Old injuries and new pain?

Image-1 (2) Most people don't associate long term injuries that are often asymptomatic with current levels of pain. This single case study is a great way of demonstrating just how this can occur.

Brief history of client-34 year old rugby player presenting with recurrent achilles pain despite long term physio. A great case of lifitis as somebody reminded me about my own injuries recently! Two ruptured biceps over the last decade and neck injuries to boot. Presented with inhibited bilateral hamstrings, right lat, neck extensors and left rectus femoris and quadricep (hip and thigh muscles) inhibited. Also poor dorsi flexion (raising the foot from the floor) inhibited by his calf muscles. His thoroca-lumbar fascia, the piece of tissue that connects the glutes and lats was holding a lot of tension and contributing to a poor link between these two powerful muscles.

Compensation can take many forms. For example with this case the client was usiing his diaphragm to help stabilise other joints in his body that was not balanced with the pelvic floor and TVA (transversus abdominis or hoop like muscle that is a key player in spinal and segmental stability)

After testing and re-activating the muscles that were inhibited using NKT (TM) the muscles, I taped the right to left posterior oblique sling as you can see in the picture, with great results. The tape acts as a conduit for proprioception or communication between this key sling. Client has been free of achilles pain despite training heavily during pre season rugby training.tape Posterior oblique sling

Analysis in the form of SFMA selective functional movement assessment and re-establishing neural pathways through the use of NKT, appropriate treatment and exercise have ensured that this client got out of pain most effectively and the interesting part...I didn't touch his heel to get rid of the pain! To find out how to get pain free, moving and grooving get in touch to find out more.