pain

A biochemical approach to decreasing muscle pain with food and hormones.

pain and hormones

pain and hormones

A biochemical approach to decreasing muscle pain is often the last place most people look and that includes many pain specialists. Modulating pain and hormones through food and other variables can create some impressive results. Aches and pains are a common theme in every day living. Some people seek to push themselves harder with excessive training schedules, others spend more time in a seated position and other factors contribute to tissue not responding the way that it should. Pain and the concept of nociception is a system of feedback for the body that is protective in essence. You touch something you shouldn’t; first pain kicks in to remove you from the painful stimulus (lasts less than 0.1 seconds), after that and depending on severity of damage second pain kicks in.

First pain and second pain (both reside in the anterolateral system or ALS) utilise different chemical messengers and another factor for this form of feedback is that other nociceptive factors like touch, visual, auditory and other sensations of stress can be part of the problematic feedback if not resolved. All of these have the capacity to interrupt optimal motor control and functioning of joints and soft tissues and affect hormone profiles. Even a bad smell can create neurological chaos.

Another less well known aspect (in therapy based settings) of disruptive function in muscle tissue are the effects of hormones that may lead to decreased feed back and be responsible for pain. Hypothyroidism affects muscle tissue via energy and neurological deficiencies.

Hypothyroidism results in

Slower peripheral and central nerve conduction velocity Lower body temperature is a factor creating slowed velocity Decreased active cell transport in the cerebral cortex Decreased flux of sodium and calcium for contraction/relaxation Poor production of energy for contraction/relaxation Decreases depolarisation of action potential

cold body

cold body

In a nutshell a colder, slower body leads to a decreased   coordinated body that has a hard time contracting and relaxing muscle tissue. This can lead to increased incidence of injury and pain.

A slowed heart rate is a sign of hypothyroidism and the bradychardia (slowed heart rate) should serve the purpose of describing the decreased rate of function throughout all muscle tissue. Thyroid hormone can improve both rate of contraction and relaxation in both fast and slow twitch muscles but also exerts a cardio protective role on blood vessels and bowel function via smooth muscle tissue. The documented symptoms of hypertension and constipation along with the neuromuscular actions tend to resolve with adequate thyroid hormone (Gao, Zhang, Zhang, Yang, & Chen, 2013).

Prior to initiating thyroid therapy it’s essential to rule out functionally hypothyroid states induced by diet, stress, excess exercise and other environmental factors. Many clients often present with lowered temperature, with cold hands, feet and nose, altered bowel, sleep and emotional function, which can often be resolved with appropriate energy and decreased intestinal irritants.

Chronic pain increases cortisol production which decreases thyroid hormone production (Samuels & McDaniel, 1997) as does fasting or calorie restriction which induces a decrease in available T3 (thyroid hormone) (Hulbert, 2000).

This gives us two approaches 1) to reduce pain with appropriate therapy and to ensure that adequate energy modulates the suppression of excess cortisol and increases available thyroid for tissue organisation and recovery.

Hormones also affect tendons; diabetics and poor insulin profiles appear to create disorganised tendon structure but this may be a factor related to decreased available thyroid hormone. Hypothyroidism decreases available T3 within tendons, which can decrease growth, structure, and collagen production and create hypoxia of tissue leading to calcification.

Estrogen, although necessary for growth of tissue can often be found in excess creating problematic growth. Estrogen is also well known to decrease thyroid hormone and can provide an explanation why more females then men tend to be hypothyroid. The decrease in both thyroid hormone and progesterone can increase muccopolysacharides, which increase pressure in tissues, creating puffy, oedema like states. The swelling can be linked to many pain states which include carpal tunnel, which can be resolved with progesterone and thyroid in the absence of physical therapy. Progesterone also appears to induce myelination of nerves (surrounds and allows nerve conduction) and decreases inflammation (Milani et al 2010).

Energy production remains  a most potent form of therapy for decreasing pain, optimising rehabilitation and restoring tissue function.

