episiotomy

Scar tissue - is it an issue?

Is scar tissue really an issue? Alongside myself, scars may be one of the most under appreciated and neglected structures, when it comes to assessing aspects of an individual's pain and movement limitations.   For many people, which include physicians, surgeons and often the owners of said scars, there’s an acceptance that the scar has healed and is not involved in any process of pain, strength or movement dysfunction. Dr’s and surgeons often assume that time enables optimal healing and patients simply forget about the previous trauma. Time may be a great healer but the healing is only partial - the nervous system always remembers. Writing this, reminds me of a client who had filled in all historical injury and trauma that he had experienced on my intake forms, which might have been a factor in his chronic back pain. It wasn’t until he took his top off and under questioning revealed that he had  donated his kidney to his brother some twenty years ago. It wasn't a big deal though as it was twenty years ago apparently.

This sequence of events has been summarised as homeostatic, inflammation, granulation and remodelling phases (1) which are undergoing symbiotic relationships with other structures and dependant on energetic, endocrine and other functions of the individual, which often depend on environmental stimulus. During the granulation and proliferation phase, sub-phases, which include collagen deposition, remodelling of blood vessels and tissues occur. It’s likely that during these phases the health and energetic response of the individual will dictate the capacity to regenerate and may also influence the layers of dysfunction that are present with scar tissue.

“ In childhood, wounds heal quickly and inflammation is resolved, in extreme age, or during extreme stress or starvation, wound healing is much slower and the nature of inflammation and would closure is different. “Ray Peat.

Unsaturated vegetable fats, serotonin and estrogen promote collagen synthesis and resulting fibrosis and keloid scars are associated with these states (3). Perhaps the capacity to organise energy and regenerate are instrumental in decreasing the associated dysfunctions that can be found in all scar tissue? Most Drs that I have spoken to just assume that after 12 weeks the scar has generally healed and that normally activity can be resumed. As a rule, there is no thought given to mechanical, pain sensitising or emotional constraints induced by the presence of the scar. It’s generally accepted that most scars have 80% tensile strength of the previous structure, but again might that too be a product of the quality of healing available to the individual?

“ The amount of disorganised fibrous material formed in injured tissue is variable and depends on state of the individual and tissue situation. “

In hypothyroidism, high levels of the pituitary hormone TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) are known to stimulate fibrosis (1) Maintaining adequate thyroid hormone production promotes DNA transcription, optimal energy production, carbon dioxide production and probably decreases the proliferative effects of 'estrogenic' states that can be attributed to keloid scar formation.

The bigger the scar, the more likely the associated dysfunction? Perhaps the more disorganised tissue that exists, the increased likelihood of fuzziness between the central nervous system and output to structures associated with that scar. In scar tissue that has not been assessed or treated, it's relatively easy to induce weakness or stress to the surrounding tissues by a variety of stimulus which might include thinking and different types of pain,  touch or vectors of stretch that create neurological chaos or threat to to the individual.

Good therapy should allow for conversations between the clinician and patient that create stimulus that may (or may not) affect the output of surrounding structures associated with the scar. Poor feedback mediated by the scar might involve the following:

Emotional: Aspects of recall of the event that the individual finds upsetting.

Nociception/pain: First and second pain, visual or auditory, crude/fine touch, tickle/itch temperature, stress or recall od suffering responses to stimulus. (Involve pain feedback related to spinothalamic, spinotectal, spinohypothalamic and spinomesencephalic tracts)

Mechanical: Pressure, rebound, stretch, joint mechanoreceptors and other responses to tissue and structures. (Related to Golgi, Pacini, Ruffini and other dorsal column feedback pathways.)

Improving the optimal healing of scar tissue might involve aspects such as adequate carbohydrate, proteins, sunlight (or red light), carbon dioxide, thyroid, progesterone, vitamin A and E. Avoiding phytoestrogens and low carbohydrate diets would also be prudent.

Despite optimised nutrition and endocrine function, it’s likely that many scars leave some artefact that prevents the nervous system communicating with tissues. C - sections, episiotomies, appendectomies, laparoscopies and most surgeries, injuries or trauma leave a trace that needs to be resolved with the right therapy. Inhibition can be purposeful but restoration might need a little nudge from therapies like proprioceptive deep tendon reflex (P-DTR).

