nutrition

Why fruit juice won’t give you cancer.

But it can protect you against it.

But it can protect you against it.

You may have noticed the carbohydrate fearing headline stating that - "One small glass of juice a day raises cancer risk, " yesterday. Do you know when you’ve been tangoed?

This is based upon the study by Chazelas et al (Chazelas et al 2019) and being used to justify the swathe of dogmatic headlines in the press.Apart from the study being based on food questionnaires (mean food log was 5.6 days over 5 years hardly conclusive) which are not reliable indicators of actual consumption, the authors suggest that the mechanisms that might drive the association are as follows.

1.    Excessive sugar consumption could contribute to obesity driven mechanisms. There's no doubt that excess carbohydrate, fat and protein contribute to obesity when an EXCESS of calories are consumed (and the other multifactorial issues associated with obesity.

2.    Sugar from juice contributes to increased glycaemic load and inflammation. This point doesn't add up because many fruit juices have a low glycaemic load, associated with anti- inflammatory responses (polyphenols, vitamin c, capacity to lower endotoxins, improve blood sugar regulation and cholesterol levels). Many grains have higher glycaemic loads and index than juices. So is this really a valid argument?

Of the 101, 000 or so participants the increased risk associated with sugary drinks was found in those who exercised less. In an important factor, if you combine over consumption and decreased activity. Another point that the authors suggest on sugary drinks is that additives to sweetened beverages like sodas could also contribute to risk. Indeed a valid point.

It starts with a hint of truth and a headline or meme tends to become written in folklore, the myth of the carbohydrate rich food churning out death in its path. These small, half or even quarter truths often disappear when you scratch beneath the surface. That’s why I actively encourage carbohydrate and specifically carbohydrate consumption in my programs. Even most people I have met rarely chug down large amounts of fruit juices in isolation and even if glycemic index\load were an issue, when you consume carbohydrate rich foods with proteins and fats, these concepts are somewhat irrelevant.

Orange juice (or any juices) is one of those foods that still seems to be getting a bad rap but many people who demean its nature often fail to look at the studies that have shown it to be protective. You might have heard...but the sugar levels or but it’s acidic. Just take a look at the tabloid’s permanent vilification of the simple juice drink, which is based on half-truths of small increased risk with limited data. To play devil’s advocate, there’s no doubting that some people with less money available have been seduced into purchasing more junk food. It’s cheap, it’s filling and it’s full of sugar, vegetable oils, preservatives, GMOs, fillers, emulsifiers, additives like flavouring, enhancers, gums and much more. Yet still, the sugar is the demon in this list. Not even the pollution that’s shown to increase cancer, heart diseases, diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, it’s still sugar and even if you drink fruit juice, it’s the sugar that will kill you.

So, with that in mind let’s consider what a simple food like orange juice could do to hasten, I’m sorry I meant prevent neurological and metabolic decline. Let’s first add some context. It should be no surprise that if you just drink large amounts of juice on their own, without balancing their ability to enter the blood stream with fats and or proteins, it isn’t going to be as beneficial. This is also why throwing large amounts of sweetened fizzy drinks down one’s neck can be problematic. The Glycemic index becomes redundant when you add another food into the mix, therefore drinking fruit juices with fats and proteins helps to normalise blood sugar responses in isolation. So why orange juice? Here are just a couple of reasons

Lowering inflammation

Eating a variety of foods has the capacity to increase inflammatory and damaging agents like endotoxin. Endotoxin or lipopolysaccharides is well known to increase in high fat and carbohydrate meals, especially so when fibrous poorly digested foods are consumed. High fat diets also induce endotoxin, and this is well known to induce intestinal hyperpermeability or the more well-known leaky gut syndrome. Consumption of orange juice appears to significantly reduce the levels and effects of inflammation induced by endotoxin (Ghanim et al., 2010) . Unfortunately, many foods are often kept stable longer with additives like carrageenan and gums, which also promote increased endotoxin.

Attenuates metabolic dysfunction

 “ Despite media concern, daily orange juice consumption did not result in adverse metabolic effects, despite providing additional dietary sugars. Data from epidemiological and in vitro studies suggest that orange juice (OJ) may have a positive impact on lipid metabolism. “ (Simpson, Mendis, & Macdonald, 2016)

During times of stress, under eating or consuming foods low in carbohydrates the response is to liberate energy from stored fats in the form of triglycerides. As metabolism becomes compromised high levels of triglycerides are known to be present in blood sugar dysregulation. There’s much in the press to suggest that sugar from fruit juice consumption increases cardiac risk but there are many studies that suggest otherwise, with the observed effect being reduced triglycerides and cholesterol (Aptekmann & Cesar, 2013). The cardiac protective factors aren’t limited to orange juice alone, pomegranate and other juices also seem to offer similar results (Moazzen & Alizadeh, 2017)

Decreased carcinogen production

A very relevant and protective mechanism of orange juice (and others) and fruit peel consumption is the decreased risk of gastrointestinal cancers (Xu, Song, & Reed, 1993). Nitrates and nitrates are naturally occurring compounds found in a variety of foods. Nitrates are often used in preservatives and sodium nitrites are ubiquitous in preserved meats and have a significant relationship between cancers in many of the mucosal areas including the mouth, bowel and lungs.. Nitrates have been implicated in not just intestinal and stomach cancers but increasingly thyroid cancers (Hernández- Ramírez et al., 2009). This occurs through increases in N-nitroso compounds (NOC) which increase the capacity of cell mutation but there are extensive studies that show many classes of NOC inhibitors which include vitamin e and vitamin C that negate that risk.

Of course, for optimal effects, ensuring adequate protein and fats are consumed will always be beneficial. We’ve known that compromised blood sugar and insulin responses are rarely to do with consuming carbohydrates. Unless excessive eating and obesity are the association, there’s plenty more relevant relationships such as environmental pollutants and other stressors that show a clear effect on all aspects of metabolism and increased metabolic disease. Yet many people seem intent on shooting the messenger and vilifying protective carbohydrates such as fruit juice.

 

References: 

 1.    Aptekmann, N. P., & Cesar, T. B. (2013). Long-term orange juice consumption is associated with low LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B in normal and moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. Lipids in Health and Disease. https://doi.org/10.1186/1476-511X-12-119

2.   Chazelas Eloi, Srour Bernard, Desmetz Elisa, KesseGuyot Emmanuelle, Julia Chantal, Deschamps Valérie et al. Sugary drink consumption and risk of cancer: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort BMJ2019; 366 :l2408

3.    Ghanim, H., Sia, C. L., Upadhyay, M., Korzeniewski, K., Viswanathan, P., Abuaysheh, S., … Dandona, P. (2010). Orange juice neutralizes the proinflammatory effect of a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal and prevents endotoxin increase and toll-like receptor expression. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.2009.28584

4.    Hernández-Ramírez, R. U., Galván-Portillo, M. V., Ward, M. H., Agudo, A., González, C. A., Oñate-Ocaña, L. F., … López-Carrillo, L. (2009). Dietary intake of polyphenols, nitrate and nitrite and gastric cancer risk in Mexico City. International Journal of Cancer. https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24454

5.    Moazzen, H., & Alizadeh, M. (2017). Effects of Pomegranate Juice on Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: a Double-Blinded, Randomized Crossover Controlled Trial. Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11130-017-0605-6

6.    Simpson, E. J., Mendis, B., & Macdonald, I. A. (2016). Orange juice consumption and its effect on blood lipid profile and indices of the metabolic syndrome; A randomised, controlled trial in an at-risk population. Food and Function. https://doi.org/10.1039/c6fo00039h

7.    Xu, G. P., Song, P. J., & Reed, P. I. (1993). Effects of fruit juices, processed vegetable juice, orange peel and green tea on endogenous formation of N-nitrosoproline in subjects from a high-risk area for gastric cancer in Moping County, China. European Journal of Cancer Prevention. https://doi.org/10.1097/00008469-199307000-00007

 

 

The Big Estrogen Hoax

Routine spraying with potent pesticides was deemed safe previously.

