wi-fi and health

Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - inheritance, environment and stress.

Estrogen excess.png

Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome - inheritance, environment and stress. Recently I took on a client who was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a slightly wayward insulin profile and the ‘best practice’ of oral contraceptives and Glucophage (metformin- blood sugar regulating drug) were suggested. My client had started bleeding daily and was informed that this was normal for three months but would help out with PCOS and weight gain. However this seemed at odds with my current knowledge and experience of biology and endocrinology. There are plenty of studies highlighting the diabetes inducing effects of estrogen and oral contraceptives.

Glycemia constitutes a fundamental homeostatic variable, and hence its alteration can lead to a number of pathophysiological conditions affecting the internal milieu of the human being. Since the early 1960s, the intake of oral contraceptives has been associated with an increased risk of developing disorders of glucose metabolism.(Cortés & Alfaro, 2014)

Is best practice the efforts of a global network of doctors or simply a corporate led strategy? Don’t get me wrong; the world is full of competent, passionate and well-meaning doctors who signed up to help others. But the concept of both best practice and clinical governance seem a utopian ideal when those that are responsible for drug development are companies whose primary function is to make as much money as possible, without appropriate direction.

Joseph Dumitt in his book Drugs for Life (2012) highlights that there hasn’t been a scientist at the head of a pharmaceutical company for many years and their direction being driven by economists and marketers. As there are many examples of absolutist statements regarding drugs and their positive effects on health that lack congruence over time, you’ll forgive me for sounding like a conspiracy theorist. How about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for better health despite its negative outcomes related to cardiovascular events or cancer? Or statin therapy for decreasing unnecessary risk factors based upon skewed data and early terminated trails with no public access to trial data (Lorgeril & Rabaeus, 2016)?

Back to PCOS. I have written previously about the effects of metformin and its use in gestational diabetes, and the problems it poses trans-generationally. It’s possible to suggest that the failure to act with appropriate biological interventions perpetuates the cycle of acquired traits from parents that are passed to offspring, treated ineffectively and generations of reproductive (and other tissues) tissue conditions continue without being resolved.

The biologist Jean Baptiste Lamarck's fourth law stated:

“ Everything which has been acquired..or changed in the organisation of an individual during its lifetime is preserved in the reproductive process and is transmitted to the next generation by those who experienced the alterations. “

It's worth pointing out that this is not isolated to the female of the species as the factors below have been shown to be instrumental in reproductive issues (testicular dysgenesis, hypospadias etc) in males.

The environment has been shown to be instrumental in the development of reproductive tissue disorders, diabetes and cancer but more emphasis is placed on the individual and their food choices rather than acknowledgement of industrial responsibility. Positive associations between levels of polychlorinated bisphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been confirmed in multivariate data analysis (Yang et al., 2015). Relationships between increases of luteinising hormone (LH) PCO, hyperandrogenism, annovulation, insulin resistance and pollutants are significant and may add to issues of detection, due to the subtle long term perturbations that often affect endocrine function. Stress, other pollutants and medications contribute to further problems that burden not only reproductive tissue but also other organizational hormones such as thyroid hormone.

PCOS is defined medically by the following: One of the main problems of treating PCOS with contraception is the many studies that clearly show a relationship between estrogen and decreased insulin sensitivity (Godsland et al., 1992)(Cortés & Alfaro, 2014). Progestin’s, the synthetic version of progesterone, also pose many problems but this has not deterred the inclusion of estrogen and progestin contraceptives as another inappropriate form of treatment. The burden of estrogen induced by the sources suggested above comes at a cost and it’s well known that an excess of estrogen can suppress thyroid function (thyroid is necessary for detoxification of estrogen and another organisational hormone progesterone.

Both thyroid and progesterone are known to improve insulin sensitivity and can create beneficial changes to disorganised tissue induced by an excess of estrogen. Thyroid nodules and uterine fibroids appear to be intimately linked by an excess of estrogen (Kim et al., 2010) and suppression of thyroid tumours can be achieved by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppression by thyroxin supplementation (Grussendorf, Reiners, Paschke, & Wegscheider, 2011). An old rambling on thyroid nodules and fibroids.


Breaking the cycle requires interventions that address inheritance, environment and individual stressors. Strategies that involve adequate nutrition that build biology not reduce it, use of protective compounds like progesterone, thyroid and adequate carbohydrate can be of great benefit. Although this stands in contrast to the best practice of contraception, blood sugar medication and poorly thought out nutritional advice of restricting carbohydrates. As the environment appears to drive most of the increasing numbers of issues like PCOS, it becomes important to increase robustness, restrict exposure to what we can control and become more adaptable to what we can’t.

To find out more about coaching for these issues.

