orexin- PCT /O Involved in wakefulness.

Adenosine- AD involved in entering NREM sleep.

Here is a rough depiction of key Neurotransmitters of REM and NREM sleep. Other neurotransmitters of wakefulness such as Histamine, Serotonin and noreadenaline (hormone) are not depicted but are elevated in waking state and should be lower during sleep cycles. It’s worth noting that the use of serotonin in mood related disorders such as depression is a key agent in insomnia like states.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common sleep disorders

Insomnia:  The inability to sleep restfully and I would categorise a good nights sleep from 6-9 hours depending on your own needs. The ability to enter deep sleep is dependant on many factors such as hormones, neurotransmitters, stress and available energy. It’s worth noting that the regenerative aspects of REM sleep and brain function have been shown to use as much glucose as when awake. Maintaining adequate available energy is key to getting sound-nights sleep.

Sleep apnoea: inability to enter REM sleep due to issues associated with optimal breathing. Obesity and sleep apnoea do seem to correlate and there is a suggestion of structural abnormalities in a small section of people.

The role of sleep in disease prevention

Sleep's role in psychiatric disorders, depression, metabolic disease and addiction are well documented. A key feature of a lack of sleep, besides on-going fatigue and failure to regenerate is the elevation of adrenalin and cortisol. Elevated levels of cortisol are well known to decrease thyroid function, which can have a significant effect on levels of circulating thyroid hormone and energy production (key to regulation of sleep). The mechanism can tie in with its pervasive actions on management of blood sugar levels. Another noted effect from sleep loss is that we tend to overeat more when tired, which could impact weight gain (and if thyroid is part of the vicious cycle, weight loss becomes increasingly difficult).

Lack of quality sleep can therefore be responsible for an increasing amount of deleterious conditions, such as hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity, other hormone dys-regulation and cardiovascular disease. Ascertaining whether the issue initially stems from a hormone imbalance can be key in resolving sleep wake issues.

Drugs

There are a variety of drugs on the market that help to improve onset of sleep, however if you seek to improve the biological mechanisms of sleep and perhaps look to the list suggested below, you may find that your sleep improves, without the need for medication.

Cognitive behavioural therapy

The role of CBT in reducing Insomnia has shown effective results even more so than prescriptive medications. Whilst the treatment is not determined whether it effectively targets the mechanics of insomnia its success suggests provides a more desirable approach than long term insomnia medication.

What can you do?

  • Understand the link between production of inflammatory neurotransmitters such as Histamine and Serotonin and seek to lower them. This may be through diet adjustment or exposure to problematic chemicals/hormones.
  • If you get to sleep but wake up, this may be due to poor available energy. Maybe from a low carb diet, low thyroid function and poor production of energy. You may find having something light like a glass of milk with honey, or fruit juice with gelatin may help out. Salt also helps to decrease adrenalin production
  • Wi-Fi, blue light exposure, electromagnetic stress all play their part in interfering with stress and how the cells function. Stopping their use several hours before sleep can help. Do turn off Wi-Fi in house and no phones or electric devices by your bed.
  • Avoid stimulus such as caffeine or exercise in the evening, if you have sleep issues. Caffeine decreases production of adenosine.
  • If under emotional stress, a slow walk before bed may be a useful idea combined with ensuring adequate blood sugar levels are met.

References:

Neurobiology of Sleep. Course notes. Duke University. 2015.

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause. Female Hormones in Context. 1997

Sapolsky R. Why Zebras don’t get Ulcers. St Martins Griffin. 1998

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941414/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3443758/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27091535

 

If you can’t rotate, just wait…for the injury.

Rotation is one of the most important motions that humans have in their repertoire of locomotion. After stabilisation of the neck, chest and pelvis is achieved at the age of 4-5 months, a baby develops the ability to rotate from supine to prone and back and then progress to four-point, quadrapedal and then verticalisation before the monumental task of gait is achieved. So if rotation is one of the first components of movement and locomotion that we establish, it would also appear to be one of the first movements that we tend to lose as we develop dysfunctional or habitual movement.

Why does this happen? Or A question that I am often posed by my clients. How did I get to be like this? I would offer the following scenarios:

  • Too much exercise- focus on sagittal plane or backwards and forwards motion.
  • Too little exercise – stuck at a desk-sofa, inability to breathe, lack of movement.