Routine spraying with potent pesticides was deemed safe previously.

One of the reasons I decided to pursue a master’s degree in endocrinology was to challenge my own bias and what I had learnt from reading the works of people like Ray Peat PhD and Dr Katherina Dalton. Prior to my thesis I had to undertake a post graduate diploma due to my lack of medical training. It became apparent early on that discussions were heavily centred around endocrine mechanisms that occur in isolation that have become almost indoctrinated throughout text books and the plethora of funded research to support these narratives. My own research investigated the dogmatic belief that thyroid blood tests are accurate when faced with ongoing stress, nutrition and pollution issues that can render such blood tests inaccurate and more often than not appear normal. I thought having better conversations with clinicians might be a positive outcome of this study but anytime I attempt to discuss its always the same deflection that blood tests are accurate. It’s clear they are not in many different scenarios

One of the biggest problems and what could indeed be deemed as the biggest hoax in medicine (although the perpetuation of the need to lower cholesterol levels with statins is on a par with that) is the dogmatic belief that a female becomes estrogen deficient during the menopause. After reading Ray Peat’s PhD thesis and book (Peat, 1997)(Peat, 1972) that stated the counter argument, I’ve tried to look at this argument extensively over the last few years. It seems complex on the outside but consider the following and think about if for a minute or two.

Why is pregnancy protective?

When a woman becomes pregnant, she can produce up to 100 x more progesterone than normal. Why? It’s well known that progesterone is a hormone of organisation. It’s been shown to be associated with differentiation (regulate tissue growth induced by estrogen) compared to estrogen’s action of tissue growth, therefore just like thyroid hormone it’s a potent factor in creating tissue oxygenation and enhances blood sugar regulation. It’s well known that many miscarriages occur in the first trimester due to hypoxia induced by increased estrogen levels. Excess estrogen is also associated with disorganised biology and cancer. We know progesterone is protective and organisational so why does the madness persist that ovarian decline is associated with a lack of estrogen?

Recently I’ve thought about the comparison between economics and environment and how analogous it is with an excess of estrogen. The world needs more progesterone, it’s exposure to estrogen like processes of growth, unrestricted profits and resource draining that is excessive and unrestrained. It needs less leadership, more organisation, more differentiation and more cooperation. So do cells when they are exposed to the same forces.

The biggest study to date assessing the effects of hormone replacement therapy or HRT was the women’s health initiative (Rossouw et al., 2002). The main findings of this study were that HRT increased breast cancer and cardiovascular risk by increasing thrombosis. Further problems were encountered when progestins were added to estrogen replacement therapy.

Now go back and read that last part again because this is where a vast problem exists in medicine and advice given to females. Not just going through menopause but equally any advice they are generally given related to hormone health, effects of contraception etc. Why? Because progestins are not progesterone, they are synthetic versions of progesterone that act very differently to natural progesterone and the real problem is the acceptance by medical practitioners that they are one in the same.

Why so much confusion?

Take the following paper Progesterone action in endometrial cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer by Kim et al (Kim, Kurita, & Bulun, 2013). This is a well-respected group of progesterone researchers who do make the distinction that progesterone antagonizes estrogen driven growth in the endometrium and that insufficient progesterone increases endometrial cancer. Throughout the paper they often cite the negative effects of supplemental progesterone (particularly with breast cancer) combined with estrogens that increase the progesterone receptor (PR) and increase cancer growth. Yet all the studies cited have used progestins and not natural progesterone. This is a primary factor in the perpetuation of mass confusion between progestins and natural progesterone.

Not that the receptor is a great way to test a hormones actions and in particular the PR can be stimulated by estrogen, other hormones such as cortisol and like other receptors can be hijacked and regulated by a variety of pollutants that mimic estrogen. Ray Peat points out that receptors have been proposed for everything in biology to bring order to complexity and an attempt to limit biology to lock and key mechanisms. Receptors do exist but they don’t explain all the processes that occur.

Progesterone is protective across many aspects of function

There are many studies on progesterone and its broad actions on fertility, blood sugar, sleep, mood and more. Katherina Dalton who produced over one hundred and fifty publications on the role of progesterone and showed that issues such as post-natal depression and morning sickness often resolved with additional progesterone  Dr Dalton even helped individuals in court whose aggressive actions were mediated by progesterone deficiency (Dalton, 1980). Many people often state that we’ve moved on from old medicine but in reality we have moved away from medicine that doesn’t make vast profits for companies. It wouldn’t be unscrupulous to suggest that the blurred lines have been purposeful to confuse both clinicians and the public alike. Don’t just take my word for it, there’s plenty of data to review . In a systematic review of thirteen studies of progesterone by Spark and Willis (Spark & Willis, 2012) they state:

 

‘ Even though the words progestogen and progesterone are not interchangeable they are often used interchangeably which results in confusion about therapeutic use of progesterone.’

‘ Even though the words progestogen and progesterone are not interchangeable they are often used interchangeably which results in confusion about therapeutic use of progesterone.’

Expanding that large randomised control studies in progesterone have not been undertaken and this might primarily be due to poor profit margins from a natural versus  synthetic compounds. It’s hard not to sound a like a conspiracy theorist but there really is no vast sums of money for large corporations when progesterone is used. Given that it also drastically reduces the need for blood pressure, blood sugar, infertility and menopausal medications it starts to make some sense.

Some old books on progesterone, post natal depression and PMS by Katherina Dalton are worth a read. I picked all mine up for a quid or two a few years back but you can still get them.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Depression-after-Childbirth-Recognise-2001-05-31/dp/B01JXORBK0/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=katherina+dalton&qid=1560326142&s=gateway&sr=8-1

Ray Peats website has dozens of excellent articles too http://raypeat.com/

 References: 

Dalton, K. (1980). CYCLICAL CRIMINAL ACTS IN PREMENSTRUAL SYNDROME. The Lancet. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(80)92286-2

Kim, J. J., Kurita, T., & Bulun, S. E. (2013). Progesterone action in endometrial cancer, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, and breast cancer. Endocrine Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1210/er.2012-1043

Peat, R. (1972). Age Related Oxidative Changes in the Hamster Uterus. University of Oregon.

Peat, R. (1997). From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in context.

Rossouw, J. E., Anderson, G. L., Prentice, R. L., LaCroix, A. Z., Kooperberg, C., Stefanick, M. L., … Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative Investigators. (2002). Risks and benefits of estrogen plus progestin in healthy postmenopausal women: principal results From the Women’s Health Initiative randomized controlled trial. JAMA.

