Is your technique driving your injuries

Image-1 Training the classics like deadlifts and squats are an integral part of training and getting strong. More often than not we tend to sacrifice key parts of our body like a sacrificial lamb to the slaughter, inviting injury with each rep. One of the most common things that I see with clients deadlifting and injuries, is the drive with the neck in a fully extended position, which is shown above.

Using a body part to drive a movement isn't detrimental and as the motor control command is executed it has to start somehwere but extending the cervical spine shifts the emphasis on the kinetic chain. As the Cervical extensors are fully contracted, the whole extensor chain has to ensure that all the work is completed whilst a fully extended position is held. Short tight cervical extensors are a common finding in many people and their recruitment/facilitation and inhibition with many factors can be linked with issues in the calf and plantar fascia of the feet.

You will notice in the picture below as theorised by Myers and others that the superficial back line is a complete chain from head to toe. Facilitation of the cervical extensors can contribute to forward head posture and postural changes in the thoracic spine, shoulder and lower down the chain. Instead of creating injury hotspots, keeping the neck in a more aligned neutral throughout the lift and using the eyes to drive into extension can help alleviate the problems associated with facilitated neck muscles.

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