rehabilitation

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

Sunlight, Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation I first became interested in the healing qualities of light about 5 years ago after reading From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in Context by Ray Peat. The obvious connotations to improved health during summer compared to a so- called Seasonal Affective Disorder or SAD was well known. The mechanics were intriguing but not limited to the obvious features of Ultra Violet light and the production of Vitamin D.

UV has been known to be problematic and excess, increases ageing of the skin but the mechanisms and links to cancer are misunderstood. An incomplete overview of other potential mechanisms that might promote mutogenic or cancerous processes are often left out of the explanation. The business of sunblock marketing, like many other fear mongering industries, continue to warn us of too much sunlight, yet often we often lack the right amount. An old blog highlights some points relating to this. The qualities of the healing properties of light are often glossed over instead of promoting the optimal rays of the sun..

The light which penetrates deeply into our tissues (mainly orange and red light) is able to improve the efficiency of energy production, and to suppress the toxic free-radicals that are always being formed in cells. “

Consideration of the healing properties of certain wavelengths of light is a must for health, metabolic and rehabilitation promotion. The useOrange and red rays of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades. In 1903 a Nobel science prize was awarded to Niels Finsen for ultraviolet-phototherapy.

Low Level Laser Therapy and Photobiomodulation

The use of light therapy for improving pain, healing and many other issues has been used for decades.

Here are just some of the issues that have seen great improvement using LLLT and Photobiomodulation.

  • Pain reduction
  • Improved hormone function
  • Swelling reduction
  • Increased healing
  • Neurological issues
  • Improved cellular function
  • Promote recovery from exercise
  • Rehabilitation of injuries
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Improved hair follicle stimulation

The use of infra red heat lamps have been used for decades and often been recommended in rehabilitation or in the beauty world as an anti-aging protocol. I have used heat lamps with myself and clients for several years but it is clear that many gains can be had without the use of heat and just focusing on the use of light alone.

There are many factors that can make the use of light more effective and these illumination parameters include:

  • Wavelength
  • Fluence
  • Power density
  • Pulse structure
  • Timing

For many, even finding these variables may prove a difficult task. In fact even using the word Photobiomodulation becomes problematic! I think the exposure of bright light during the day through incandescent or LED lights is important to offset the lack of natural daylight and healing properties of various waveforms, (unless of course you do work or spend much of your day outside) with the use of red light after sunset to decrease impact to circadian rhythm.

One of the most prevalent mechanisms that appears to offer an explanation as to LLLT’s effectiveness is by increasing cytochrome c oxidase which improves mitochondrial function, increasing cell efficiency and function and improving energy production.

The wavelength of 600-950nm or optical window is a general guideline and appears to be where most of the research and the effects of LLLT has been conducted on. The toxinless website listed below has some great recommendations for the use of light and ideal set ups, which are very cheap to set up at home.

The use of LLLT for improving hormones and in particular thyroid function has gained a greater following of late. It’s worth noting, that in some studies which can be found on Valtsu’s website (a great resource for thyroid) , the use of LLLT improved thyroid function without the need for thyroid medication. Additional studies corroborate the effectiveness in reducing the need for thyroid medication and addressing autoimmune thyroiditis.  Therefore I think the use of LLLT for improving energy, digestion, mood and sleep is validated.

References:

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause : Female Hormones in Context. 1997.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22747309

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12804422

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26048721

Online resources:

http://valtsus.blogspot.fi/2015/09/hypothyroidism-could-it-be-treated-with.html

http://www.toxinless.com/red-light

http://www.photobiology.info/Hamblin.html

 

 

 

 

Skin deep? The role of skin in motor control and dysfunction.

Many people are aware that dysfunction can occur from many different areas. Scar tissue, joint and ligament/tendon receptors, muscle fibres and many more factors contribute to pain and movement issues. The role of skin in providing feedback is not so prevalent in literature or discussed as a source of a client’s motor control, pain or dysfunction issues. Whilst muscle and joint receptors are well known as proprioceptors, the skin contains a large amount of feedback from exteroreceptors originally proposed by Sherrington. These include:

Meissner – vibrationskin copy

Pacinian- vibration

Ruffini - pressure response

Krause – pressure in mucosal tissues

Merkel - pressure/touch to skin

Free nerve endings – nociceptive/pain stimulation

The skin provides feedback from external stimulus, adjusting steps and movement. Damage to the skin can be one of the many areas that clients often forget and for that matter, surgeries such as appendectomies, c –sections and kidney removal are just a few of the ‘small’ procedures that have not been mentioned in an initial session.