Spark, M. J., & Willis, J. (2012). Systematic review of progesterone use by midlife and menopausal women. Maturitas. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.maturitas.2012.03.015

 

 

 

Chronic stress, appetite suppression, control and metabolic inflexibility.

It was the famous stress scientist Hans Selye who suggested that stress can be a positive or negative force. But how do we know whether we are dealing with stress effectively? There’s a common theme among clients both male and female who have got used to feeling in control of their health by suppressing appetite, symptoms and a false sense of health by perhaps feeling in control. Is this control a false economy? A well-known symptom of stress is a loss of appetite and skipping breakfast, it feels better to perpetuate the production of stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol to liberate energy from stored fats and stride through the day with their endorphin like qualities. A common theme of females suffering from poly cystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is chronic irregular eating or over eating in the obese. High stress can be chronic and perceived as the norm. I’ve observed the former in my eldest daughter through under eating as a product of emotional stress

‘For those habituated to high levels of internal stress since early childhood, it is the absence of stress that creates unease, evoking boredom and a sense of meaningless. People may have become addicted to their own stress hormones, adrenaline and cortisol, Hans Selye observed. To such person’s stress feels desirable, while the absence of it feels like something to be avoided.’ Gabor Mate

It should come as no surprise why some studies suggest that short term fasting, and calorific restriction seem to be productive in reversing aspects of inflammation and auto immune disease. When the body is stressed even eating certain foods becomes stressful. Dairy, sugar, fruits, grains all get the blame. I feel better when I don’t eat these some say. I feel better when I don’t eat others say. Is it the food or is it you? Can you be so fragile that eating some fruit for example is enough to send your biology into a tail spin. Eating sugar in excess can be problematic but then so can eating fat or anything in excess.

Copy of Copy of Copy of Untitled.jpg

A foundation of good health is built upon biological flexibility, potential and far away from equilibrium states.

The inability to utilise carbohydrate is a snapshot of the inflexibility of an individuals’ metabolism and not the carbohydrate. Evolutionary biology has provided efficiency by aerobic metabolism of carbohydrate and fat. The loss of efficient use of carbohydrate/sugar is the hallmark of a loss of function or flexibility and the chronic use of fats as a fuel is problematic due to increased oxidation of these lipids which can damage the aerobic apparatus within the mitochondria. The Randle cycle or glucose fatty acid cycle should allow flexibility between using either fats or carbohydrate as a fuel (Randle, Garland, Hales, & Newsholme, 1963). It’s often the lack of flexibility, decreased oxidation of carbohydrate and perpetual use of fats that damage the energy producing cells. Saturated fats are the preferred fuel of aerobic (oxidative) metabolism but in aggressive metabolism of cancer cells, unsaturated fats are utilised perpetuating the damage, promoting inefficient glycolysis or anaerobic metabolism that creates the acidic state of the cell.

The dogma that persists in nutrition circles is not based on sound reasoning but limited ideas that look at short term studies related to carbohydrate restriction. When a system loses its capacity to regulate sugar, we blame sugar instead of looking at the variety of factors that are responsible for degraded biology, carbohydrate utilisation and insulin responses.

Whether excessive exercise or inadequate nutrition the end result may be similar and its effects are far reaching into metabolism, cardiovascular, sexual and reproductive physiology.

By improving life conditions (in many ways) the hormones of pleasure can have a bigger role in our physiology. I think the experience of pleasure (whatever capacity for pleasure there is) increases the ability to experience pleasure, but I don't offer this with much hope as a therapeutic approach, since I know of people who say that running to exhaustion makes them "feel good" - neither "feeling good" nor "having orgasms" has a clear meaning, at present. Ray Peat

I’m not suggesting that going long periods without eating are necessarily bad, nor if you enjoy running is that bad either. Context is key. If you enjoy running run. If you have the capacity to go long hours without eating, then do that too. However if you have a system that lacks flexibility these actions can be problematic.

Have you ever considered not engaging in intense exercise for a couple of weeks to see how your body really feels?

I think this is a useful test to discover where your biology is really at. It can help determine whether you have been propping up a dysfunctional biology with intense exercise that falsely elevates your body temperature through activation of the sympathetic stress pathway. Slowing down and just focusing on walking and a few stretches shouldn’t feel stressful. Equally an individual who switches to eating regularly every 3 hours or so with the same amount of calories they were previously eating shouldn’t feel stressful. We all have patterns, routines and to the extent that they are effective or not is dictated by the metabolic flexibility that one should have. I’ll also suggest that metabolic flexibility could be analogous to emotional flexibility and mood states. A sign of improvements to metabolic flexibility and flux is return of energy, ability to tolerate exercise, good sleep, libido and emotional responses among other aspects of function. How do you know if it’s working? This diagram suggests what drivers are necessary and how to overcome your unwanted symptoms with the right inputs.

Metabolic inflexibilitY.jpg

Some patience seeking the return of these aspects of function is needed. After all, if you have spent decades constrained by negative symptoms then it may take more than a few weeks or months to fully resolve these patterns. In addition to the foundational work on hormones and chemistry, some people might find a need to address belief systems or require counselling for trauma or emotional grief to help resolve emotional stressors.

 References

Mate, G. (2008). In the realm of hungry ghosts. Close encounters with addiction. Canadian Family Physician.

Randle, P. J., Garland, P. B., Hales, C. N., & Newsholme, E. A. (1963). The glucose fatty-acid cycle its role in insulin sensitivity and the metabolic disturbances of diabetes mellitus. The Lancet, 281(7285), 785–789. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(63)91500-9

Peat, R. (1997). From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in context.

Selye, H. (1987). Stress without distress. In Society, stress, and disease, Vol. 5: Old age. (pp. 257–262). http://doi.org/10.1080/00228958.1983.10517713

 

Autoimmunity part 2: The autoimmune paleo diet - The Pro's and Cons

Where's the ice cream?!.jpg

 In this post I’m going to explore the mechanisms of the recommended autoimmune paleo diet (AIPD)  and suggest why it has very useful short term applications which are a mixed bag of interventions, reductionisms and shouldn’t be considered as a long term solution.

 In the last autoimmunity post you might remember how scientists like Polly Matzinger give an insight of auto immune disease that’s often not given enough credit. In summary of the danger theory, which is the body recognising self and the potentially damaged self. These damaged tissues be they thyroid or another tissue, is marked for removal from the system to prevent more damage occurring. The body is a pretty impressive organism that should be credited with being able to recognise its own tissues and respond with an effective response to restore best working order. So why should we discount this theory?  It’s essential to remember that a significant driver of autoimmunity is the increased prevalence of the disease in females (some 10 x more than males)  is driven by estrogen, estrogen like compounds and their ubiquity in the environment. Recently I’ve seen more people in the preceding months with vitiligo than I have seen in my entire lifetime but then I do live in a very polluted city.

 The recommendations for the autoimmune paleo diet protocol has some positives but the thought process behind such a diet has shortcomings and it’s important to tease out why it can be successful for some. I’ve always found the idea that a paleo lithic diet be entertained for health somewhat problematic. Archaeological specimens of older adults are generally lacking, suggesting mortality ranges commonly found between 20-40 year old samples (Trinkaus, 2011). That’s not to say that there weren’t older adults, ,but to base the efficacy of a diet strategy on a previous era without any data is problematic.

 There are several reasons why the AIPD might have some positive outcomes.