References:

Burkhardt, R. W. (2013). Lamarck, evolution, and the inheritance of acquired characters. Genetics, 194(4), 793–805. http://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.113.151852

Cortés, M. E., & Alfaro, A. a. (2014). The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation. The Linacre Quarterly, 81(3), 209–218. http://doi.org/10.1179/2050854914Y.0000000023

Dumit, J. (2012). Drugs for Life. Duke University Press.

Godsland, I. F., Walton, C., Felton, C., Proudler, A., Patel, A., & Wynn, V. (1992). Insulin resistance, secretion, and metabolism in users of oral contraceptives. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 74(1), 64–70. http://doi.org/10.1210/jcem.74.1.1530790

Grussendorf, M., Reiners, C., Paschke, R., & Wegscheider, K. (2011). Reduction of thyroid nodule volume by levothyroxine and iodine alone and in combination: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96(9), 2786–2795. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-0356

Kim, M.-H., Park, Y. R., Lim, D.-J., Yoon, K.-H., Kang, M.-I., Cha, B.-Y., … Son, H.-Y. (2010). The relationship between thyroid nodules and uterine fibroids. Endocrine Journal, 57(7), 615–21. http://doi.org/10.1507/endocrj.K10E-024

Lorgeril, M. De, & Rabaeus, M. (2016). Beyond confusion and controversy, can we evaluate the real efficacy and safety of cholesterol-lowering with statins? Journal of Controversies in Biomedical Research, 1(1), 67. http://doi.org/10.15586/jcbmr.2015.11

How to improve sleep-wake cycles.

Do you need to improve sleep? Why is it that sometimes, with the best intentions of going to bed early, we either find ourselves struggling to enter a sleep cycle, or wake up, deep in the hours of darkness? The prominent stress researcher Robert Sapolsky (Why Zebras don’t Get Ulcers) writes fondly of his near death experiences, of little sleep from the arrival of his newborn child. It’s no surprise that security and intelligence operatives use a lack of sleep to disorientate prisoners. Just one nights lack of sleep from me and I will tell you anything! Despite the will to nod off, why is it that many people suffered from poor sleep, or struggle to enter sleep cycles?

Before I delve into some brief hormonal issues that can be manipulated to ensure a deeper sleep it’s worth noting that darkness itself is a stressful experience and we produce many restorative hormones during sleep to combat the metabolic stress of darkness. Therefore one essential component of adequate sleep is exposure to sunlight on a daily basis. This ensures uptake of vitamin D and exposure to the deeper penetrative orange and red lights, which help to restore metabolism and healing of cells. An old blog on light therapy.

Over the years I have found the following issues associated with poor sleep.

  • Low blood sugar levels
  • Increase in compounds of wakefulness
  • Exercise late at night
  • Excessive work stress/blue light exposure
  • Exposure to EMF-electromagnetic stress and Wi-Fi
  • Poor sleep and its vicious cycle
  • Emotional Stress

There are several models to be aware of when it comes to sleep theory and the phases of sleep are categorised as

NREM – Non rapid eye movement- pre REM sleep.

REM - Rapid eye movement- this is the deep restorative part of sleep Active wake

Neurotransmitters and hormones associated with sleep:

Acetylcholine – AcH is the neurotransmitter associated with Rapid Eye Movement or REM sleep.

Serotonin – 5HT this neurotransmitter along with HA is associated with wakefulness.

Norepinephrine/Noreadrenaline - Ne - Hormone of wakefulness.

Gammaminobutyric Acid – GABA. GABA’s role in sleep is well documented but levels vary depending on location of the brain. It’s role is known in decreasing wakefulness and also decreasing deeper REM sleep and involved in producing wakefulness. Histamine- HA involved in wakefulness.

Hypocretin Orexin- PCT /O Involved in wakefulness.

Adenosine- AD involved in entering NREM sleep.

Here is a rough depiction of key Neurotransmitters of REM and NREM sleep. Other neurotransmitters of wakefulness such as Histamine, Serotonin and noreadenaline (hormone) are not depicted but are elevated in waking state and should be lower during sleep cycles. It’s worth noting that the use of serotonin in mood related disorders such as depression is a key agent in insomnia like states.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common sleep disorders

Insomnia:  The inability to sleep restfully and I would categorise a good nights sleep from 6-9 hours depending on your own needs. The ability to enter deep sleep is dependant on many factors such as hormones, neurotransmitters, stress and available energy. It’s worth noting that the regenerative aspects of REM sleep and brain function have been shown to use as much glucose as when awake. Maintaining adequate available energy is key to getting sound-nights sleep.

Sleep apnoea: inability to enter REM sleep due to issues associated with optimal breathing. Obesity and sleep apnoea do seem to correlate and there is a suggestion of structural abnormalities in a small section of people.