Deep abrasions on young tissue, which heal and visually, present little to see on an adult body, are common. A recent finding with a client was a certain amount of dysfunction between a deep unseen scar from falling from a bike 20 years ago playing havoc with the scar tissue and stability of   the same knee from a later ACL reconstruction. Using techniques such as PDTR (proprioceptive deep tendon reflex) and NKT (neuro kinetic therapy) it is possible to assess the impact of scars, seen or unseen on stability and motor control of muscle and ligamentous tissue.

Another common issue is the role of deep coloured tattoos and their impact on surrounding muscle tissue via skin receptor dysfunction. Usually dysfunction between quick pin tracts (Neospinalthalmic tracts) and slower pain (Paleospinalthalamic tracts) are prevalent with tattoos but depending on depth and other factors, dysfunction can present via the receptors suggested above.

Tattoos can create dysfunction in underlying and other tissues

 

Addressing muscular dysfunction can be useful and effective as part of the treatment but in addition to assessment of joint, ligament, tendon and pain pathways; assessment of the skin and its associated receptors should be an integral part of the client’s treatment.

 

References:

Palomar, J. Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex. Course manual.

Purves D, Augustine GJ, Fitzpatrick D, et al. Neuroscience 2nd edition.

Sinauer Associates 2001.

Bin the flip-flops for better performance

I have worked with thousands of clients over the years and one of the most consistent links that I can say with certainty exists, is the link between biomechanical dysfunction from flip flop wearing. You can also lump tight shoes, high heels and other rogue foot wear that simply do not allow the feet to function correctly in that description. What I am not saying is that you can never wear those shoes that you hold so dear to your heart again. What I am saying is; that if you are engaged in an exercise regime, be it professional or someone who wants to get the best from your training regime, without injury or decreases in performance. Ditching those pesky flip-flops and other gait restrictors are probably a good idea.

If you want to wear them, then doing some kind of releases that address your own personal restrictions is key. This flip-flop release is very useful but not complete.

https://youtu.be/y1a6W86Yp8I

With the twenty-six bones, thirty-three joints and over one hundred muscles and ligaments, each person demonstrates their personal movement and dysfunction in slightly different ways.

I can tell straight away, when a client walks in whether they wear flip-flops, tight work shoes or over used high heels. So what are the common issues that I see?

  • Inability to optimally recruit the hip and thigh (glutes/hip flexors/quads/hamstrings) muscles.
  • Restriction in mobility/stability to the neck.
  • Poor core function due to overuse of the back muscles.
  • Calf strain and usually a decrease in shin muscle contracture
  • Instability of the big toe-essential for push off in gait
  • Permanent contraction of the toes

There are others and many clients often look at me like a madman as I say that their problems are coming from their footwear. Usually the improvement in function and decrease in pain relatively quickly is enough to ensure their compliance to restricting problematic footwear and addressing their muscular problems with some foot TLC homework.

From a muscular and myofascial line Myers proposition of the structural connectivity via superficial  back line the superficial back line can show us how muscular and ligamentous issues in the feet might affect the whole line where the muscles are continuous with the cranial fascia. Addressing the foot has often decreased pain and increased mobility in the neck in many clients.

A long-standing client of mine who is a competitive swimmer was reminded of the implications of flip-flop wearing and performance. Originally a back pain client that was cleared, he was complaining of a lack of ability to complete a six beat stroke with his feet. After clearing the distortion of the peripheral and central nervous system and restoring optimal muscle function (Using NKT or Neuro Kinetic Therapy and Proprioceptive Deep Tendon Reflex/PDTR), he reported a return of the function that night.

Whether exercising or just for moving efficiently you can still wear these shoes but just be aware that there is a cost. To remove the dysfunction you will need to do corrective work and more homework and lets be honest for those that do exercise, correctives are adistraction from the main event. More mobility and stability work? Come on!

Well if you just treated those feet with more respect you wouldn’t need too.

 

The difference between mobility and stability issues

Do you have an injury that keeps reoccurring? Finding the difference between mobility and stability issues can be the key to eradicating pain for good If you have ever suffered from an injury and there was no difference made between a mobility or a stability issue. Chances are you may still have the injury.

You often see many trainers and therapists focusing on mobility, mobility and more mobility. Release this muscle with that foam roller release the fascia with this ball but unless the distinction is made between whether a mobility drill or stability training or re-programming of the nervous system needs to occur, All you will end up with is one mobile injured body. It’s a simple thing to do. Just determine whether the movement can be conducted through the desired range. If it can’t, the question should be asked can this be done passively, with someone else guiding you through the movement. If the answer is yes. You have a stability or motor control dysfunction.

If you are the one of many going through the insurance/treatment mill or simply not getting any resolve from massage, exercise or whatever therapy that you are undertaking. Don’t be scared to ask the person treating you…Do I have a mobility or stability issue? It will help to cut through all the fluff. .