1.     It removes many offending compounds that are known to irritate the digestive tract. Sweeteners,  emulsifiers and thickeners are well documented to increase intestinal inflammation. Gums like guar, locust bean and Irish sea moss (carrageenan) can cause substantial damage over time and is also implicated in blood sugar regulation and diabetes. http://diabetes.diabetesjournals.org/content/67/Supplement_1/770-P?fbclid=IwAR1W8LRbx1fSu02Tr3b19ANtu2qpkZRhnwySvCj8uUC4TpRhvzypNH6lERg

2.     Alcohol is restricted. It should come as no surprise that alcohol has the capacity to affect multiple aspects of function. Most forms of alcohol contain phytoestrogens and just like long term soy consumption has the capacity to influence the body as a source of external estrogens . Additionally, many other additives like yeasts, colorants and preservative like sulphites appear equally problematic. Drinking alcohol in moderation isn’t necessarily problematic but the more susceptible that one is to estrogen issues, alcohol will often be problematic. I have seen many old ladies in their 90’s have been prone to a tipple of sherry or whiskey.

3.     Nuts, seeds and oils which are high in unstable unsaturated fatty acids are also restricted ,decreasing lipid/fat oxidation and improve mitochondrial function. The restriction of grains can also be useful for a similar reasoning and grains like millet, sorghum and barley are known to slow metabolism, but the action of seeds and grains can promote increased intestinal serotonin and histamine production, increasing the burden and damage to digestive function. Both poly and monounsaturated fats appear to promote compromised liver function, degrade metabolism and contribute to obesity.

4.     Nightshades, legumes, egg whites and gluten are well known for their role in irritability of the digestive system.

When all is said and done, there’s every reason why many people should feel better when removing these usual suspects. But there are problems with the AIPD and I have seen individuals who despite following this protocol still present with both digestive and energy issues, primarily because deficits in energy still arise and potential autoimmune reactions persist. Given some of the problems associated with determining cause and effect of specific interventions. It would be easy to speculate why someone who was prone to eating lots of fast food, high in unstable oils, high fructose corn syrups, preservatives, binding agents and suffering autoimmune, digestive, energy and other hormone disturbances might respond well to this in the short term?

 

There’s another plus to the AIPD - it includes fruit but there’s a caveat that natural sugars which include fructose should be kept to a minimum. There’s also an emphasis on eating fruits that are high in intestinal irritating seeds like berries. Carbohydrate is essential for optimal energy production. It promotes adequate carbon dioxide production and allows more efficient energy production and oxygenation of tissues that you just don’t get with sustained fat oxidation. Even refined table sugar shouldn’t be frowned upon and would only be problematic if your diet contained large amounts of refined sugar and devoid of other key nutrients like fats, proteins, and lack of potassium or magnesium as an example.

 

So is the AIPD useful? Yes, but it’s extremely limited. So how about a strategy that allows function to improve systemically rather than in isolation? Studies are limited on the effectiveness of AIPD. Whilst not autoimmune as such, a study that utilised the AIPD in patients with IBD (irritable bowel disease) completed remission in 11/15patients or 73% (Konijeti et al., 2017). That’s great, but it shouldn’t be surprising, if you’re removing all the intestinal irritants and this reasoning should extend to some improvements in autoimmune patients, resolving digestive function should follow. Gut function improved but markers of inflammation such as CRP did not, and one participant withdrew due to irritation from raw food consumption.

 

Aspects of the autoimmune and or autointoxication theory of disease is derived from Elie Metchnikoff’s work on immunology, bacteria and gut function (Metchnikoff & Metchnikoff, 1908). Metchnikoff proposed that death and disease started in the colon. Whilst there’s little doubt  that optimising gut function has many beneficial effects, problems arise beyond the digestive tract that might occur in otherwise healthy diets. The bowel can be a hospitable place for problematic bacteria when hydrochloric acid is low, and motility is slow induced by a low energy/thyroid state. Metchnikoff proposed that beneficial strains of bacteria can be useful to prevent unwanted maladies related to bowel function. However he was keen to point out that animals blessed with longevity often shared features of high metabolic rates and low levels of gut bacteria. This may explain why supplemental probiotic studies are not consistent in results and may simply act as a competing factor against more problematic bacteria (Goldenberg et al., 2015). The AIPD preference for more fermented goodies might be useful, but more is definitely not better. As food is poorly digested and bacterial metabolites increase so does endotoxin, intestinal hyperpermeability (leaky gut) and changes to biochemistry and hormones.

 I won’t discuss dairy produce here as it’s rarely the issue, the stressed digestive system has a problem with dairy products. I have seen countless clients return to eating dairy products like cheese, ice cream and  milks.

Eating ice cream & walking in the sunshine is an easy way to lower aspects of autoimmunity.jpg

It’s rarely the dairy that’s at fault, it’s usually the stressed digestive system that’s the real issue.

The AIPD, well there’s plenty that can be improved upon to create longer lasting function without the need for reductionist notions like the greener, the more natural, the better. Especially the problems that have been known for many decades that cruciferous/brassica vegetables high in isothiocyanates and glucosinolates, are well known to increase levels of cyanide in tissues and are anti-metabolic in nature disrupting thyroid function.

Siri what is broccoli?.jpg

Broccoli was not a palaeolithic food

Brassica vegetables may have very little place in resolving autoimmune diseases.

The most effective form of preventing autoimmunity might be to keep metabolism at its best working order rather than slowing it down. The fascination of broccoli in the modern diet is not without paradox.  Broccoli certainly wasn’t consumed in the palaeolithic era, although other cruciferous vegetables may have been (Buck, 1956). It’s elevation to farmed commodity and food stuff appeared to take place in Hellenic culture and more rapidly promoted to support the invading Roman army.

Promoting a diet that has easily digested nutrients, energy and facilitates available thyroid hormone, addressing internal and external sources of estrogen, without increasing stress responses may be the most pragmatic approach of any diet to decrease autoimmune responses. Eating plenty of fruit, sugars and honey combined with good quality proteins, moderate saturated fat and low in unsaturated fats, seeds might be the best autoimmune diet.

Another problematic aspect of the AIPD is the emphasis on Omega 3 fatty acids such as DHA to lower inflammation and this isn’t limited to poorly constructed diets but a common error in autoimmune and inflammatory protocols (Constantin et al., 2018). Many studies and review such as this invoke the antioxidant effect properties of omega 3s due to their ability to lower markers such as triglycerides, cholesterol and crease metabolism. Surprisingly when you decrease metabolic rate, you decrease metabolic function, therefore inflammatory and oxidative markers are reduced. Sustained omega 3 and other unsaturated fatty acids accumulate in the brain and liver and decrease aerobic metabolism through sustained lipid peroxidation, especially so when carbohydrate metabolism is lost.


‘ Calorific restriction and well established diet supplementation with omega 3 regulates total cholesterol, LDL-C and triglycerides.’ (Constantin et al, 2018).

