Infra Red light

Sunlight, health and cancer

The more you read, the more holes you find in many theories.

The more you read, the more holes you find in many theories.

Increasing sunlight exposure increases an individuals health and decreases cancer risk. In the last year or two I remember reading a quote from a professor of dermatology at a university in the U.S. who stated, “ There is no amount of sun that is good for the skin.” Clearly said professor skipped basic biology in secondary school or has had a lifetime of examining patients with excess PUFA (polyunsaturated fatty acids) in their diet, which is associated with increased incidence of skin cancer (there’s also a hopeful possibility that he was quoted out of context but I live in hope). Sun and skin cancer are clearly linked. Or are they? It doesn’t appear so clear cut. I first became interested in light around 2009 and its benefits to health after reading Female Hormones in Context by Ray Peat. His suggestions that sunlight can, “cure depression, improve immunity, stimulate our metabolism, while decreasing food cravings and increase our intelligence, ” (Peat, 1997) intrigued me to gain a deeper understanding.Whilst I was aware of the harms of an excess of UV light, which can damage skin but is essential for increasing vitamin D levels. The far-reaching benefits of the spectrum of red and orange lights were unbeknownst to me.

Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is well documented and the mechanisms may be due to a number of factors such as increases in serotonin and melatonin. People generally get sicker and more depressed in winter and light therapy appears to be a useful tool in overcoming some of the symptoms associated with mood, energy and immune system related issues. If light is so harmful, why is it we often need more in these times and why has sunlight become so vilified?

Sunlight appears to get a bad rap in an ever increasingly reductionist causal relationship, in as much as sunlight causes skin cancer. Therefore wear sunscreen and avoid it. However current literature suggestions are along the lines of; “Wearing sunscreen increases sun exposure and increases incidence of melanoma and skin cancer.” Like many other approaches this A to B inference neglects to mention other pertinent mechanisms that can be attributed to increased incidence of cancerous states.

Cancer is a well known metabolic disease that can occur when specific effects to cells, namely mitochondria and the electron transport chain (ETC - often termed respiratory defects which allows problematic features of metabolism to occur, increasing damaging compounds). Cancer can be a feature of poor differentiation. Damage to tissues can often require new tissue to be formed. If an architect informs the site manager how to build the structure from just the blueprints without appreciation of the surrounding land and features, you can’t always guarantee success of completion.

Promoting better conversations between structures     

Vitamin A - promotes cell differentiation (this is very important when damaged tissue is rebuilt), improves immune system function and optimal hormone function. A meta analysis in 2016 highlighted vitamin A’s protective functions and usefulness in protection against skin related disease such as melanoma through inhibiting malignant transformation and decreasing tumour size and improving survival rates (Zhang, Chu, & Liu, 2014). It’s important to note that retinol from liver sources is the effective compound in this action and not carotenoids. Other findings such as anaemia are synergistic with decreased vitamin A levels due to its critical role in the immune system and fighting infection (Semba & Bloem, 2002). Vitamin A has similar actions to organisational compounds such as progesterone and thyroid.

A question worth exploring - Does a vitamin A deficiency decrease differentiation and lead to a potential increase in cancerous type states when exposed to UV light?

Estrogen

Estrogen has been implicated in many cancerous states, primarily due to its role in tissue proliferation. When unchecked by levels of progesterone, it can be responsible for unwanted tissue growth and mutagenicity (Mungenast & Thalhammer, 2014) (Troisi et al., 2014). Levels can be increased due to external sources in the environment and through increased conversion of testosterone in adipose tissue to estrogen via aromatase in both men and women (Skakkebæk, 2003)(Cargouët, Bimbot, Levi, & Perdiz, 2006). The potential increases in cancerous states such as melanoma due to modulation of estrogen might be an easy target for excess levels of U.V. light to exert a negative influence in susceptible tissues. Therefore keeping estrogen low and utilising estrogen lowering strategies through food choices and avoidance of certain compounds can be useful.

Fat status of tissues.

I often found that when my diet was high in unsaturated fats my skin burnt extremely quickly. It’s been noted that people who often use sunblock often burn much quicker when in the sun without sunscreen. Increased consumption of unsaturated fatty acids appear to be linked to an increase in melanoma (Bourne, Mackie, & Curtin, 1987). Anecdotally I found that with a large decrease in PUFA my skin tolerates much longer bouts of sunshine before burning (not bad for a semi ginger pasty bloke from Kent!) , even in the intense middle-eastern heat. High fat diets, whether un/saturated also decrease mitochondrial activity and lower oxidative metabolism (Titov et al., 2016). It’s well known that vegetable oil consumption is linked to cancer (Niknamian, S., Kalamian, 2016) and heated vegetable oils that enter the body are already oxidised causing additional inflammation.

Perhaps melanoma is substantially increased when an individual has increased estrogen exposure, excessive amounts of unsaturated fatty acids in the skin and vitamin A deficiency but does that still implicate sunlight as the cause of skin cancer? The A to B scenario hopefully seems less convincing.

Modulating estrogen and decreasing PUFA in the skin is a step in the right direction. Increasing skin tolerance for longer days in the sun will be beneficial for many people. Using a homemade sun screen with minimal PUFA in can be useful for those wanting to spend extra time in the sun without damaging the skin and of course depending on the latitude, avoiding peak sun times is prudent to avoid excess UV light.

More information on resolving these issues can be found in the member’s area.