For the committed exerciser a lack of rotation or the lack of reprogramming of rotation is often key. The neck and thoracic spine were built for rotation. Squats, deadlifts, pull ups, benching, Olympic lifting and other exercises do little to improve rotation. Even if a good trainer implements some great rotational exercisers such as wood-chops, cable push or pulls with rotation, med-ball tosses and the like, the action of creating an optimal rotation pattern is hard to achieve without some form of neuro-biomechanical re-programming. In short:

MORE DOES NOT MEAN BETTER

Understanding how good rotation (and frontal plane or side to side mechanics) looks like and how to reprogram it, should be considered by those wanting to improve mechanics or to move away from sources out of pain but of course a lack of rotation is not the only cause of pain and or altered mechanics. Regional interdependence is a concept that suggests that poor movement and pain in one area may be the product of another seemingly unrelated area.

So what’s good?

As always depending on your slant opinions can vary. I tend to use mechanical analysis such as SFMA (Selective Functional Movement Analysis), combined with some other biomechanical considerations such as, DNS, gait and to change the clients patterns I use techniques such as Neuro Kinetic Therapy and Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Release or PDTR for efficient results.

Here’s a quick way to analyse rotation.

Standing

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe standing position observes a ground up view of rotation. In short it helps to breakdown issues related to mobility or stability. What you are looking for is approximately 45-50 degrees of rotation at the hip and pelvis and 90 degrees of rotation of the upper body. It should be compared with the other side

 

 

 

 

Seated

ComplOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAeting  the test seated with the feet on the ground allows for an assessment of rotation of the upper body minus involvement of the lower body to determine interactions. In short an approximate rotation of 50 degrees either side is ideal. Unilateral differences should be compared as part of the treatment strategy.

Is it a mobility or stability issue? An old vid blog can you up to date on this concept. 

Rolling.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe rolling pattern is a great leveller for the athlete and non athlete alike. The concept is to assess the ability to roll using only upper body or lower body, analysing segmental movement and in most cases many people cannot adequately roll.

In fact the compensation strategies can reveal much about how an individuals brain has elected to move with compensatory mechanisms. Correcting these can be achieved with NKT and PDTR in the space of a few minutes in some cases.

Rolling patterns represent one of the first forms of locomotion in the neonate and initial rolling patterns starts at the age of 4-5 months.

Rolling assessment allows for the identification of muscles/structures that may contribute to poor rotation in gait, day - day and sporting activities.

Comparing upper to lower body and prone to supine can determine deficits that can be rectified in both pain and optimisation of movement.

  • Upper body prone to supine left to right
  • Upper body supine to prone left to right
  • Lower body prone to supine left to right
  • Lower body supine to prone left to right

 When we lose efficient rotation in everyday activities such as walking and running, structures that may not be able to rotate efficiently may be forced into compensatory movement. For instance, the lumbar spine which has minimal degrees of rotation when compared to the thoracic spine can often be the source of pain

Integrating rotation into your exercise and injury prevention routine should be as important as your warm up itself. If you feel that you can’t rotate that well then get in contact with someone who can assess and change your rotation.

You can find out more in my breathing pattern and core workshop coming up soon called The Foundational Five about how to change core function.

 References:

  • Cook, G. et al. Selective Functional Movement Assessment. Course Manual
  • Kobesova, A., Kolar, P., Developmental kinesiology: Three levels of motor control in the assessment and treatment of the motor system, Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies (2013),
  • Weinstock, D. Neuro Kinetic Therapy.
  • Cook, G. Gill, L. Hoogenbam, Voight M. Using Rolling to Develop Neuromuscular Control and Coordination of the Core and Extremities of Athletes. N Am J Sports Phys Ther. May 2009; 4(2): 70–82.

 

 

 

 

 

The difference between mobility and stability issues

Do you have an injury that keeps reoccurring? Finding the difference between mobility and stability issues can be the key to eradicating pain for good If you have ever suffered from an injury and there was no difference made between a mobility or a stability issue. Chances are you may still have the injury.

You often see many trainers and therapists focusing on mobility, mobility and more mobility. Release this muscle with that foam roller release the fascia with this ball but unless the distinction is made between whether a mobility drill or stability training or re-programming of the nervous system needs to occur, All you will end up with is one mobile injured body. It’s a simple thing to do. Just determine whether the movement can be conducted through the desired range. If it can’t, the question should be asked can this be done passively, with someone else guiding you through the movement. If the answer is yes. You have a stability or motor control dysfunction.

If you are the one of many going through the insurance/treatment mill or simply not getting any resolve from massage, exercise or whatever therapy that you are undertaking. Don’t be scared to ask the person treating you…Do I have a mobility or stability issue? It will help to cut through all the fluff. .