 In essence this has as much benefit as taking medication to lower cholesterol. Of course eating less calories produces less inflammation and if calories are restricted below a certain threshold, this lowers metabolism, giving the impression of less oxidation. If you’re going to support the notion that taking omega 3s lowers inflammation and as many espouse, lowers cardiovascular risk, the net effect will be degraded cholesterol that’s prone to oxidation and left with an excess of fatty acids also prone to lipid peroxidation. If we’re going to help more people with a so called autoimmune disease, perhaps we need to be thinking a little more holistically? If estrogen is a main driver of a perceived autoimmune state then improving its excretion through adequate energy, liver function and robust biology should be the answer. There’s no doubt that improving digestive function is helpful but the current zeitgeist, promoting plenty of undercooked vegetables in their most natural state, high in metabolic inhibitors is restrictive to decreasing aspects of autoimmunity.


References: 

Buck, P. A. (1956). Origin and taxonomy of broccoli. Economic Botany. http://doi.org/10.1007/BF02899000

Constantin, M., Nita, I., Olteanu, R., Constantin, T., Bucur, S., Matei, C., & Raducan, A. (2018). Significance and impact of dietary factors on systemic lupus erythematosus pathogenesis (Review). Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine. http://doi.org/10.3892/etm.2018.6986

Goldenberg, J. Z., Lytvyn, L., Steurich, J., Parkin, P., Mahant, S., & Johnston, B. C. (2015). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Vol. 12). http://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD004827.pub4

Konijeti, G. G., Kim, N., Lewis, J. D., Groven, S., Chandrasekaran, A., Grandhe, S., … Torkamani, A. (2017). Efficacy of the Autoimmune Protocol Diet for Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. http://doi.org/10.1097/MIB.0000000000001221

Metchnikoff, E., & Metchnikoff, I. I. (1908). The Prolongation of Life: Optimistic Studies. Our post human future. Consequences of the biotechnology revolution. Retrieved from http://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=U8bgKGvZJV0C&pgis=1

Trinkaus, E. (2011). Late Pleistocene adult mortality patterns and modern human establishment. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1018700108

https://balancedbodymind.com/blog/2019/3/7/auto-immune-disease-is-it-really-in-your-genes-part-1




Free Happy Hormones Copy

happyhormones2-4.jpg

Feel free to share around.


Download Happy Hormones

I wrote this book several years again and am in the process of creating a new, more complete text on the subject. Please feel free to download and share. All I ask is that you leave some comments on what you liked or disliked about it.

If you need any assistance with resolving energy, sleep, digestion, mood, libido, pain or other hormone issues then please check out the members area for more information or even the free resources section.

New logo Luara.jpg


                      

Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) - inheritance, environment and stress.

Estrogen excess.png

Poly Cystic Ovary Syndrome - inheritance, environment and stress. Recently I took on a client who was diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a slightly wayward insulin profile and the ‘best practice’ of oral contraceptives and Glucophage (metformin- blood sugar regulating drug) were suggested. My client had started bleeding daily and was informed that this was normal for three months but would help out with PCOS and weight gain. However this seemed at odds with my current knowledge and experience of biology and endocrinology. There are plenty of studies highlighting the diabetes inducing effects of estrogen and oral contraceptives.

Glycemia constitutes a fundamental homeostatic variable, and hence its alteration can lead to a number of pathophysiological conditions affecting the internal milieu of the human being. Since the early 1960s, the intake of oral contraceptives has been associated with an increased risk of developing disorders of glucose metabolism.(Cortés & Alfaro, 2014)

Is best practice the efforts of a global network of doctors or simply a corporate led strategy? Don’t get me wrong; the world is full of competent, passionate and well-meaning doctors who signed up to help others. But the concept of both best practice and clinical governance seem a utopian ideal when those that are responsible for drug development are companies whose primary function is to make as much money as possible, without appropriate direction.

Joseph Dumitt in his book Drugs for Life (2012) highlights that there hasn’t been a scientist at the head of a pharmaceutical company for many years and their direction being driven by economists and marketers. As there are many examples of absolutist statements regarding drugs and their positive effects on health that lack congruence over time, you’ll forgive me for sounding like a conspiracy theorist. How about hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for better health despite its negative outcomes related to cardiovascular events or cancer? Or statin therapy for decreasing unnecessary risk factors based upon skewed data and early terminated trails with no public access to trial data (Lorgeril & Rabaeus, 2016)?

Back to PCOS. I have written previously about the effects of metformin and its use in gestational diabetes, and the problems it poses trans-generationally. It’s possible to suggest that the failure to act with appropriate biological interventions perpetuates the cycle of acquired traits from parents that are passed to offspring, treated ineffectively and generations of reproductive (and other tissues) tissue conditions continue without being resolved.

The biologist Jean Baptiste Lamarck's fourth law stated:

“ Everything which has been acquired..or changed in the organisation of an individual during its lifetime is preserved in the reproductive process and is transmitted to the next generation by those who experienced the alterations. “

It's worth pointing out that this is not isolated to the female of the species as the factors below have been shown to be instrumental in reproductive issues (testicular dysgenesis, hypospadias etc) in males.

The environment has been shown to be instrumental in the development of reproductive tissue disorders, diabetes and cancer but more emphasis is placed on the individual and their food choices rather than acknowledgement of industrial responsibility. Positive associations between levels of polychlorinated bisphenyls (PCBs), pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) have been confirmed in multivariate data analysis (Yang et al., 2015). Relationships between increases of luteinising hormone (LH) PCO, hyperandrogenism, annovulation, insulin resistance and pollutants are significant and may add to issues of detection, due to the subtle long term perturbations that often affect endocrine function. Stress, other pollutants and medications contribute to further problems that burden not only reproductive tissue but also other organizational hormones such as thyroid hormone.

PCOS is defined medically by the following: One of the main problems of treating PCOS with contraception is the many studies that clearly show a relationship between estrogen and decreased insulin sensitivity (Godsland et al., 1992)(Cortés & Alfaro, 2014). Progestin’s, the synthetic version of progesterone, also pose many problems but this has not deterred the inclusion of estrogen and progestin contraceptives as another inappropriate form of treatment. The burden of estrogen induced by the sources suggested above comes at a cost and it’s well known that an excess of estrogen can suppress thyroid function (thyroid is necessary for detoxification of estrogen and another organisational hormone progesterone.

Both thyroid and progesterone are known to improve insulin sensitivity and can create beneficial changes to disorganised tissue induced by an excess of estrogen. Thyroid nodules and uterine fibroids appear to be intimately linked by an excess of estrogen (Kim et al., 2010) and suppression of thyroid tumours can be achieved by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) suppression by thyroxin supplementation (Grussendorf, Reiners, Paschke, & Wegscheider, 2011). An old rambling on thyroid nodules and fibroids.


Breaking the cycle requires interventions that address inheritance, environment and individual stressors. Strategies that involve adequate nutrition that build biology not reduce it, use of protective compounds like progesterone, thyroid and adequate carbohydrate can be of great benefit. Although this stands in contrast to the best practice of contraception, blood sugar medication and poorly thought out nutritional advice of restricting carbohydrates. As the environment appears to drive most of the increasing numbers of issues like PCOS, it becomes important to increase robustness, restrict exposure to what we can control and become more adaptable to what we can’t.

To find out more about coaching for these issues.

References:

Burkhardt, R. W. (2013). Lamarck, evolution, and the inheritance of acquired characters. Genetics, 194(4), 793–805. http://doi.org/10.1534/genetics.113.151852

Cortés, M. E., & Alfaro, A. a. (2014). The effects of hormonal contraceptives on glycemic regulation. The Linacre Quarterly, 81(3), 209–218. http://doi.org/10.1179/2050854914Y.0000000023

Dumit, J. (2012). Drugs for Life. Duke University Press.