References:

  1. Gao, N., Zhang, W., Zhang, Y., Yang, Q., & Chen, S. (2013). Carotid intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism: A meta-analysis. Atherosclerosis, 227(1), 18–25. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.070

  2. Hulbert, A. (2000). Thyroid hormones and their effects: a new perspective. Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 75(4), 519–631. http://doi.org/10.1017/S146479310000556X

  3. Milani, P., Mondelli, M., Ginanneschi, F., Mazzocchio, R., & Rossi, A. (2010). Progesterone - new therapy in mild carpal tunnel syndrome? Study design of a randomized clinical trial for local therapy. Journal of Brachial Plexus and Peripheral Nerve Injury, 5(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/1749-7221-5-11

  4. http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aging-estrogen-progesterone.shtml

  5. Samuels, M. H., & McDaniel, P. A. (1997). Thyrotropin levels during hydrocortisone infusions that mimic fasting- induced cortisol elevations: A clinical research center study. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 82(11), 3700–3704. http://doi.org/10.1210/jcem.82.11.4376

Scar tissue - is it an issue?

Is scar tissue really an issue? Alongside myself, scars may be one of the most under appreciated and neglected structures, when it comes to assessing aspects of an individual's pain and movement limitations.   For many people, which include physicians, surgeons and often the owners of said scars, there’s an acceptance that the scar has healed and is not involved in any process of pain, strength or movement dysfunction. Dr’s and surgeons often assume that time enables optimal healing and patients simply forget about the previous trauma. Time may be a great healer but the healing is only partial - the nervous system always remembers. Writing this, reminds me of a client who had filled in all historical injury and trauma that he had experienced on my intake forms, which might have been a factor in his chronic back pain. It wasn’t until he took his top off and under questioning revealed that he had  donated his kidney to his brother some twenty years ago. It wasn't a big deal though as it was twenty years ago apparently.

This sequence of events has been summarised as homeostatic, inflammation, granulation and remodelling phases (1) which are undergoing symbiotic relationships with other structures and dependant on energetic, endocrine and other functions of the individual, which often depend on environmental stimulus. During the granulation and proliferation phase, sub-phases, which include collagen deposition, remodelling of blood vessels and tissues occur. It’s likely that during these phases the health and energetic response of the individual will dictate the capacity to regenerate and may also influence the layers of dysfunction that are present with scar tissue.

“ In childhood, wounds heal quickly and inflammation is resolved, in extreme age, or during extreme stress or starvation, wound healing is much slower and the nature of inflammation and would closure is different. “Ray Peat.

Unsaturated vegetable fats, serotonin and estrogen promote collagen synthesis and resulting fibrosis and keloid scars are associated with these states (3). Perhaps the capacity to organise energy and regenerate are instrumental in decreasing the associated dysfunctions that can be found in all scar tissue? Most Drs that I have spoken to just assume that after 12 weeks the scar has generally healed and that normally activity can be resumed. As a rule, there is no thought given to mechanical, pain sensitising or emotional constraints induced by the presence of the scar. It’s generally accepted that most scars have 80% tensile strength of the previous structure, but again might that too be a product of the quality of healing available to the individual?

“ The amount of disorganised fibrous material formed in injured tissue is variable and depends on state of the individual and tissue situation. “

In hypothyroidism, high levels of the pituitary hormone TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) are known to stimulate fibrosis (1) Maintaining adequate thyroid hormone production promotes DNA transcription, optimal energy production, carbon dioxide production and probably decreases the proliferative effects of 'estrogenic' states that can be attributed to keloid scar formation.

The bigger the scar, the more likely the associated dysfunction? Perhaps the more disorganised tissue that exists, the increased likelihood of fuzziness between the central nervous system and output to structures associated with that scar. In scar tissue that has not been assessed or treated, it's relatively easy to induce weakness or stress to the surrounding tissues by a variety of stimulus which might include thinking and different types of pain,  touch or vectors of stretch that create neurological chaos or threat to to the individual.

Good therapy should allow for conversations between the clinician and patient that create stimulus that may (or may not) affect the output of surrounding structures associated with the scar. Poor feedback mediated by the scar might involve the following:

Emotional: Aspects of recall of the event that the individual finds upsetting.

Nociception/pain: First and second pain, visual or auditory, crude/fine touch, tickle/itch temperature, stress or recall od suffering responses to stimulus. (Involve pain feedback related to spinothalamic, spinotectal, spinohypothalamic and spinomesencephalic tracts)

Mechanical: Pressure, rebound, stretch, joint mechanoreceptors and other responses to tissue and structures. (Related to Golgi, Pacini, Ruffini and other dorsal column feedback pathways.)

