Adrenal fatigue or reductionist thinking? Part 2: Restoration of metabolic processes

adrenal Restoration of metabolic process- lowering the adrenal load.

Sugar, fat and other mal-aligned  factors.

Saturated fat is bad for you, so they said but it clearly wasn’t. Now it’s sugars turn. Sugar causes diabetes, cancer and many other modern conditions, if you are to believe many of the memes on social media. Well no, it doesn’t. Cancer for example is usually created from a specific defect to the respiratory apparatus of the cell. In English that means part of the cell that utilises oxygen. Sugar or Sucrose whose primary constituents are both Fructose and Glucose are readily available carbohydrates and the brain/central nervous system require plenty. Have you ever noticed that brain fog creep in when on that low carb diet? The reason? Restricted carbohydrates  equals reduced cognitive process’s. Yes we can generate glucose via oxidation of fat, in the form of ketosis and you can also break down protein to generate glucose too, but these methods are less than efficient forms of energy generation and long-term utilisation of these systems is not ideal.

Sugar produces energy and when processed with oxygen is much more efficient than glycolysis or energy production without oxygen (anaerobic). In those who have damaged metabolism, there is a reliance on the production of energy in this manner, lactic acid is often produced even at rest. Therefore trying to exercise at intense levels poses a problem for those with both adrenal and metabolic issues.

Give the body what it needs?  Got cravings? You know those ones where you are dying for some food, starchy carbohydrates, a sugary drink? There are no demons at work here, just a simple case of biology, carbohydrates are a primary fuel source for the body. Want to avoid coming crashing down? Avoid having 3 big meals a day and maintain blood sugar levels by eating frequently. Some do better than others but allowing 4-6 meals a day and noting how you feel is a step in the right direction. Maintaining a body temperature of 37 degrees and a pulse rate of 70-85 beats per minute is ideal. This has been well documented in the work of thyroid researcher Broda Barnes and the work of Ray Peat PhD.

Eating readily available carbohydrates such as ripe digestible fruits, protein and saturated fats (in the right amounts) such as coconut oil help to maintain blood sugar levels throughout the day without the resultant elevations in cortisol, which affect adrenal regulation issues.

Stressful situations often warrant the use of supplements such as Vitamins A, B6, C, magnesium and potassium. In particular sugary foods, which should include fruit, maple syrup and honey are ideal choices to diminish the stress response (even table sugar could play a therapeutic role in lowering stress).

Salt is also a powerful anti-stress compound. During stress sodium is often passed more rapidly from the body. Sodium spares magnesium. If you drink too much water the level of sodium excretion increases, which further decreases available magnesium. The research on lowering salt intake is inconclusive but what is known, is that when a low sodium state exists, aldosterone, a hormone that is used to regulate both salt and blood pressure elevates in response. It would come as no surprise that in a low adrenal state, feeling dizzy when moving from seated to standing exits due to poor blood pressure regulation. Craving salt is a mechanism to improve such a situation.

The current mind set regarding exercise and wellbeing is

Increased exercise + Low carb and raw foods = Health

And in the short term, markers suggest that this could be favourable. So how do you tell if this working for you long term? The monitoring of both pulse and body temperature give a great insight into optimal biological function. Here are some of the symptoms, which combine both compromised cortisol and thyroid function.

  • Cold hands, feet and nose
  • Energy crashes
  • Poor wound healing
  • Poor sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation or alternation between constipation and diarrheoa
  • Weight gain
  • Bloating
  • Skin issues
  • Low libido

In reality:

Intense exercise + low carb/raw food diets= compromised metabolism.

Historically in many, changing both the way you eat and completing more exercise may have worked previously, but as you push the markers of exercising more and eating less or certainly eating foods that do not support your activities. You may see many of those symptoms above start to creep into your daily life. There’s no doubt that eating well and exercising are productive pursuits for optimal body function. However for many the lines are blurred as to what actually is a healthy diet.  Consumption of large amounts of grains, margarine and low fat foods were being touted as healthy a decade or two earlier, now look at the research condemning that approach. The following information seems to be heading a similar route.

For the health conscious exerciser today a diet high in raw green vegetables, green juices, seeds nuts, fish oils, low carb, low starch seems to be the zeitgeist but is it that healthy? From a biological perspective the answer would be no. Eating these foods over a long period of time not only increases the stress response but may actually damage how our body’s cells actually function. Increasing available energy from easily digestible foods helps to assimilate energy for production. In contrast foods such as many raw green vegetables, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils, not only irritate the bowel, sit and accumulate bacteria damaging the intestinal lining, but also provide less than optimal nutrition, which will lower metabolic rate.

Moving is important, no doubt, but exercising to within an inch of total fatigue can be detrimental, especially so when dealing with issues related to both adrenal and metabolic based issues. Finding the right type of exercise and even stepping back and focusing on exercise that doesn’t produce high levels of lactic acid, causes hyperventilation and the loss of carbon dioxide should be considered in the short term. The goal of improving metabolic function, restoring deep sleep and raising energy should always predominate over the loss of body fat reduction. It’s a tricky issue to get your head around for some, but when you start to feel great again. You’ll understand why.