Godsland, I. F., Walton, C., Felton, C., Proudler, A., Patel, A., & Wynn, V. (1992). Insulin resistance, secretion, and metabolism in users of oral contraceptives. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 74(1), 64–70. http://doi.org/10.1210/jcem.74.1.1530790

Grussendorf, M., Reiners, C., Paschke, R., & Wegscheider, K. (2011). Reduction of thyroid nodule volume by levothyroxine and iodine alone and in combination: A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96(9), 2786–2795. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-0356

Kim, M.-H., Park, Y. R., Lim, D.-J., Yoon, K.-H., Kang, M.-I., Cha, B.-Y., … Son, H.-Y. (2010). The relationship between thyroid nodules and uterine fibroids. Endocrine Journal, 57(7), 615–21. http://doi.org/10.1507/endocrj.K10E-024

Lorgeril, M. De, & Rabaeus, M. (2016). Beyond confusion and controversy, can we evaluate the real efficacy and safety of cholesterol-lowering with statins? Journal of Controversies in Biomedical Research, 1(1), 67. http://doi.org/10.15586/jcbmr.2015.11

Is testosterone replacement therapy necessary?

In a world where it is increasingly normal to be convinced that we fall into a risk classification, need a treatment and can convince our doctor accordingly, negating any experience that he or she might have. The marketeers and economists that run pharmaceutical companies are doing a great job of increasing profits. Before we keep looking for the next wonder treatment we should take stock of what food and exercise can do.

Testosterone can be increased by some very simple strategies such as:

  1. Having adequate liver and vitamin A in the diet to assist in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone - the base hormone responsible for production of testosterone and other androgens.

  2. Ensuring that adequate energy and thyroid hormone are available to maintain communication of the hypothalamic- pituitary- (signalling centres for hormone production-brain to testicles) gonadal axis.

  3. Understanding stress, sleep and interactions between excesses of estrogen and their impact on testosterone production.

  4. Less understood but increasingly keeping mobile communication devices out of pockets and bags that are close to reproductive tissue, including females (ovaries, endometrium etc), appears to be a pragmatic approach in the future. Steroid producing tissues have increased production of problematic compounds that may be prone to damage.

Here's some of the technical aspects to the situation that are taken from a recent assignment as part of my masters degree..

Introduction

Testosterone is a hormone found in both males and females but is the major reproductive hormone in men that also has a variety of other beneficial functions for maintaining physical and psychological aspects to health. Testosterone levels may decrease with disease and/or be part of an age related decline of output. The use of testosterone supplementation has increased substantially in recent years counter these states, primarily due to increased marketing as an agent of change for energy, strength, fat loss and sexual function. Whilst its use appears beneficial in some areas, caution has been recommended on the effects of T supplementation use and it’s effects on the cardiovascular system.

 Diagnosis

Testosterone (T) is the most important androgen found in males and produced primarily within the testes, when low it is defined as hypogonadism. Hypogonadism is classified as either primary, derived from the testes or secondary, which involves the hypothalamus, pituitary or derived from illness or disease. A low serum testosterone (<300ng/dL) is suggestive, but not definitive of hypogonadism and measurements of luteinising (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is used to establish a primary or secondary diagnosis (Crawford & Kennedy, 2016). A worry trend is that despite striking increases of testosterone prescription a substantial amount (approximately 29% in this review) of patients often fail to have their levels checked prior to undertaking testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). (Corona G, Rastrelli, Maseroli, Sforza, & Maggi, 2015). Additionally only 45 % had their testosterone levels checked during or post TRT intervention.

Low testosterone and cardiovascular risk

Previous studies have highlighted an increase in all cause mortality associated with low testosterone levels in men (Araujo et al., 2011). Conditions that increase risk of mortality related to low testosterone are increased abdominal obesity, inflammatory biomarkers, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However the diagnosis of an isolated low testosterone level should be qualified by ruling out other potential diagnosis such as long-term illness, nutritional deficiencies and other endocrine issues such as subclinical or overt hypothyroidism.

Testosterone supplementation and risks

A number of studies and meta analysis have demonstrated a number of beneficial effects of TRT which extend to increased sexual satisfaction, muscle mass, strength mood and metabolic function (Corona G et al., 2015) (Gagliano-Jucá & Basaria, 2017). However the suggested risk to increased CV adverse events have appeared vague in many studies and previous extrapolations/anecdotes between men having increased levels of testosterone (and therefore increased cardiac risk) and females having less testosterone and more oestrogen were not just problematic but incorrect. Many studies have correlated low testosterone to low biomarkers of health and increased cardiovascular disease (Pastuszak, Kohn, Estis, & Lipshultz, 2017) (Kloner, Carson, Dobs, Kopecky, & Mohler, 2016).

TRT reductionism and treating symptoms

A comprehensive review of the data compiled by Oskui et al (Mesbah Oskui, P., French, W.J., Herring, 2013) described the major CV implications of TRT which can be observed below. The authors draw attention to previously conducted studies, that did not show any relationships between low levels of testosterone and CV risk and suggest that both the subfraction of testosterone (Total T compared to Free T) and method of analysis for CVD were inappropriate and therefore unreliable for inclusion. 

Cardiovascular analysis Studies Major findings Association between T and mortality 8 8/8 studies found relationship between low T and increased all cause and CV mortality. Type 2 DM 6 6/6 studies showed improved insulin sensitivity through HOMA-IR/HgA!c and improved blood glucose Cholesterol 3 2/3 studies found no change to LDL/HDL from TRT Markers of inflammation (primarily C reactive protein CRP) 8 4/8 studies found reduced CRP Intima media thickness 8 8/8 found an inverse relationship between low T and IMT

The above studies reviewed by the authors, established a link between low levels of testosterone and increases in mortality (all cause and CV), insulin sensitivity and increases in intima media thickness that are resolved by TRT. Yet markers for lipids and inflammation markers such as CRP are less convincing. Hypothyroidism is related to low testosterone and hypogonadic states mainly through hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. Treatment of hypothyroid and subclinical hypothyroid states also resolves low testosterone and hypogonadic states, decreases intima media thickness, improves insulin sensitivity and decreases lipid levels (Crawford & Kennedy, 2016), (Krassas, Poppe, & Glinoer, 2010),(Donnelly & White, 2000) (Gao, Zhang, Zhang, Yang, & Chen, 2013). Is TRT the correct therapy for many males, given a) the rapid increases in often undiagnosed and prescription and b) when hypogonadic states, that have similar (cardiac) manifestations and are improved beyond the effects of TRT, are resolved with thyroid hormone?

Another factor concerning reliability of the studies used in previous meta analysis is the size to determine true risk between CV adverse events and TRT (Onasanya et al., 2016). The authors suggesting that to achieve a two-sided p value of 0.05 and power of 80% some 17664 participants would need to study to clarify any relationship. Observational data conducted over 5 years suggested that control groups treated with testosterone in short term had a lower mortality (HR 0.88 95 % CI 0:84 - 0.93) than controls (Wallis et al., 2016). From the meta analysis and other studies discussed above both age (>65) and predisposition to existing disease states may indicate the likelihood of adverse CV events when treated with TRT.