Getting to the core and why you have back pain despite rock hard abs!

The concept of ‘core’ conditioning has evolved significantly since the millennium and there have often been some common misunderstandings of the mechanisms, which can increase the prevalence of back pain. I know because I taught them in an inappropriate way, that’s the way that I was taught. But times change and increased knowledge and application go a long way for someone to determine what works and what doesn’t. Many people still have back pain despite participation in core conditioning regimes, pilates and other types of 'core' workouts. Many lay peoples understanding of the core is that a strong set of abdominal and back muscles prevents back pain. This statement is false and I have seen hundreds of people with strong trunk muscles all still prevent with back pain. Overtraining of the core is responsible for increasing back pain in many individuals. Many focus on strength, skipping key elements such as flexibility and stability paving the way for muscular dysfunction. Neuromuscular retraining should often be the focus for optimal core function but for many throwing big weights around, worrying about weight loss or how many spin classes they can get to takes precedence over dysfunctional movement and pain .

Then there is the concept of the inner unit which was touted by Richardson, Jull and Hodges, a good book and one that was part of the curriculum at the CHEK Institute (where I learnt a lot about rehabilitation) and no doubt many other institutions and how, by isolation of the Transversus Abdominus or TrA created an increase in Intra-Abdominal Pressure (IAP) co contracted with the multifidus and worked intrinsically with the pelvic floor.

Training the TrA in isolation fails to offer the complete picture and treatment for segmental stability. The diaphragm working in co-contraction with the TrA, pelvic floor and lumbar multifidus present a more appropriate method for stabilising not only the lumbar spine but provide a foundation for a more efficient methodology of rehabilitation which covers stability.

The Rehabilitation School of Prague’s model of Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilisation offers a compelling model of stabilisation via developmental kinesiology. How the developing child moves and integrates stability is an effective method for re-integration of the intrinsic stabilisation system which comprises of the diaphragm, pelvic floor, TrA and spine flexors and extensors. The image below of the open scissors position of the rib cage and pelvis details the oblique angle that can occur when poor stability is mediated by poor diaphragmatic action.

why you get back pain, DNS

With DNS technique the flare of the rib cage and optimal contraction of the diaphragm can be corrected in the space of minutes to provide an optimal pathway for diaphragmatic breathing.

This concept is an effective method for rehabilitation but in my opinion there remain questions when utilising the concept of stability from the trunk. The diaphragm has the capacity to work segmentally too much or too little based upon a client’s injury history. Here are just some of many scenarios where the intrinsic stabilising system could become dysfunctional.

• TMJ or jaw dysfunction • C section or other significant scars on the body • Pelvic floor dysfunction • Any other muscles has the capacity to affect any other muscle in the body. • Local inhibition of synergistic, functional opposites or stabilising muscles • Emotional distress • Broken bones • Functional slings such as the posterior oblique sling, lateral sling and others • Why you get neck pain

Use of a joint by joint approach to testing such as Neuro Kinetic Therapy ™ helps to establish a baseline for dysfunctional patterns of facilitation (overworked muscles) and inhibition (underworking muscles). Decisions should be made as whether a mobility or a motor control issue exist. Motor control or the ability of the muscles to be efficiently recruited by the nervous system can be rectified by understanding patterns of inhibition and rewiring the nervous system for optimal control. Integration between both NKT and DNS techniques allows for a progression from pain and dysfunction to integrated movement patterns that can be hard wired with practice of developmental kinesiology exercises.

Many traditional and rehabilitation conditioning exercises often serve to increase dysfunction. Extension and even neutral load training based exercises such as deadlifts, bird dogs and horse stances can increase activation of the thoracolumbar fascia which serves as a conduit for force transfer especially for the posterior oblique sling. index

A release of the thorocolumbar fascia and integration of the posterior oblique sling through proprioception via taping or exercises remains an efficient method of neuro muscular activation rather than just increasing motor activity via strength and conditioning exercises. tape Posterior oblique sling and reducing back pain

Integration of techniques allows for a much more efficient treatment for clients who suffer from pain and movement dysfunction and can truly get to the core of both acute and chronic conditions. Isolated approaches yield isolated results.

To find out more about how to get out of pain and improve movement and energy please get in touch.

References:

Frank, C Kobesova, A and Kolar, P.Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilisation and Sports Therapy.Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2013 February; 8(1): 62–73. Myers, T. Anatomy Trains. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. 2001. Richardson C, Hodges P and Hides, J. Therapeutic Lumbo Pelvic Stabilisation. Churchill Livingstone. 1999 Weinstock, D. Nuero Kinetic Therapy. An Innovative Approach to Muscle Testing. North Atlantic Books.