Improving the optimal healing of scar tissue might involve aspects such as adequate carbohydrate, proteins, sunlight (or red light), carbon dioxide, thyroid, progesterone, vitamin A and E. Avoiding phytoestrogens and low carbohydrate diets would also be prudent.

Despite optimised nutrition and endocrine function, it’s likely that many scars leave some artefact that prevents the nervous system communicating with tissues. C - sections, episiotomies, appendectomies, laparoscopies and most surgeries, injuries or trauma leave a trace that needs to be resolved with the right therapy. Inhibition can be purposeful but restoration might need a little nudge from therapies like proprioceptive deep tendon reflex (P-DTR).

References:

  1. Kim, D., Kim, W., Joo, S. K., Bae, J. M., Kim, J. H., & Ahmed, A. (2018). Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Low-Normal Thyroid Function Are Associated With Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis and Fibrosis. Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, 16(1), 123–131.e1. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cgh.2017.08.014

  2. https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1298129-overview?pa=1ZDxXAnEOeNV9BUnYezdYpt49YJzASbxEvvw80YIDjlelzZDQj3XLvbI0V2MbTq%2FX8MwC0EECwzp432Skuf9qw%3D%3D

  3. http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/regeneration-degeneration.shtml

Can a bad smell create pain, dysfunction and weakness?

We know about the feedback of pain and painful stimulus (nociception) and the creation of pain to warn us but what about the effects of noxious and more subtle smells on the nervous system? Over the last few years I have found that nothing ceases to amaze me when it comes to the human body. As it becomes possible to dissect systems and assess interactions of specific stimulus, observing the input/output relationship between stimulus and body. Pain stimulus is observed to be chemical, thermal or mechanical in nature. Please bear with the technicalities before I explain the simplified mechanisms or skip to the last part of the blog, if you get bored!

There are many factors that contribute to a patient’s perception and physical feeling of pain. Pain is the central nervous systems response to an event that has the capacity to injure the tissues of the body. Nociception or pain can be qualified from the following pathways.

The ‘First’ pain is usually a withdrawal mechanism (Nociceptive Withdrawal Reflex or NRA) mediated by the neurotransmitter glutamate and utilises the neospinalthalmic (new pain) tract in the anterolateral system or ALS. This typically lasts less than 0.1 of a second and the signal, suggested to be dampened in the substantia gelatinosa, an area found in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. Think about that sharp initial pain experienced causing you to move away from a stimulus, which has been detected by free nerve endings.                               Smelly pain

The ‘Second’ pain is also part of the ALS but is part of the paleospinalthalmic tract (old pain). It typically takes over from the initial first pain/neo. It is mediated by the compound substance P and can be associated with that long, lingering pain experienced from an injury.

In addition to pain, we have the capacity to assess many other features of mechanical distortion such as pressure, stretch and touch. The Dorsal Column Medial Lemniscus or DCML, allows the nervous system to provide adequate feedback to tasks and environmental stimulus.

Another part of the pain detection system is the trigeminal chemosensory system, which has nociceptive/pain and temperature pathways that feedback to cranial nerve five, called the Trigeminal nerve (CNV). When a noxious or toxic substance is processed by the neurons in the mucosal areas of the nose, mouth, eyes and lips it is relayed into the thalamus. The VPMN (or ventral posterior medial nucleus) relays signals to the sensory cortex and provides responses, such as watery eyes, sneezing and withdrawal

When we inspire air with small particles of pollutants, they pass from the lungs into the blood stream. Although the blood brain barrier is supposed to prevent any unwanted chemicals, crossing from the blood to the brain; the Circumventricular organs present an area that does not have the capacity to restrict compounds that can create dis-organisation of neurological signals entering and leaving the brain. The area postrema, also has a chemosensory role to initiate vomiting to deal with exposure to harmful compounds

So let’s have something a little easier on the eyes and brain to read now. For example:

Perhaps you are walking across the road in heavy traffic. Sucking up all the pollutants such as benzene, carbon monoxide and other waste products of burning fossil fuels into your lungs as you find your way from one side of the road to another.

For a few seconds your brain, exposed to the onslaught of pollution, has a hard time processing the compounds that have made their way into areas such as the pineal gland or chemoreceptors that can induce vomiting in response to a noxious stimulus.