Another draw back of meta-analysis is the inclusion of data and bias produced by pharmaceutical companies that may not be adequately reflected or assessed. Much like cardiovascular end point studies being scarce. Testosterone studies that are funded by financial interests are usually in place to validate the benefits of TRT and fail to evaluate CV adverse events as end points. The increased adequate sample size needed to validate the safety and efficacy of this treatment often increase cost and decrease profit margin over time. The many studies that have been conducted so far, show much smaller sample sizes and a wide range of TRT delivery and dosing.

In a recent case crossover analysis that is not included in any current meta analysis, Layton et al (Layton et al., 2018) found a unique association between testosterone injections and short term cardio (and cerebrovascular) events in older men. Increased associations with myocardial infarction and stroke, post testosterone injection showed odds ratio (OR) were increased for all outcomes, OR =1.45 (95%: CI 1.07, 1.98).

Summary

Testosterone replacement does appear to have many positive effects on a number of markers related to cardiovascular health which include sexual performance, increased muscle mass, metabolic health, physical performance and decreasing mortality in a younger population. However, despite the many benefits of TRT the use of this therapy may have significant risk in late onset hypogonadal states, in ages >65 years of age, those susceptible to conditions associated with erythrocytosis and an association with acute cardiac events exists. It remains essential to ensure that not only adequate analysis of hypogonadal states are present but to ascertain if low testosterone levels are merely a symptom of other endocrine disturbances, such as hypothyroidism which has striking similarities to low levels of testosterone.

Want some more free resources on hormones?

References:

1.Araujo, A. B., Dixon, J. M., Suarez, E. a, Murad, M. H., Guey, L. T., & Wittert, G. a. (2011). Clinical review: Endogenous testosterone and mortality in men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96(10), 3007–19. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-1137

2.Basaria, S., Davda, M. N., Travison, T. G., Ulloor, J., Singh, R., & Bhasin, S. (2013). Risk Factors Associated with Cardiovascular Events During Testosterone Administration in Older Men with Mobility Limitation. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 68(2), 153–60. http://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gls138

  1. Corona G, G., Rastrelli, G., Maseroli, E., Sforza, A., & Maggi, M. (2015). Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk: A Review. The World Journal of Men’s Health, 33(3), 130–42. http://doi.org/10.5534/wjmh.2015.33.3.130

  2. Crawford, M., & Kennedy, L. (2016). Testosterone replacement therapy: role of pituitary and thyroid in diagnosis and treatment. Translational Andrology and Urology, 5(6), 850–858. http://doi.org/10.21037/tau.2016.09.01

  3. Donnelly, P., & White, C. (2000). Testicular dysfunction in men with primary hypothyroidism; Reversal of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with replacement thyroxine. Clinical Endocrinology, 52(2), 197–201. http://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2265.2000.00918.x

  4. Gagliano-Jucá, T., & Basaria, S. (2017). Trials of testosterone replacement reporting cardiovascular adverse events. Asian Journal of Andrology, 19(May), 1–7. http://doi.org/10.4103/aja.aja

  5. Gao, N., Zhang, W., Zhang, Y., Yang, Q., & Chen, S. (2013). Carotid intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism: A meta-analysis. Atherosclerosis, 227(1), 18–25. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.070

  6. Kloner, R. A., Carson, C., Dobs, A., Kopecky, S., & Mohler, E. R. (2016). Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2015.12.005

  7. Krassas, G. E., Poppe, K., & Glinoer, D. (2010). Thyroid Function and Human Reproductive Health. Endocrine Reviews, 31(5), 702–755. http://doi.org/10.1210/er.2009-0041

  8. Layton, J. B., Li, D., Meier, C. R., Sharpless, J. L., Stürmer, T., & Brookhart, M. A. (2018). Injection testosterone and adverse cardiovascular events: A case-crossover analysis. Clinical Endocrinology. http://doi.org/10.1111/cen.13574

  9. Mesbah Oskui, P., French, W.J., Herring, M. J. et al. (2013). Testosterone and the Cardiovascular System: A comprehensive Review of the Clinical Literature. Journal of the American Heart Association. http://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.113.000272

  10. Onasanya, O., Iyer, G., Lucas, E., Lin, D., Singh, S., & Alexander, G. C. (2016). Association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events: an overview of systematic reviews. The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(16)30215-7

  11. Pastuszak, A. W., Kohn, T. P., Estis, J., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2017). Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 14(9), 1095–1103. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.06.015

  12. Roos, A., Bakker, S. J. L., Links, T. P., Gans, R. O. B., & Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R. (2007). Thyroid function is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome in euthyroid subjects. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 92(2), 491–6. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2006-1718

  13. Udovcic, M., Pena, R. H., Patham, B., Tabatabai, L., & Kansara, A. (2017). Hypothyroidism and the Heart. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal, 13(2), 55–59. http://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-13-2-55

  14. Wallis, C. J. D., Lo, K., Lee, Y., Krakowsky, Y., Garbens, A., Satkunasivam, R., … Nam, R. K. (2016). Survival and cardiovascular events in men treated with testosterone replacement therapy: an intention-to-treat observational cohort study. The Lancet. Diabetes & Endocrinology, 4(6), 498–506. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(16)00112-1

  15. Xu, L., Freeman, G., Cowling, B. J., & Schooling, C. M. (2013). Testosterone therapy and cardiovascular events among men: A systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled randomized trials. BMC Medicine, 11(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-108

 

Being holistic versus (holistic) critical thinking.

sunrise-2.png

Is being 'holistic' an advantage to holistic critical thinking? It’s relatively easy to get drawn into a naturalistic fallacy of consuming all foods in their most raw natural state. Perhaps you’re someone who went from a fast food diet, where you didn’t feel your best, to consuming more whole foods, fresh fruit and vegetables? It’s easy to see how a switch and positive changes can occur in the short term. The next step is to start preaching to the masses how sugar is bad, how your life will be saved with green smoothies, nuts, seeds and coffee butt cleanses. For the record this is a waste of coffee and not to far from what I was preaching a decade ago. So what does it mean to be holistic?There’s a large movement within the health fitness and wellness industry (and lay people) that are drawn to  'holistic' thinking, and their definition is often enforced by the fallacy that everything in its most natural state is better for human health. This appears to include foods like nut milks (yes you can milk a nut), kale smoothies, seed oils like flax and undercooked broccoli and other greens, despite their negative effects on human health when consumed in substantial amounts. It’s a religion, and much like religion and with this mind-set it isn’t going to make you any healthier. I’ll make reference here to the late, great Beastie Boy, MCA who despite being a vegan and a Buddhist died far too early from throat cancer.

It is true that eating plenty of foods in their most natural state f(or some foods) can be important for health. But the image on the right highlights the faulty narrative of being holistic without thinking about the consequences. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meats and the like require minimal processing but in the quest for longevity, taste and profit, adding preservatives and flavour enhancers causes our food sources to become problematic. The so called ‘holistic’ folk get lost in this narrative urging your diet to become abundant in the rawest, greenest and brownest foods, that are most indigestible and contain potent inhibitors of biological function.