Why cycling for rehabilitation is not a good idea

Image-1 (2)

Many rehabilitation practitioners from surgeons to physios advocate stationary cycling as an integral part of the rehabilitation process for many injuries and in particular for knee injuries such as ACL (cruciate ligament injuries). There has been many discussions as to whether open (able to move through) or closed chain exercise (has to move against) is the best form of exercise to improve function. But is cycling and spinning counter-productive for improving (real) functional outcomes in post injury and operative situations?

What are the advantages of cycling for rehabilitation?

  1. Low load on the injured area.
  2. Localised conditioning
  3. Maintains localised fitness or allegedly maintains cardiovascular health

In a nutshell, cycling supposedly provides a low impact form of exercise that maintains some element of CV fitness and may give limited localised strength to quadriceps. In some cases of cruciate ligament injuries, people fail to increase adequate quadriceps strength. In which case, cycling and particularly spinning will be of little benefit to the rehabilitation process. In fact, an over reliance on the calf muscles with activities such as cycling can inhibit not only the quadriceps but the hip flexors, glutes and many other muscles, increasing subsequent dysfunction and future pain. Many clients that I have seen who either teach spinning or take part on it have often suffered from plantar fascia issues and over developed calf muscles that have often inhibited the thigh muscles.

Take a look at the picture above and this will give you an idea of why cycling can be detrimental to those seeking to improve functional strength. Here are some potential reasons.

  •  Inability to train functional slings such as the lateral, posterior oblique, deep longitudinal and anterior oblique sling.
  • Train the muscles into poor posture, note that with the picture above there is an approximate angle of 60 plus degrees of the thoracic spine.
  • Due to the angle of the pelvis, there is poor muscular recruitment between the knee and hip, flexors and extensors. In many cases the gastrocnemius of the calf has the potential to disrupt optimal mechanics of many of the muscles need to provide stability for the kne
  • Many people mistake the fitness associated with cycling as strength but in fact, training this way, serves to decrease optimal muscular recruitment and increase dysfunction.

Muscular slings in all their forms, whether it is from Vleeming or Myers, suggest optimal muscular recruitment via the use of slings, optimal use of fascia and a framework for tensegrity models. Take the posterior oblique sling, as pictured below. Its function during gait is documented and just one method for optimising support for all structures involving gait and performance. Any rehab methodologies should integrate these systems for optimal alignment, support and movement for injured or compromised structures. Sitting on a cycle provides insufficient training stimulus for structures that provide the most effective forms of joint stability and motor control.

Image-1 (4)

Individuals deserve the most time efficient and effective forms of therapy and exercise. Outcomes such as improved mobility, stability and enhanced motor control should be the goal and sitting on a bike may give a false positive as to enhanced function but it does not carry over to real world gains.  Spinning in particular continues to create dysfunction and disrupt optimal biomechanics. The fitness industry continues to use modalities that whilst make people, hot, sweaty and  increased  whoop factor and appear that they have done some good, actually creates injury after injury. Instead of telling people to get on your bike, we should be telling people to get off and use your legs properly.

Old injuries and new pain?

Image-1 (2) Most people don't associate long term injuries that are often asymptomatic with current levels of pain. This single case study is a great way of demonstrating just how this can occur.

Brief history of client-34 year old rugby player presenting with recurrent achilles pain despite long term physio. A great case of lifitis as somebody reminded me about my own injuries recently! Two ruptured biceps over the last decade and neck injuries to boot. Presented with inhibited bilateral hamstrings, right lat, neck extensors and left rectus femoris and quadricep (hip and thigh muscles) inhibited. Also poor dorsi flexion (raising the foot from the floor) inhibited by his calf muscles. His thoroca-lumbar fascia, the piece of tissue that connects the glutes and lats was holding a lot of tension and contributing to a poor link between these two powerful muscles.

Compensation can take many forms. For example with this case the client was usiing his diaphragm to help stabilise other joints in his body that was not balanced with the pelvic floor and TVA (transversus abdominis or hoop like muscle that is a key player in spinal and segmental stability)

After testing and re-activating the muscles that were inhibited using NKT (TM) the muscles, I taped the right to left posterior oblique sling as you can see in the picture, with great results. The tape acts as a conduit for proprioception or communication between this key sling. Client has been free of achilles pain despite training heavily during pre season rugby training.tape Posterior oblique sling

Analysis in the form of SFMA selective functional movement assessment and re-establishing neural pathways through the use of NKT, appropriate treatment and exercise have ensured that this client got out of pain most effectively and the interesting part...I didn't touch his heel to get rid of the pain! To find out how to get pain free, moving and grooving get in touch to find out more.