References:

Bourne, D. J., Mackie, L. E., & Curtin, L. D. (1987). Melanoma and Dietary Lipids. Nutrition and Cancer, 9(4), 219–226. http://doi.org/10.1080/01635588709513930

Cargouët, M., Bimbot, M., Levi, Y., & Perdiz, D. (2006). Xenoestrogens modulate genotoxic (UVB)-induced cellular responses in estrogen receptors positive human breast cancer cells. Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, 22(1), 104–112. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.etap.2006.01.002

Mungenast, F., & Thalhammer, T. (2014). Estrogen biosynthesis and action in ovarian cancer. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 5(NOV). http://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2014.00192

Niknamian, S., Kalamian, M. (2016). Vegetable Oils Consumption as One of the Leading Cause of Cancer and Heart disease. International Science and Investigation Journal, 5(5).

Peat, R. (1997). From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in context.

Semba, R. D., & Bloem, M. W. (2002). The anemia of vitamin a deficiency: Epidemiology and pathogenesis. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. http://doi.org/10.1038/sj/ejcn/1601320

Skakkebæk, N. E. (2003). Testicular dysgenesis syndrome. In Hormone Research (Vol. 60, p. 49). http://doi.org/10.1159/000074499

Titov, D. V., Cracan, V., Goodman, R. P., Peng, J., Grabarek, Z., & Mootha, V. K. (2016). Complementation of mitochondrial electron transport chain by manipulation of the NAD+/NADH ratio. Science, 352(6282), 231–235. http://doi.org/10.1126/science.aad4017

Troisi, R., Ganmaa, D., Silva, I. D. S., Davaalkham, D., Rosenberg, P. S., Rich-Edwards, J., … Alemany, M. (2014). The role of hormones in the differences in the incidence of breast cancer between Mongolia and the United Kingdom. PLoS ONE, 9(12). http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0114455

Zhang, Y.-P., Chu, R.-X., & Liu, H. (2014). Vitamin A intake and risk of melanoma: a meta-analysis. PloS One, 9(7), e102527. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0102527

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation I first became interested in the healing qualities of light about 5 years ago after reading From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in Context by Ray Peat. The obvious connotations to improved health during summer compared to a so- called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD was well known. The mechanics were intriguing but not limited to the obvious features of Ultra Violet light and the production of Vitamin D.

UV has been known to be problematic and excess, increases ageing of the skin but the mechanisms and links to cancer are misunderstood. An incomplete overview of other potential mechanisms that might promote mutogenic or cancerous processes are often left out of the explanation. The business of sunblock marketing, like many other fear mongering industries, continue to warn us of too much sunlight, yet often we often lack the right amount. An old blog highlights some points relating to this. The qualities of the healing properties of light are often glossed over instead of promoting the optimal rays of the sun..

The light which penetrates deeply into our tissues (mainly orange and red light) is able to improve the efficiency of energy production, and to suppress the toxic free-radicals that are always being formed in cells. “

Consideration of the healing properties of certain wavelengths of light is a must for health, metabolic and rehabilitation promotion. The useOrange and red rays of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades. In 1903 a Nobel science prize was awarded to Niels Finsen for ultraviolet-phototherapy.

Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

The use of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades.

Here are just some of the issues that have seen great improvement using LLLT and Photobiomodulation.

  • Pain reduction
  • Improved hormone function
  • Swelling reduction
  • Increased healing
  • Neurological issues
  • Improved cellular function
  • Promote recovery from exercise
  • Rehabilitation of injuries
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Improved hair follicle stimulation

The use of infra red heat lamps have been used for decades and often been recommended in rehabilitation or in the beauty world as an anti-aging protocol. I have used heat lamps with myself and clients for several years but it is clear that many gains can be had without the use of heat and just focusing on the use of light alone.

There are many factors that can make the use of light more effective and these illumination parameters include:

  • Wavelength
  • Fluence
  • Power density
  • Pulse structure
  • Timing

For many, even finding these variables may prove a difficult task. In fact even using the word Photobiomodulation becomes problematic! I think the exposure of bright light during the day through incandescent or LED lights is important to offset the lack of natural daylight and healing properties of various waveforms, (unless of course you do work or spend much of your day outside) with the use of red light after sunset to decrease impact to circadian rhythm.

One of the most prevalent mechanisms that appears to offer an explanation as to LLLT’s effectiveness is by increasing cytochrome c oxidase which improves mitochondrial function, increasing cell efficiency and function and improving energy production.

The wavelength of 600-950nm or optical window is a general guideline and appears to be where most of the research and the effects of LLLT has been conducted on. The toxinless website listed below has some great recommendations for the use of light and ideal set ups, which are very cheap to set up at home.

The use of LLLT for improving hormones and in particular thyroid function has gained a greater following of late. It’s worth noting, that in some studies which can be found on Valtsu’s website (a great resource for thyroid) , the use of LLLT improved thyroid function without the need for thyroid medication. Additional studies corroborate the effectiveness in reducing the need for thyroid medication and addressing autoimmune thyroiditis.  Therefore I think the use of LLLT for improving energy, digestion, mood and sleep is validated.

References:

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause : Female Hormones in Context. 1997.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22747309

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12804422

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26048721

Online resources:

http://valtsus.blogspot.fi/2015/09/hypothyroidism-could-it-be-treated-with.html

http://www.toxinless.com/red-light

http://www.photobiology.info/Hamblin.html