References:

  1. Kim, D., Kim, W., Joo, S. K., Bae, J. M., Kim, J. H., & Ahmed, A. (2018). Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Low-Normal Thyroid Function Are Associated With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Fibrosis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 16(1), 123–131.e1. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2017.08.014

  2. https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1298129-overview?pa=1ZDxXAnEOeNV9BUnYezdYpt49YJzASbxEvvw80YIDjlelzZDQj3XLvbI0V2MbTq%2FX8MwC0EECwzp432Skuf9qw%3D%3D

  3. http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/regeneration-degeneration.shtml

Cesarean section or Chaos section? Why you may have back pain after your baby.

Medical systems can often create a vicious cycle and the Cesarean section is one such cycle. The creation of specialist departments often creates a vacuum where, what some might think as minor issues go ignored, yet affect those who have to undertake specialist procedures. In any other system say finance or banking it would be called negligence or incompetence for failing to notice where the system broke down (something not often noticed until after the debacle has occurred) but because it often involves individuals who suffer from one of the most common medical issues in the world the cause and effect often go unnoticed. It's a simple statement Cesarean sections could be one of the leading causes of back pain in females. A statement that can be validated fairly easily when you observe this phenomenon on a regular basis . I have never met a female client who had a C-section who didn't suffer from either lumbar, cervical or sacroiliac joint dysfunction. Governments who want to save hundreds of millions of unnecessary cash spent on treating back pain may want to scrutinise this point. It often serves the medical insurance system to keep this cycle system in full flow.lumbar spine

Females who have suffered from back pain, most likely due to failure to rehabilitate the key stabilising mechanisms of the the lumbo-pelvic complex may have avoided back pain all together. Implementing a basic program would not only help to avoid back pain but may aid women back into exercise much sooner assisting any psychological issues such as post-natal depression.

A general rule for low level exercise post C-section to begin is 6-8 weeks. The healing process starts immediately post op and the nutritional status and individuals immune system plays a significant role in healing time, decrease of infections and energetic processes.

During the surgery process. The skin, abdominal fascia, Rectus Abdominus and Transversus Abdominus (TrA) are easily severed with many nerves also being affected by the surgeons scalpel. This is where the chaos begins. Whilst the global implications of movement dysfunction are readily observed with restrictions to simple tasks such as standing, sitting and even turning over in bed. The local intrinsic nature of lumbo-pelvic stabilisation dysfunction is not observed until the women attends a specialist to deal with a particular pain syndrome. More often than not light cardiovascular exercise is recommended which serves to deepen the dysfunction not only due to the lack of appropriate muscle activation but also due to its effects on respiration.

The TrA whilst important with its synergistic role with the multifidi, diaphragm, pelvic floor muscles also has an essential function with respiration. During inspiration the primary muscle of inspiration the diaphragm contracts displacing the abdominal viscera outwards and downwards placing both the muscles of the pelvic floor and TrA in a stretched position. The natural recoil of the TrA assists in exhalation,helping to force air from the lungs. Post C-section this action can diminish placing additional stress on the excessory muscles of respiration. Additionally the flexors of the trunk, primarily the Rectus abdominis often become inhibited and other muscles can facilitate in response to altered movement dysfunction. In one case a patient with multiple C-sections presented with chronic recurrent cervical and lumbar disc issues. In particular the MRI showed a flattened cervical spine and it is worth-speculating that the anterior cervical flexors facilitated in response to a lack of trunk flexion. The patient was literally trying to flex her whole spine with her neck flexors. Use of Neuro Kinetic Therapy (TM) helped to re-establish synergistic neck and trunk flexion by restoring equilibrium.conceptual model

In this and 100% of all clients who have had a C-section the TrA can either be facilitated or inhibited. strategies to stabilise compromised structures and dysfunctional movement can be local or global. How Muscular dysfunction occurs

Strategies can include:

Breath holding via facilitation and compromised diaphragmatic action Facilitation of the pelvic floor Clenching of the masticatory muscles of the TMJ/Jaw Local compensation such as Quadratus Lumborum facilitation Cervical muscle facilitation and inhibition Altered lower limb mechanics including plantar fascia and disruption of dorsi flexion and toe mechanics.

Scar tissue formation can be problematic due to adhesions of healing tissue in particular to fascial continuation, function and adhesion of tissue to internal organs. Addressing these adhesions and restoring optimal function of the TrA and its dual facilitory or inhibitory effect on both local and global structures can be achieved with therapies such as NKT and appropriate corrective exercises. Even without a Cesarean section, you can apply the same rationale to tears or episiotomy procedures and the same fuzziness that the nervous system experiences when trying to provide stability to the body.

References: Chek, P. Posture and Craniofacial Pain. A Chiropractic Approach to Head Pain. Williams and Wilkins 1994

Weinstock, D. Neuro Kinetic Therapy. North Atlantic Books. Berkeley, California.