Cesarean section or Chaos section? Why you may have back pain after your baby.

Medical systems can often create a vicious cycle and the Cesarean section is one such cycle. The creation of specialist departments often creates a vacuum where, what some might think as minor issues go ignored, yet affect those who have to undertake specialist procedures. In any other system say finance or banking it would be called negligence or incompetence for failing to notice where the system broke down (something not often noticed until after the debacle has occurred) but because it often involves individuals who suffer from one of the most common medical issues in the world the cause and effect often go unnoticed. It's a simple statement Cesarean sections could be one of the leading causes of back pain in females. A statement that can be validated fairly easily when you observe this phenomenon on a regular basis . I have never met a female client who had a C-section who didn't suffer from either lumbar, cervical or sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Governments who want to save hundreds of millions of unnecessary cash spent on treating back pain may want to scrutinise this point. It often serves the medical insurance system to keep this cycle system in full flow.lumbar spine

Females who have suffered from back pain, most likely due to failure to rehabilitate the key stabilising mechanisms of the the lumbo-pelvic complex may have avoided back pain all together. Implementing a basic program would not only help to avoid back pain but may aid women back into exercise much sooner assisting any psychological issues such as post-natal depression.

A general rule for low level exercise post C-section to begin is 6-8 weeks. The healing process starts immediately post op and the nutritional status and individuals immune system plays a significant role in healing time, decrease of infections and energetic processes.

During the surgery process. The skin, abdominal fascia, Rectus Abdominus and Transversus Abdominus (TrA) are easily severed with many nerves also being affected by the surgeons scalpel. This is where the chaos begins. Whilst the global implications of movement dysfunction are readily observed with restrictions to simple tasks such as standing, sitting and even turning over in bed. The local intrinsic nature of lumbo-pelvic stabilisation dysfunction is not observed until the women attends a specialist to deal with a particular pain syndrome. More often than not light cardiovascular exercise is recommended which serves to deepen the dysfunction not only due to the lack of appropriate muscle activation but also due to its effects on respiration.

The TrA whilst important with its synergistic role with the multifidi, diaphragm, pelvic floor muscles also has an essential function with respiration. During inspiration the primary muscle of inspiration the diaphragm contracts displacing the abdominal viscera outwards and downwards placing both the muscles of the pelvic floor and TrA in a stretched position. The natural recoil of the TrA assists in exhalation,helping to force air from the lungs. Post C-section this action can diminish placing additional stress on the excessory muscles of respiration. Additionally the flexors of the trunk, primarily the Rectus abdominis often become inhibited and other muscles can facilitate in response to altered movement dysfunction. In one case a patient with multiple C-sections presented with chronic recurrent cervical and lumbar disc issues. In particular the MRI showed a flattened cervical spine and it is worth-speculating that the anterior cervical flexors facilitated in response to a lack of trunk flexion. The patient was literally trying to flex her whole spine with her neck flexors. Use of Neuro Kinetic Therapy (TM) helped to re-establish synergistic neck and trunk flexion by restoring equilibrium.conceptual model

In this and 100% of all clients who have had a C-section the TrA can either be facilitated or inhibited. strategies to stabilise compromised structures and dysfunctional movement can be local or global. How Muscular dysfunction occurs

Strategies can include:

Breath holding via facilitation and compromised diaphragmatic action Facilitation of the pelvic floor Clenching of the masticatory muscles of the TMJ/Jaw Local compensation such as Quadratus Lumborum facilitation Cervical muscle facilitation and inhibition Altered lower limb mechanics including plantar fascia and disruption of dorsi flexion and toe mechanics.

Scar tissue formation can be problematic due to adhesions of healing tissue in particular to fascial continuation, function and adhesion of tissue to internal organs. Addressing these adhesions and restoring optimal function of the TrA and its dual facilitory or inhibitory effect on both local and global structures can be achieved with therapies such as NKT and appropriate corrective exercises. Even without a Cesarean section, you can apply the same rationale to tears or episiotomy procedures and the same fuzziness that the nervous system experiences when trying to provide stability to the body.

References: Chek, P. Posture and Craniofacial Pain. A Chiropractic Approach to Head Pain. Williams and Wilkins 1994

Weinstock, D. Neuro Kinetic Therapy. North Atlantic Books. Berkeley, California.