The role of sleep in disease prevention

Sleep's role in psychiatric disorders, depression, metabolic disease and addiction are well documented. A key feature of a lack of sleep, besides on-going fatigue and failure to regenerate is the elevation of adrenalin and cortisol. Elevated levels of cortisol are well known to decrease thyroid function, which can have a significant effect on levels of circulating thyroid hormone and energy production (key to regulation of sleep). The mechanism can tie in with its pervasive actions on management of blood sugar levels. Another noted effect from sleep loss is that we tend to overeat more when tired, which could impact weight gain (and if thyroid is part of the vicious cycle, weight loss becomes increasingly difficult).

Lack of quality sleep can therefore be responsible for an increasing amount of deleterious conditions, such as hypothyroidism, diabetes and obesity, other hormone dys-regulation and cardiovascular disease. Ascertaining whether the issue initially stems from a hormone imbalance can be key in resolving sleep wake issues.

Drugs

There are a variety of drugs on the market that help to improve onset of sleep, however if you seek to improve the biological mechanisms of sleep and perhaps look to the list suggested below, you may find that your sleep improves, without the need for medication.

Cognitive behavioural therapy

The role of CBT in reducing Insomnia has shown effective results even more so than prescriptive medications. Whilst the treatment is not determined whether it effectively targets the mechanics of insomnia its success suggests provides a more desirable approach than long term insomnia medication.

What can you do?

  • Understand the link between production of inflammatory neurotransmitters such as Histamine and Serotonin and seek to lower them. This may be through diet adjustment or exposure to problematic chemicals/hormones.
  • If you get to sleep but wake up, this may be due to poor available energy. Maybe from a low carb diet, low thyroid function and poor production of energy. You may find having something light like a glass of milk with honey, or fruit juice with gelatin may help out. Salt also helps to decrease adrenalin production
  • Wi-Fi, blue light exposure, electromagnetic stress all play their part in interfering with stress and how the cells function. Stopping their use several hours before sleep can help. Do turn off Wi-Fi in house and no phones or electric devices by your bed.
  • Avoid stimulus such as caffeine or exercise in the evening, if you have sleep issues. Caffeine decreases production of adenosine.
  • If under emotional stress, a slow walk before bed may be a useful idea combined with ensuring adequate blood sugar levels are met.

References:

Neurobiology of Sleep. Course notes. Duke University. 2015.

Peat, R. From PMS to Menopause. Female Hormones in Context. 1997

Sapolsky R. Why Zebras don’t get Ulcers. St Martins Griffin. 1998

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2941414/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3443758/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27091535

 

Are you using nature to regenerate?

The more clients that I see, I realise that some are very in touch with their bodies and some have no idea what is going on with it. The same rationale can be applied to those who feel the immediate value of being immersed in nature and others who are blissfully unaware of the subject matter. I often remember the change that my body used to experience as I drove out of London towards the Yorkshire Dales; as I edged past the M25 into the countryside and the journey terminated in a swathe of greenery and granite rock, the stress meter had dialled down to a zero. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

So why is nature important to human body? The escalation of urbanised environments is ensuring that humans are packed into industrialised, colour lacking, banal developments, that do little to stimulate the eye and increased tension with hustle and close knit streets that people rush to and from work. This dense packing of people also accumulates a large amount of industrial pollutants, be it Benzene from car fuel, Wi-Fi (of which there is an increasing amount of literature to support it’s negative effects to hormone and cellular function) and many other factors that test the body to its limits.

There is increasing research that suggests that urbanisation is a prominent factor in rumination/negative thinking and decreasing mental health. To deal with managing aspects of mental health, exercise is often touted to be helpful as a distraction hypothesis and I don’t dispute the effectiveness of exercise training to help in this situation. A distraction is positive and exercising is essential for good health. However, how many people actually use, quiet appreciation in exercise to regenerate? We often so concerned with pushing ourselves in professional life that exercise often becomes wrapped up in the same goal setting schedules that people religiously stick to. Walking, boating, hiking and taking time to appreciate nature, take in the colours, slowly breathe in the less polluted air, listen to the birds sing, or simply sit on the beach and absorb the endless horizon of water. To often we don’t stop to take in these natural beauties as we are trying to beat those personal bests.

Studies are showing that walking for 90 minutes in a natural environment fares much better than walking in urban settings; The effects showing additional decreases in negative thinking and activity of the brain. I am a firm believer that running and cycling in built up areas may make you fitter but probably less healthier. Increased oxidation of pollutants in urbanised areas, contribute to health issues and mortality rates are on the rise. Training efficiently and smart would warrant that we should aim to exercise less in this manner. Walking in green spaces and utilising the stress decreasing mechanisms of nature, may have more impact to your health than running or cycling on by without appreciating the spaces surrounding you.

Life seems to be whizzing by faster than ever, isn’t it time we slowed down to appreciate it more? Train for strength, walk for health?

References: