metabolism

Why fruit juice won’t give you cancer.

But it can protect you against it.

But it can protect you against it.

You may have noticed the carbohydrate fearing headline stating that - "One small glass of juice a day raises cancer risk, " yesterday. Do you know when you’ve been tangoed?

This is based upon the study by Chazelas et al (Chazelas et al 2019) and being used to justify the swathe of dogmatic headlines in the press.Apart from the study being based on food questionnaires (mean food log was 5.6 days over 5 years hardly conclusive) which are not reliable indicators of actual consumption, the authors suggest that the mechanisms that might drive the association are as follows.

1.    Excessive sugar consumption could contribute to obesity driven mechanisms. There's no doubt that excess carbohydrate, fat and protein contribute to obesity when an EXCESS of calories are consumed (and the other multifactorial issues associated with obesity.

2.    Sugar from juice contributes to increased glycaemic load and inflammation. This point doesn't add up because many fruit juices have a low glycaemic load, associated with anti- inflammatory responses (polyphenols, vitamin c, capacity to lower endotoxins, improve blood sugar regulation and cholesterol levels). Many grains have higher glycaemic loads and index than juices. So is this really a valid argument?

Of the 101, 000 or so participants the increased risk associated with sugary drinks was found in those who exercised less. In an important factor, if you combine over consumption and decreased activity. Another point that the authors suggest on sugary drinks is that additives to sweetened beverages like sodas could also contribute to risk. Indeed a valid point.

It starts with a hint of truth and a headline or meme tends to become written in folklore, the myth of the carbohydrate rich food churning out death in its path. These small, half or even quarter truths often disappear when you scratch beneath the surface. That’s why I actively encourage carbohydrate and specifically carbohydrate consumption in my programs. Even most people I have met rarely chug down large amounts of fruit juices in isolation and even if glycemic index\load were an issue, when you consume carbohydrate rich foods with proteins and fats, these concepts are somewhat irrelevant.

Orange juice (or any juices) is one of those foods that still seems to be getting a bad rap but many people who demean its nature often fail to look at the studies that have shown it to be protective. You might have heard...but the sugar levels or but it’s acidic. Just take a look at the tabloid’s permanent vilification of the simple juice drink, which is based on half-truths of small increased risk with limited data. To play devil’s advocate, there’s no doubting that some people with less money available have been seduced into purchasing more junk food. It’s cheap, it’s filling and it’s full of sugar, vegetable oils, preservatives, GMOs, fillers, emulsifiers, additives like flavouring, enhancers, gums and much more. Yet still, the sugar is the demon in this list. Not even the pollution that’s shown to increase cancer, heart diseases, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, it’s still sugar and even if you drink fruit juice, it’s the sugar that will kill you.

So, with that in mind let’s consider what a simple food like orange juice could do to hasten, I’m sorry I meant prevent neurological and metabolic decline. Let’s first add some context. It should be no surprise that if you just drink large amounts of juice on their own, without balancing their ability to enter the blood stream with fats and or proteins, it isn’t going to be as beneficial. This is also why throwing large amounts of sweetened fizzy drinks down one’s neck can be problematic. The Glycemic index becomes redundant when you add another food into the mix, therefore drinking fruit juices with fats and proteins helps to normalise blood sugar responses in isolation. So why orange juice? Here are just a couple of reasons

Lowering inflammation

Eating a variety of foods has the capacity to increase inflammatory and damaging agents like endotoxin. Endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides is well known to increase in high fat and carbohydrate meals, especially so when fibrous poorly digested foods are consumed. High fat diets also induce endotoxin, and this is well known to induce intestinal hyperpermeability or the more well-known leaky gut syndrome. Consumption of orange juice appears to significantly reduce the levels and effects of inflammation induced by endotoxin (Ghanim et al., 2010) . Unfortunately, many foods are often kept stable longer with additives like carrageenan and gums, which also promote increased endotoxin.