You are in a rush and bump into someone, his or her shoulder hitting you firmly in the chest. It was slightly painful but you don’t really notice it, the pain pathway, along with pressure, stretch and touch receptors provided some form of feedback. The brain, perhaps still not capable of processing this feedback due to the short exposure of increased pollutants, is just trying to get on with the milieu of everything else that your body demands of it.

Meanwhile the pectoralis muscle, which is being used with each step that you take, has been exposed to increased pressure, a state of contraction or small window of pain that necessitated a withdrawal reflex. The intrafusal muscle fiber that monitor both stretch and contraction now have increased signal towards sustained contraction due to the chaos of external compounds that entered areas of the brain.

So now we might have some level of muscle dysfunction. We probably don’t even know about it. That level of muscle dysfunction now increases and decreases tension demands to receptors found in the ligaments and tendons. The joint mechanoreceptors have a different signal. The skin exteroreceptors perhaps have a different signal. There’s no pain to remind us of the event. In fact we have now gone to the gym and started doing a bunch of push-ups or gone shopping for food and simply carrying the bag home with that hand and shoulder. This doesn’t create pain, but simply sets the foundation for increased areas of dysfunction from distorted neurological signalling.

The concept of this neurological/chemical chaos is often referred to as ‘brain fog’. It seems to be in the literature for many reasons, blood sugar issues, gluten, estrogen (PMS and menopausal females are particularly susceptible) and other factors. It’s also possible that brain fog can be created from specific food stressors, once again eliciting the same response, proposed in the heavy traffic.

Some might say, how can the body be so fragile? Surely we are more robust than that? But it is possible to create these specific dysfunctions but they can be unravelled. Understanding specific stimulus can give us a solution to what dysfunction exits. We might never find out how it came about but a thorough history taking can help to influence where we assess and how to treat it. This is where a technique like P-DTR or Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex, developed by Dr Jose Palomar is unique and effective at uncovering specific neurological dysfunction.

If emotions, visual, auditory, mechanical, chemical and pain factors perpetuate dysfunction, then using those stimulus can pose an effective form of assessment and treatment.

  1. Palomar, J. Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex: Course Notes.
  2. Purves D et al Neuroscience 5th edition. Sinauer Associates 2012
  3. http://www.neurology.org/content/77/12/1198.short

Why baby walkers are a disaster for the growing child.

Why baby walkers are a disaster for the growing child. It was the fourth client in the space of two weeks that prompted me to write this quick blog. Four teenagers all aged 14 with pain and compromised movement. Where did it all start? How does this happen? The parents enquire, looking for a definitive reason.  walker-clipart-baby_in_walker

As with all aetiologies of pain and movement dysfunction it can be hard to determine exactly what drives an individual’s problems. But when you can observe the way that a young person breathes you can, in most cases determine whether they have been placed in a baby walker, without any other form of assessment.

A rough overview would reveal that, within the first 9 months of movement and prior to the process of standing (verticalisation) there are many key stages of development that need to occur.

These include.

  • Lifting the head
  • Stabilising the back line between neck, chest and pelvis
  • Rotation via rolling
  • Quadra pedal or four point stance
  • Crawling and cross patterning of shoulder to hip.

So why is it that the baby walker is such a problem?

Consider the actions that a baby needs to achieve before it stands, let alone walks. Crawling develops hip, trunk and shoulder musculature. Due to the reciprocal relationship between the neck and the lower back, which counter rotates to the direction of the thoracic spine, optimal conditioning of reflexes, muscles, tendons and ligaments should occur. If a child is placed into a walker, the challenge is then geared towards locomotion and gait, rather than rolling and crawling. This is where the problems start and it presents several issues to consider.

  1. The ability to stabilise using the diaphragm is decreased due to in an early standing position, that is not conditioned enough from crawling. (observation can be made by the upper breathing pattern, using chest and neck muscles)
  2. The lower leg muscles are stressed to create movement and in particular the calve muscles are strengthened and may contribute to excessively to actions such as hip and knee flexion and extension (as well as many other movements. (look for those over developed calve muscles)
  3. The lack of rotation created by a lack of motion in the spine, decreases essential loading of the spinal ligaments, which will decrease recruitment of the muscles needed for optimal gait. (you can see poor movement and stability from the most basic movements)

Another insult added into the equation is the constant use of flip-flops. This previous blog breaks down why flip-flops are disastrous for athletic and day-to-day performance.