Attenuates metabolic dysfunction

 “ Despite media concern, daily orange juice consumption did not result in adverse metabolic effects, despite providing additional dietary sugars. Data from epidemiological and in vitro studies suggest that orange juice (OJ) may have a positive impact on lipid metabolism. “ (Simpson, Mendis, & Macdonald, 2016)

During times of stress, under eating or consuming foods low in carbohydrates the response is to liberate energy from stored fats in the form of triglycerides. As metabolism becomes compromised high levels of triglycerides are known to be present in blood sugar dysregulation. There’s much in the press to suggest that sugar from fruit juice consumption increases cardiac risk but there are many studies that suggest otherwise, with the observed effect being reduced triglycerides and cholesterol (Aptekmann & Cesar, 2013). The cardiac protective factors aren’t limited to orange juice alone, pomegranate and other juices also seem to offer similar results (Moazzen & Alizadeh, 2017)

Decreased carcinogen production

A very relevant and protective mechanism of orange juice (and others) and fruit peel consumption is the decreased risk of gastrointestinal cancers (Xu, Song, & Reed, 1993). Nitrates and nitrates are naturally occurring compounds found in a variety of foods. Nitrates are often used in preservatives and sodium nitrites are ubiquitous in preserved meats and have a significant relationship between cancers in many of the mucosal areas including the mouth, bowel and lungs.. Nitrates have been implicated in not just intestinal and stomach cancers but increasingly thyroid cancers (Hernández- Ramírez et al., 2009). This occurs through increases in N-nitroso compounds (NOC) which increase the capacity of cell mutation but there are extensive studies that show many classes of NOC inhibitors which include vitamin e and vitamin C that negate that risk.

Of course, for optimal effects, ensuring adequate protein and fats are consumed will always be beneficial. We’ve known that compromised blood sugar and insulin responses are rarely to do with consuming carbohydrates. Unless excessive eating and obesity are the association, there’s plenty more relevant relationships such as environmental pollutants and other stressors that show a clear effect on all aspects of metabolism and increased metabolic disease. Yet many people seem intent on shooting the messenger and vilifying protective carbohydrates such as fruit juice.

 

References: 

 1.    Aptekmann, N. P., & Cesar, T. B. (2013). Long-term orange juice consumption is associated with low LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B in normal and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Lipids in Health and Disease. https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-12-119

2.   Chazelas Eloi, Srour Bernard, Desmetz Elisa, KesseGuyot Emmanuelle, Julia Chantal, Deschamps Valérie et al. Sugary drink consumption and risk of cancer: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort BMJ2019; 366 :l2408

3.    Ghanim, H., Sia, C. L., Upadhyay, M., Korzeniewski, K., Viswanathan, P., Abuaysheh, S., … Dandona, P. (2010). Orange juice neutralizes the proinflammatory effect of a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal and prevents endotoxin increase and toll-like receptor expression. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28584

4.    Hernández-Ramírez, R. U., Galván-Portillo, M. V., Ward, M. H., Agudo, A., González, C. A., Oñate-Ocaña, L. F., … López-Carrillo, L. (2009). Dietary intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite and gastric cancer risk in Mexico City. International Journal of Cancer. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24454

5.    Moazzen, H., & Alizadeh, M. (2017). Effects of Pomegranate Juice on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: a Double-Blinded, Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11130-017-0605-6

6.    Simpson, E. J., Mendis, B., & Macdonald, I. A. (2016). Orange juice consumption and its effect on blood lipid profile and indices of the metabolic syndrome; A randomised, controlled trial in an at-risk population. Food and Function. https://doi.org/10.1039/c6fo00039h

7.    Xu, G. P., Song, P. J., & Reed, P. I. (1993). Effects of fruit juices, processed vegetable juice, orange peel and green tea on endogenous formation of N-nitrosoproline in subjects from a high-risk area for gastric cancer in Moping County, China. European Journal of Cancer Prevention. https://doi.org/10.1097/00008469-199307000-00007

 

 

Being holistic versus (holistic) critical thinking.

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Is being 'holistic' an advantage to holistic critical thinking? It’s relatively easy to get drawn into a naturalistic fallacy of consuming all foods in their most raw natural state. Perhaps you’re someone who went from a fast food diet, where you didn’t feel your best, to consuming more whole foods, fresh fruit and vegetables? It’s easy to see how a switch and positive changes can occur in the short term. The next step is to start preaching to the masses how sugar is bad, how your life will be saved with green smoothies, nuts, seeds and coffee butt cleanses. For the record this is a waste of coffee and not to far from what I was preaching a decade ago. So what does it mean to be holistic?There’s a large movement within the health fitness and wellness industry (and lay people) that are drawn to  'holistic' thinking, and their definition is often enforced by the fallacy that everything in its most natural state is better for human health. This appears to include foods like nut milks (yes you can milk a nut), kale smoothies, seed oils like flax and undercooked broccoli and other greens, despite their negative effects on human health when consumed in substantial amounts. It’s a religion, and much like religion and with this mind-set it isn’t going to make you any healthier. I’ll make reference here to the late, great Beastie Boy, MCA who despite being a vegan and a Buddhist died far too early from throat cancer.

It is true that eating plenty of foods in their most natural state f(or some foods) can be important for health. But the image on the right highlights the faulty narrative of being holistic without thinking about the consequences. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meats and the like require minimal processing but in the quest for longevity, taste and profit, adding preservatives and flavour enhancers causes our food sources to become problematic. The so called ‘holistic’ folk get lost in this narrative urging your diet to become abundant in the rawest, greenest and brownest foods, that are most indigestible and contain potent inhibitors of biological function.

To integrate a level of holism into nutrition and function requires a level of critical thinking. What do these foods contain? How do they affect physiology? It’s well known that the brassica vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower and sprouts contain potent compounds that decrease energy output. These goitregens inhibit thyroid output and isothiocyanates found in cruciferous vegetables affects TPO or thyroid peroxidase, both of which are exacerbated when iodine uptake or restriction is present. Research tends to support these problematic effects (Choi & Kim, 2014)(Truong, Baron-Dubourdieu, Rougier, & Guénel, 2010), but much attention is focused on the smaller compounds that seem to work well in test tubes, rather than its global effects. As the environment becomes more stressful for biology do we need more building or reducing factors within our control?

The environment can be a harsh place. There are plenty of pollutants that have a negative effect on fertility, metabolism and other key endocrine aspects of health, some of which are industrial, others purposively added to food (arguably another form of industry) (Rajpert-De Meyts, Skakkebaek, & Toppari, 2000)(Upson, Harmon, & Baird, 2016). We can argue that the environment has always been a harsh place and adaptation has taken place as a response to selective pressures at the heart of evolution. Yet currently we are heading towards a tipping point, as environmental stimulants appear to be at the heart of acquired biological damage that is inherited by offspring. Cancer, fertility and other metabolic diseases are more common than ever and yet the approach is to keep seeking the magic bullet to ameliorate the fate that awaits many of us.

If we were to ask:

What enhances biological function, makes us more robust and allows us to have a stronger conversation with a stressful environment?

Rather than succumb to its stressors.

The highway to health

The highway to health

A biological system in its best working order could be represented, as an infinite road stretching into the  distance, perhaps with the odd bump along the way or a slight deviation but an ability to get back on track is available. Compare that to the inhibitory T-junction where the body cannot function as the clear straight road, it deviates from its true organised direction. The journey is laboured and restrictive. The ability to flux and respond to stressors is key and adequate energy is an essential component of reorganisation.

Nutrition is an important factor for such conversations with the environment. Eating a diet that is dominated with foods that are difficult to digest, decrease energy availability and create more stress are not going to make chatting any easier. If we make the effort to understand what keeps a cell and its mitochondria functioning at its most efficient state, we can understand why aspects such as sugar, adequate protein, moderate exercise, light and other factors, can play a role in overcoming current stimulus that decrease function and increase disease states.

The following article is definitely worth a read for an understanding of the concepts that I have talked about. http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/vegetables.shtm

References:

Choi, W. J., & Kim, J. (2014). Dietary factors and the risk of thyroid cancer: a review. Clinical Nutrition Research, 3(2), 75–88. http://doi.org/10.7762/cnr.2014.3.2.75

Rajpert-De Meyts, E., Skakkebaek, N. E., & Toppari, J. (2000). Testicular Cancer Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Endocrine Aspects. Endotext. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25905224

Truong, T., Baron-Dubourdieu, D., Rougier, Y., & Guénel, P. (2010). Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide case-control study in New Caledonia. Cancer Causes and Control, 21(8), 1183–1192. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9545-2

Upson, K., Harmon, Q. E., & Baird, D. D. (2016). Soy-based infant formula feeding and ultrasound-detected uterine fibroids among young African-American women with no prior clinical diagnosis of fibroids. Environmental Health Perspectives, 124(6), 769–775. http://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510082

Methylene Blue - Let’s play the blues.

Methylene blue - an overview: There’s been many times when I have recommended compounds/agents to create change in clients. Even the basic strategies of increasing sugar, not wearing sunscreen or the use of aspirin for improving energy and decreasing oxidative stress has moved the odd eyebrow to be raised. Objections often dissipate when presented with the line of reasoning and research that supports my recommendations. Effective clients will often do their own research and come back armed with significant questions for a better understanding of what is trying to be achieved. Research previously conducted by the Nobel scientist Albert Szent Györgi showed that previously damaged cells that produce energy inefficiently can be restored with methylene blue.

MB.jpg

Restoring respiration with colour.

So with the tradition of raising more eyebrows let’s suggest the use of a blue dye that can be added to aquariums for improving marine life health. That’s right you put it in fish tanks. Why indeed would you not think of consuming glassfuls of the stuff?

Methylene blue (MB) is a dye that has shown promising results in the following areas:

  • Tissue hypoxia

  • Hyper dynamic circulation of the liver post cirrhosis

  • Improved low blood pressure states

  • Hepato-pulmonary syndrome

  • Anti malarial agent

  • Improves mitochondrial function

  • Detects parasites such as h-Pylori

  • With additional treatment of red light has anti-parasitic effects.

  • Anti-microbial-kills MRSA

  • Hepatitis C and other conditions also effectively treated in tandem with red light application.

  • Anti-Alzheimer’s agent- attenuates amyloid plaques and improves mitochondrial function.

MB is able to decrease both nitric oxide and guanylate cyclase, both exert their influence on smooth cells and tissue, explaining its role in reversing severely low blood pressure states ( Medically termed - catecholamine refractory vasoplegia)

If we look closely at a couple of the major mechanisms, we can see that from a metabolic standpoint MB has some interesting benefits. It decreases hypoxia or increases oxygen saturation within the body, whilst also improving mitochondrial energy production.

The respiratory/ electron transfer (ETC) chain, that is essentially the mechanism providing optimal use of oxygen, carbohydrate, fat, when this functions well, carbon dioxide is produced, which allows for optimal dissociation of oxygen from haemoglobin. When the respiratory chain is damaged, cells often have to switch to inefficient anaerobic sources of energy production, wasting sugar and increasing lactic acid, which continue to decrease aspects of cellular function.

Methemoglobinemia is a state where haemoglobin is unable to carry oxygen. MB reacts within the red blood cell and converts ferric ions, which have been oxidised, to its former oxygen carrying state. Additionally it helps to repair the ETC that is often damaged due to pollutant, poison or inefficient metabolic induced changes as seen in states of Alzheimer’s (Oz, Lorke, & Petroianu, 2009).

Another novel aspect of MB is the treatment of parasitic infection. MB absorbs and reacts with the spectrum of red light acting as an antimicrobial/parasitic agent.

“ Protozoa require the invasion of a suitable host to complete all or part of their life cycle.”

So what constitutes an appropriate host? I offer the following definition.

An individual or organism that is unable to assimilate and produce energy effectively, organise optimal cellular function and provide an immune response capable of expelling or eradicating an opportunistic parasitic/bacterial infection.

I quote Ray Peat with the following:

“ Occasionally you have very vigorous parasites that have intentions. If they encounter you in a state when your blood sugar is low, for example, the parasites might find an opportunity and start disorganising your system. So the competing systems’ lower system getting a foothold in a higher system, counts as randomness. The assumption of randomness is usually that everything is always random. What has been ordered is achieved at a high cost, the arrow of time for these people is that you have to expend energy to create order, and get things piled up in a certain way can only do that by expending energy somewhere else. "

MB and the use low level laser therapy (or LLLT which uses red or near infra red light) have a commonality with their ability to reduce the inhibitory actions of nitric oxide. This leads to enhanced cytochrome c oxidase action at complex IV of the ETC ( in English this means the enzyme that promotes better function of the cells that use oxygen efficiently), promoting increased cellular respiration and energy production (ATP). These dual actions appear to be an effective anti-parasitic treatment.

If your still running around taking a rucksack full of supplements, restricting energy and immune enhancing foods to kill parasites and candida, this may be a far more effective therapy to consider. It should be no surprise that that considering these actions, the use of MB is being investigated as a serious therapy in the fight against cancer. The biology of cancer can be attributed to metabolic defects/damage within the mitochondria leading to mutations.

Of course like any compound whether it be oxygen, water, broccoli or vodka certain doses are problematic. However these are generally high. For example doses used to treat malaria are suggested as 36-72mg/kg over 3 days (Meissner et al., 2006) and safe therapeutic doses are suggested as <2mg/kg (Ginimuge & Jyothi, 2010). Newborn babies seem susceptible to MB side effects such as skin discoloration, respiratory distress and other unwanted symptoms. However, the mechanisms of why this might happen, requires a blog alone. It also appears problematic to those taking SSRI’s and can increase serotonin uptake to toxic levels.

What I have learnt from taking MB.

I found that if I took doses of more than 5mg total within a day or two of each other, my urine turned blue. A self -limiting factor that probably suggests that I was taking too much. I also had the odd crazy dream. I generally found that a total intake of 2.5 mgs or around 5 drops 2-3 days per week seemed to serve me well. I titrated up and found the optimal dose, something which I strongly recommend doing for all.

I found that my pulse oximeter readings improved from a general SpO2 93-97 to regular 98. Which is interesting as one side effect previously suggested is the ability of MB to underestimate pulse ox readings. It’s prudent to imply that any therapeutic dose may only create change as the system allows. Therefore basics strategies such as effective blood sugar regulation, through regular eating and other strategies should be applied.

Ps it’s also great at reversing cyanide and nitrate poisoning in fish. Might it be useful in humans consuming too much bacon?

1. Ginimuge, P. R., & Jyothi, S. D. (2010). Methylene blue: revisited. Journal of Anaesthesiology, Clinical Pharmacology, 26(4), 517–20.

2. Meissner, P. E., Mandi, G., Coulibaly, B., Witte, S., Tapsoba, T., Mansmann, U., … Müller, O. (2006). Methylene blue for malaria in Africa: Results from a dose-finding study in combination with chloroquine. Malaria Journal, 5. http://doi.org/10.1186/1475-2875-5-84

3. Oz, M., Lorke, D. E., & Petroianu, G. A. (2009). Methylene blue and Alzheimer’s disease. Biochemical Pharmacology, 78(8), 927–932. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.bcp.2009.04.034

4. Ray Peat quote originally taken from a YouTube interview with Andrew Murray. (cant recall which one)

5. https://www.google.com/patents/WO2007038201A1?cl=en 6. http://valtsus.blogspot.ae/ contains over 2500 LLLT studies and is by far the best resource available on the actions of LLLT.

Adrenal fatigue or reductionist thinking? Part 2: Restoration of metabolic processes

adrenal Restoration of metabolic process- lowering the adrenal load.

Sugar, fat and other mal-aligned  factors.

Saturated fat is bad for you, so they said but it clearly wasn’t. Now it’s sugars turn. Sugar causes diabetes, cancer and many other modern conditions, if you are to believe many of the memes on social media. Well no, it doesn’t. Cancer for example is usually created from a specific defect to the respiratory apparatus of the cell. In English that means part of the cell that utilises oxygen. Sugar or Sucrose whose primary constituents are both Fructose and Glucose are readily available carbohydrates and the brain/central nervous system require plenty. Have you ever noticed that brain fog creep in when on that low carb diet? The reason? Restricted carbohydrates  equals reduced cognitive process’s. Yes we can generate glucose via oxidation of fat, in the form of ketosis and you can also break down protein to generate glucose too, but these methods are less than efficient forms of energy generation and long-term utilisation of these systems is not ideal.

Sugar produces energy and when processed with oxygen is much more efficient than glycolysis or energy production without oxygen (anaerobic). In those who have damaged metabolism, there is a reliance on the production of energy in this manner, lactic acid is often produced even at rest. Therefore trying to exercise at intense levels poses a problem for those with both adrenal and metabolic issues.

Give the body what it needs?  Got cravings? You know those ones where you are dying for some food, starchy carbohydrates, a sugary drink? There are no demons at work here, just a simple case of biology, carbohydrates are a primary fuel source for the body. Want to avoid coming crashing down? Avoid having 3 big meals a day and maintain blood sugar levels by eating frequently. Some do better than others but allowing 4-6 meals a day and noting how you feel is a step in the right direction. Maintaining a body temperature of 37 degrees and a pulse rate of 70-85 beats per minute is ideal. This has been well documented in the work of thyroid researcher Broda Barnes and the work of Ray Peat PhD.

Eating readily available carbohydrates such as ripe digestible fruits, protein and saturated fats (in the right amounts) such as coconut oil help to maintain blood sugar levels throughout the day without the resultant elevations in cortisol, which affect adrenal regulation issues.

Stressful situations often warrant the use of supplements such as Vitamins A, B6, C, magnesium and potassium. In particular sugary foods, which should include fruit, maple syrup and honey are ideal choices to diminish the stress response (even table sugar could play a therapeutic role in lowering stress).

Salt is also a powerful anti-stress compound. During stress sodium is often passed more rapidly from the body. Sodium spares magnesium. If you drink too much water the level of sodium excretion increases, which further decreases available magnesium. The research on lowering salt intake is inconclusive but what is known, is that when a low sodium state exists, aldosterone, a hormone that is used to regulate both salt and blood pressure elevates in response. It would come as no surprise that in a low adrenal state, feeling dizzy when moving from seated to standing exits due to poor blood pressure regulation. Craving salt is a mechanism to improve such a situation.

The current mind set regarding exercise and wellbeing is

Increased exercise + Low carb and raw foods = Health

And in the short term, markers suggest that this could be favourable. So how do you tell if this working for you long term? The monitoring of both pulse and body temperature give a great insight into optimal biological function. Here are some of the symptoms, which combine both compromised cortisol and thyroid function.

  • Cold hands, feet and nose
  • Energy crashes
  • Poor wound healing
  • Poor sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Constipation or alternation between constipation and diarrheoa
  • Weight gain
  • Bloating
  • Skin issues
  • Low libido

In reality:

Intense exercise + low carb/raw food diets= compromised metabolism.

Historically in many, changing both the way you eat and completing more exercise may have worked previously, but as you push the markers of exercising more and eating less or certainly eating foods that do not support your activities. You may see many of those symptoms above start to creep into your daily life. There’s no doubt that eating well and exercising are productive pursuits for optimal body function. However for many the lines are blurred as to what actually is a healthy diet.  Consumption of large amounts of grains, margarine and low fat foods were being touted as healthy a decade or two earlier, now look at the research condemning that approach. The following information seems to be heading a similar route.

For the health conscious exerciser today a diet high in raw green vegetables, green juices, seeds nuts, fish oils, low carb, low starch seems to be the zeitgeist but is it that healthy? From a biological perspective the answer would be no. Eating these foods over a long period of time not only increases the stress response but may actually damage how our body’s cells actually function. Increasing available energy from easily digestible foods helps to assimilate energy for production. In contrast foods such as many raw green vegetables, nuts, seeds and vegetable oils, not only irritate the bowel, sit and accumulate bacteria damaging the intestinal lining, but also provide less than optimal nutrition, which will lower metabolic rate.

Moving is important, no doubt, but exercising to within an inch of total fatigue can be detrimental, especially so when dealing with issues related to both adrenal and metabolic based issues. Finding the right type of exercise and even stepping back and focusing on exercise that doesn’t produce high levels of lactic acid, causes hyperventilation and the loss of carbon dioxide should be considered in the short term. The goal of improving metabolic function, restoring deep sleep and raising energy should always predominate over the loss of body fat reduction. It’s a tricky issue to get your head around for some, but when you start to feel great again. You’ll understand why.