To develop optimal movement that progresses throughout childhood into adult life, rolling, crawling and walking patterns should not be supported with baby walkers or bouncers. It might be hard to believe but the walker does play a significant part to why younger clients present with pain and movement issues. There's no doubt that technology has significant benefits it many aspects of life. But when it comes to human movement, the brain already has it optimised, you just need to let it of its own thing.

Thankfully with a little work, the problems can be unravelled but don’t get me started on the use of iPads and mobile phones!!

References:

Kobesova, A., Kolar, P., Developmental kinesiology: Three levels of motor control in the assessment and treatment of the motor system, Journal of Bodywork & Movement Therapies (2013),

Kolar, P. et al. Postural Function of the Diaphragm in Persons With and Without Chronic Low Back Pain. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2012;42(4):352-

 

Skin deep? The role of skin in motor control and dysfunction.

Many people are aware that dysfunction can occur from many different areas. Scar tissue, joint and ligament/tendon receptors, muscle fibres and many more factors contribute to pain and movement issues. The role of skin in providing feedback is not so prevalent in literature or discussed as a source of a client’s motor control, pain or dysfunction issues. Whilst muscle and joint receptors are well known as proprioceptors, the skin contains a large amount of feedback from exteroreceptors originally proposed by Sherrington. These include:

Meissner – vibrationskin copy

Pacinian- vibration

Ruffini - pressure response

Krause – pressure in mucosal tissues

Merkel - pressure/touch to skin

Free nerve endings – nociceptive/pain stimulation

The skin provides feedback from external stimulus, adjusting steps and movement. Damage to the skin can be one of the many areas that clients often forget and for that matter, surgeries such as appendectomies, c –sections and kidney removal are just a few of the ‘small’ procedures that have not been mentioned in an initial session.

Deep abrasions on young tissue, which heal and visually, present little to see on an adult body, are common. A recent finding with a client was a certain amount of dysfunction between a deep unseen scar from falling from a bike 20 years ago playing havoc with the scar tissue and stability of   the same knee from a later ACL reconstruction. Using techniques such as PDTR (proprioceptive deep tendon reflex) and NKT (neuro kinetic therapy) it is possible to assess the impact of scars, seen or unseen on stability and motor control of muscle and ligamentous tissue.

Another common issue is the role of deep coloured tattoos and their impact on surrounding muscle tissue via skin receptor dysfunction. Usually dysfunction between quick pin tracts (Neospinalthalmic tracts) and slower pain (Paleospinalthalamic tracts) are prevalent with tattoos but depending on depth and other factors, dysfunction can present via the receptors suggested above.

Tattoos can create dysfunction in underlying and other tissues

 

Addressing muscular dysfunction can be useful and effective as part of the treatment but in addition to assessment of joint, ligament, tendon and pain pathways; assessment of the skin and its associated receptors should be an integral part of the client’s treatment.

 

References:

Palomar, J. Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex. Course manual.

Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, et al. Neuroscience 2nd edition.

Sinauer Associates 2001.

Bin the flip-flops for better performance

I have worked with thousands of clients over the years and one of the most consistent links that I can say with certainty exists, is the link between biomechanical dysfunction from flip flop wearing. You can also lump tight shoes, high heels and other rogue foot wear that simply do not allow the feet to function correctly in that description. What I am not saying is that you can never wear those shoes that you hold so dear to your heart again. What I am saying is; that if you are engaged in an exercise regime, be it professional or someone who wants to get the best from your training regime, without injury or decreases in performance. Ditching those pesky flip-flops and other gait restrictors are probably a good idea.

If you want to wear them, then doing some kind of releases that address your own personal restrictions is key. This flip-flop release is very useful but not complete.

https://youtu.be/y1a6W86Yp8I

With the twenty-six bones, thirty-three joints and over one hundred muscles and ligaments, each person demonstrates their personal movement and dysfunction in slightly different ways.

I can tell straight away, when a client walks in whether they wear flip-flops, tight work shoes or over used high heels. So what are the common issues that I see?

  • Inability to optimally recruit the hip and thigh (glutes/hip flexors/quads/hamstrings) muscles.
  • Restriction in mobility/stability to the neck.
  • Poor core function due to overuse of the back muscles.
  • Calf strain and usually a decrease in shin muscle contracture
  • Instability of the big toe-essential for push off in gait
  • Permanent contraction of the toes

There are others and many clients often look at me like a madman as I say that their problems are coming from their footwear. Usually the improvement in function and decrease in pain relatively quickly is enough to ensure their compliance to restricting problematic footwear and addressing their muscular problems with some foot TLC homework.

From a muscular and myofascial line Myers proposition of the structural connectivity via superficial  back line the superficial back line can show us how muscular and ligamentous issues in the feet might affect the whole line where the muscles are continuous with the cranial fascia. Addressing the foot has often decreased pain and increased mobility in the neck in many clients.

A long-standing client of mine who is a competitive swimmer was reminded of the implications of flip-flop wearing and performance. Originally a back pain client that was cleared, he was complaining of a lack of ability to complete a six beat stroke with his feet. After clearing the distortion of the peripheral and central nervous system and restoring optimal muscle function (Using NKT or Neuro Kinetic Therapy and Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex/PDTR), he reported a return of the function that night.

Whether exercising or just for moving efficiently you can still wear these shoes but just be aware that there is a cost. To remove the dysfunction you will need to do corrective work and more homework and lets be honest for those that do exercise, correctives are adistraction from the main event. More mobility and stability work? Come on!

Well if you just treated those feet with more respect you wouldn’t need too.

 

What is regional interdependence?

What is regional interdependence and why do we need to know more about it? History is often the most prevalent factor for the exposure to future injuries. Many clients and surprisingly clinicians are often blissfully unaware of the impact of previous injuries on current and future injury scenarios. Here are five key examples of actual clients that I have worked with.

  1. Left sided lower back pain, not resolved with surgery, from 40 year-old scar, left by kidney removal at the age of 1.
  2. Ankle injury causing lower back pain.
  3. Appendectomy scar, decreasing core function, causing lower back pain.
  4. Ear piercing creating shoulder dysfunction on the opposite shoulder.
  5. Hyper –contracted toe muscles creating mobility issues in neck.

Of course there are more, hundreds, perhaps thousands more. For the evidence medicine biased people, I am not about to create theoretical models for you to shoot down with a lack of scientific literature. Although there are increasing studies that support the rationale for regional interdependence. There are also many methods of assessment that create adequate reasoning to show how restriction, lack of stability and dysfunction in one area of the body may have a significant impact on other areas of the body. SFMA (selective functional movement assessment), Gray institute, Anatomy in Motion and many other forms of assessment provide insights to how a lack of mobility and stability at the ankle has an impact on say mechanics of the knee, hip, spine, shoulder and head.

Many practitioners and clinicians have often been taught to view each issue in isolation, which to a degree can be helpful; As local problems can often be responsible for a global issue. Think a scar, such as a C-section, inhibiting core function, increasing dysfunction in the posterior chain not addressed by anterior chain function. But what about when symptoms persist? True, there are many factors that can contribute to pain and dysfunction that simply will not be addressed by massage/trigger points, needles and corrective exercise and I might suggest that some gains may serve as mask to the actual underlying dysfunction.

 

10264312_699027360144587_8762295179813694115_nYou may have observed the concept of regional interdependence after having a good calf massage. Ever noticed how good your neck feels after having your feet and calf massaged? There’s a clear fascial line between the feet and the neck as proposed by Myers in the superficial back line. There is also literature to support the concept of viscerosomatic pain referrals. This may include pre menstrual issues on back pain or gastro-intestinal dysfunction involved in headaches. To address these dysfunctions truly we need to get to the root cause of the issues. That neck often gets tight again after having those feet massaged as the compensatory muscles are overworking for an underworking area.

If perhaps the calf muscles are overworking due to a lack of function in their antagonistic muscles such as the dorsi-flexors or shin muscles. You may well see the neck tightness dissipate, when this relationship is addressed. Follow up mobility work may also be useful for the neck.

Determining mobility versus stability issues is paramount. A decrease in mobility may come from many sources such as:

  • A lack of stability -( how to determine video)
  • Breathing pattern dysfunction (a stability issue)
  • Biochemical – vitamin D/K2/A/calcium factors
  • Gluten –stiff person syndrome, A tentative link between the consumption of gluten and muscle stiffness.

Here we can see the futile task of mobilising joints via releasing and stretching muscles, when there exists factors that contribute to the lack of mobility, that will not resolve with mobilisations.

It’s important for the patient to bring a complete injury history to the table and for the clinician to assess the impact and hierarchy of all factors. Determining mobility against stability factors, improving motor control and treating via the suggestion of regional interdependence may be more beneficial than simply just treating overworked painful areas.

 

References:

 

  1. Cook, G et al. SFMA Course Manual. 2011
  2. Hadjivassiliou M1, Aeschlimann D, Grünewald RA, Sanders DS, Sharrack B, Woodroofe N. GAD antibody-associated neurological illness and its relationship to gluten sensitivity. Acta Neurol Scand. 2011 Mar;123(3):175-80. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0404.2010.01356.x
  3. Myers. T. Anatomy Trains. Elsevier. 2014.
  4. Sueki D. G., Cleland J. A., Wainner R. S. A regional interdependence model of musculoskeletal dysfunction: research, mechanisms, and clinical implications. Journal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy. 2013;21(2):90–102. doi: 10.1179/2042618612y.0000000027

Latest Dubai Eye Interview: Longevity, pain relief, movement and well being

Working with Amna

In the past few months I have had the pleasure of working with Amna Al Haddad. She is a motivated, strong woman with a goal of training for the 2016 Olympics in Rio. When I first met Amna she was a little disappointed with her progress and felt like she had hit a wall with her training. Initially the goal was to tweak her energy levels by analysing her metabolic rate and modifying diet to get the optimal amount of energy, to improve performance. When people participate at high level sports they can often become very strong through compensatory mechanisms. Using bio-mechanical assessments and motor control evaluations such as SFMA and Neuro Kinetic Therapy, we were able to change the way that Amna's nervous system communicated with the appropriate muscles and present some strategies that kept them optimal.

Understanding the difference between mobility versus stability issues is key.This ensures that movement remains great and injuries are reduced.

It's been great to see Amna hit some new PB's and stay motivated for her goals ahead. Really looking forward to see her excel over the next few years as it has been a pleasure working with someone so motivated to achieve their targets.

Amna's face book page 

"Working with Keith in the past few months have been absolutely great. My performance, energy levels, and stability definitely increased after our treatment sessions. My muscles have been compensating a lot, often causing a lot of dysfunction and irritation that has affected my weightlifting and strength levels.Keith understands the human body in a different way than what I have seen before from a performance consultant; he can immediately show you how to activate a muscle and restore its strength, reduce pain, and more in just a few seconds! BUT..you have to do your homework to reinforce the new movement patterns."  Amna Al Haddad, UAE national Olympic Weightlifter

 

51

Nutrition and Exercise dogma

Dogma creation If you haven't yet met someone who has recommended you either some form of diet or a type of exercise, you are unique, in fact a real rarity, and somewhat lucky.

The fitness and wellness industry is awash with much dogma, often created by short term ideologies, that in long term may be harmful to ones health. A friend sent me a link to a simple yet effective graph from Keith Norris's blog  on chasing performance goals and their impact on health.  This got me thinking about the fields that I work in and how much of the recommendations are riddled with dogma and lack critical thought processes.

There's often a reason for this dogma existing and for many it is due to the anecdotal gains that can be experienced in the short term. Here are just a few reasons why:

  • High carb to low carb
  • Eating grains to not eating grains
  • High meat eater to vegetarian
  • Sedentary to high intensity exercise
  • Modern SAD to Paleo
  • Regular diet to juicing

There are plenty more and the point to be made is, some positive gains can be made in the short term, change to metabolic markers, restriction in excessive calories, weight loss and a variety of other markers. From the diagram above you can observe that whenever there is a change to the input of a system, change can occur and especially when there has been little variance in the past. As change occurs and an almost linear increase in perceived health markers also occur, a Zone of Optimisation and resultant dogma often ensue.

'This really worked for me, and it will do for you, trust me!'

Is the problem for many people, those often short term gains, on the way up on your performance curve, may actually start falling sooner than you think.

For the performance exerciser, poor movement, compensation and ultimately pain will ensue.

For those to the new diet, great results could  turn into stagnation, weight gain and a host of metabolic disturbances.

Is it working for you? Well do you:

  • Have good digestion?
  • Have deep restorative sleep?
  • Balanced energy?
  • Healthy libido?
  • Balanced emotions
  • Good stress response

If you don't, you may just be coming down from that peak of physiological and biochemical gains. When might it happen, 1, 2 or even 5 years down the line perhaps?  Hysteresis or a systems memory can be changed with ease if there exists, little underlying metabolic damage and a reduction of factors that increase resistance to repair  that system. Supporting metabolic processes should be first and foremost.

Understanding that fitness is not always a healthy pursuit and paying attention to markers that increase vitality should be a goal, and be pursuant to any fitness goal.

Move, play, eat, digest and sleep well.

 

Old injuries and new pain?

Image-1 (2) Most people don't associate long term injuries that are often asymptomatic with current levels of pain. This single case study is a great way of demonstrating just how this can occur.

Brief history of client-34 year old rugby player presenting with recurrent achilles pain despite long term physio. A great case of lifitis as somebody reminded me about my own injuries recently! Two ruptured biceps over the last decade and neck injuries to boot. Presented with inhibited bilateral hamstrings, right lat, neck extensors and left rectus femoris and quadricep (hip and thigh muscles) inhibited. Also poor dorsi flexion (raising the foot from the floor) inhibited by his calf muscles. His thoroca-lumbar fascia, the piece of tissue that connects the glutes and lats was holding a lot of tension and contributing to a poor link between these two powerful muscles.

Compensation can take many forms. For example with this case the client was usiing his diaphragm to help stabilise other joints in his body that was not balanced with the pelvic floor and TVA (transversus abdominis or hoop like muscle that is a key player in spinal and segmental stability)

After testing and re-activating the muscles that were inhibited using NKT (TM) the muscles, I taped the right to left posterior oblique sling as you can see in the picture, with great results. The tape acts as a conduit for proprioception or communication between this key sling. Client has been free of achilles pain despite training heavily during pre season rugby training.tape Posterior oblique sling

Analysis in the form of SFMA selective functional movement assessment and re-establishing neural pathways through the use of NKT, appropriate treatment and exercise have ensured that this client got out of pain most effectively and the interesting part...I didn't touch his heel to get rid of the pain! To find out how to get pain free, moving and grooving get in touch to find out more.

Shoulder pain...which one?

Shoulder pain is one of the most Image-1common musculoskeletal issues that I see in my practice from week to week. Its easily as common as neck, lower back, hip and knee pain. So why is shoulder joint dysfunction so common? Well from the lay view, most people intepret shoulder pain as a rotator cuff issue, usually stemming from increased medial rotation. Common thoughts are that the use of the computer mouse, impact on this postural problem.

Too much bench press, throwing, ipad playing, racket or club, bat sports or anything that contibutes to excessive internal, external rotation, protraction, retraction, elevation or depressing of the shoulder joint and girdle and other actions will contibute to shoulder pain. Impingement syndrome is probably one of the most common shoulder problems.

Often external rotation exercises are utilised to combat these problems, often ineffectively. Determining whether the issue is one of mobility or stability and motor control should dictate which modality of therapy should be used together and the type of movement should be dictated by the dysfunction of each of the four joints of the shoulder.

Paul CHEK used the term slave joint to decribe any articulation below C2 (2nd cervical vertebrae) as a term to describe the vulnerability afforded to any joint that could be affected by heirachical factors such as breathing, atlas ( 1st cervical), vision, jaw and others that could influence lower joints such as the shoulder. Whilst this is a particularly useful model to bear in mind, both local and global dysfunction often effect the shoulder joint in isolation or together, from the head down or the foot up.

More often than not dysfunction in the opposite ankle can increase the facilitation of shoulder muscles. A lack of dorsi flexion or movement of the ankle which raises the whole foot off the ground whilst keeping the heel on the floor, can be a common feature in shoulder dysfunction. treating the shoulder may be the last thing that needs to be acheived in restoring shoulder function and decreasing pain.

Restoring shoulder mechanics need not be lengthy periods of shoulder rehab. Identify the cullprits involved in over working, rewire the ones that don't work enough, and create a stimulus that holds that pattern.

If you have shoulder pain and all people ever do is look at your shoulder, ask them to take a look at your ankle, breathing pattern, neck just in case they need a nudge in the right direction.