To integrate a level of holism into nutrition and function requires a level of critical thinking. What do these foods contain? How do they affect physiology? It’s well known that the brassica vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower and sprouts contain potent compounds that decrease energy output. These goitregens inhibit thyroid output and isothiocyanates found in cruciferous vegetables affects TPO or thyroid peroxidase, both of which are exacerbated when iodine uptake or restriction is present. Research tends to support these problematic effects (Choi & Kim, 2014)(Truong, Baron-Dubourdieu, Rougier, & Guénel, 2010), but much attention is focused on the smaller compounds that seem to work well in test tubes, rather than its global effects. As the environment becomes more stressful for biology do we need more building or reducing factors within our control?

The environment can be a harsh place. There are plenty of pollutants that have a negative effect on fertility, metabolism and other key endocrine aspects of health, some of which are industrial, others purposively added to food (arguably another form of industry) (Rajpert-De Meyts, Skakkebaek, & Toppari, 2000)(Upson, Harmon, & Baird, 2016). We can argue that the environment has always been a harsh place and adaptation has taken place as a response to selective pressures at the heart of evolution. Yet currently we are heading towards a tipping point, as environmental stimulants appear to be at the heart of acquired biological damage that is inherited by offspring. Cancer, fertility and other metabolic diseases are more common than ever and yet the approach is to keep seeking the magic bullet to ameliorate the fate that awaits many of us.

If we were to ask:

What enhances biological function, makes us more robust and allows us to have a stronger conversation with a stressful environment?

Rather than succumb to its stressors.

The highway to health

The highway to health

A biological system in its best working order could be represented, as an infinite road stretching into the  distance, perhaps with the odd bump along the way or a slight deviation but an ability to get back on track is available. Compare that to the inhibitory T-junction where the body cannot function as the clear straight road, it deviates from its true organised direction. The journey is laboured and restrictive. The ability to flux and respond to stressors is key and adequate energy is an essential component of reorganisation.

Nutrition is an important factor for such conversations with the environment. Eating a diet that is dominated with foods that are difficult to digest, decrease energy availability and create more stress are not going to make chatting any easier. If we make the effort to understand what keeps a cell and its mitochondria functioning at its most efficient state, we can understand why aspects such as sugar, adequate protein, moderate exercise, light and other factors, can play a role in overcoming current stimulus that decrease function and increase disease states.

The following article is definitely worth a read for an understanding of the concepts that I have talked about. http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/vegetables.shtm

References:

Choi, W. J., & Kim, J. (2014). Dietary factors and the risk of thyroid cancer: a review. Clinical Nutrition Research, 3(2), 75–88. http://doi.org/10.7762/cnr.2014.3.2.75

Rajpert-De Meyts, E., Skakkebaek, N. E., & Toppari, J. (2000). Testicular Cancer Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Endocrine Aspects. Endotext. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25905224

Truong, T., Baron-Dubourdieu, D., Rougier, Y., & Guénel, P. (2010). Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide case-control study in New Caledonia. Cancer Causes and Control, 21(8), 1183–1192. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9545-2

Upson, K., Harmon, Q. E., & Baird, D. D. (2016). Soy-based infant formula feeding and ultrasound-detected uterine fibroids among young African-American women with no prior clinical diagnosis of fibroids. Environmental Health Perspectives, 124(6), 769–775. http://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510082

Gestational diabetes and metformin-Is that the best that medical thinking has to offer?

Gestational diabetes or elevated blood sugar is often treated with metformin to improve blood sugar levels and considered the standard approach to treating gestational diabetes. The research suggests that it has little negative effects on the pregnant mother. However, does significant risks to both mother and baby if the incidence of premature birth count? Here are a few aspects to consider regarding the use of metformin to control blood sugar during pregnancy. A study of patients receiving a dose of metformin, combination of Clomiphene citrate (CC) and metformin both faired better than CC alone for the induction of ovulation (Neveu, Granger, St-Michel, & Lavoie, 2007).  As the combined group showed no benefit compared to metformin alone, one might consider that metformin alone may be considered for the positive effects.

In another study metformin and diet interventions showed a significant outcome compared to non-metformin-diet interventions. The metformin diet showed a reduction of 14 adverse events in a group of 76 expectant mothers, compared to the non-treated group of 36 adverse events out of 76 pregnancies (Glueck et al., 2013).

Thatcher and Jackson (Thatcher & Jackson, 2006) compared pregnancies of 188 women. 61 experienced miscarriages and 11 of those had stopped taking metformin, suggesting other abnormalities beyond metformin’s actions. 81% of women with pregnancies before metformin, 67% had prior miscarriages. 37% of these also miscarried again. Whilst metformin appeared to show minimal effects to mother and foetus 22% were born prematurely.

Whilst metformin has shown favourable outcomes in PCOS states, questions around pertinent biological mechanisms should warrant further discussion. It’s well known that two key endocrine actions may be compromised during the failure to achieve full gestation. Estrogen induces hypoxia in the uterus (Peat, 1997) and failure to produce adequate progesterone to counter the effects of estrogen may be implicated in the commonly fragile time around weeks 9-10 of pregnancy and incidence of miscarriage.

A concern of metformin are its affect transplacentally. Metformin appears to influence testicular size in males and affects sertoli cells. In females it may also lead to decreased androgen synthesis. Birth weight percentile is also significantly lower in pregnancies treated with metformin (Bertoldo, Faure, Dupont, & Froment, 2014)I Metformin has generally appeared safe in expecting mothers but considerable concern should be made regarding its long term effects to offspring and development most notably to reproductive tissues.

Hypothyroidism is a key factor in maintenance of pregnancy and alongside progesterone, thyroid hormone deficiency can be implicated in poor cellular energetics, production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and blood sugar regulation. There remains much debate about the issue of subclinical hypothyroidism, values and when to treat and perhaps metformin’s role despite showing some promises may be treating a symptom related to insulin sensitivity.

So perhaps these questions might be more pertinent before prescribing an agent that shows potentially negative effects to the fetus?

  1. What is the nutrition of the mother, is it enough and does it contain enough nutrients to enhance/maintain adequate progesterone/thyroid production?
  2. Is estrogen increasing at a rate that suppresses progesterone/thyroid levels and persistently decreases insulin sensitivity?
  3. Is there enough carbohydrate in the diet to ensure that carbohydrate is effectively utilised instead of persistent conversion of fats, increasing overall stress to both mother and fetus?
  4. Are the values of hypothyroidism and the identification of subclinical/functional hypothyroid factors appropriate?
  5. Is gestational diabetes a reflection of the above points?

The use of metformin, without questioning these mechanisms, remains at best a reduced treatment that fails to address a range of biological interactions and function.

References:

Bertoldo, M. J., Faure, M., Dupont, J., & Froment, P. (2014). Impact of metformin on reproductive tissues: an overview from gametogenesis to gestation. Annals of Translational Medicine2(6), 55. http://doi.org/10.3978/j.issn.2305-5839.2014.06.04

Glueck, C. J., Goldenberg, N., Pranikoff, J., Khan, Z., Padda, J., & Wang, P. (2013). Effects of metformin-diet intervention before and throughout pregnancy on obstetric and neonatal outcomes in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Current Medical Research and Opinion29(1), 55–62. http://doi.org/10.1185/03007995.2012.755121

Neveu, N., Granger, L., St-Michel, P., & Lavoie, H. B. (2007). Comparison of clomiphene citrate, metformin, or the combination of both for first-line ovulation induction and achievement of pregnancy in 154 women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Fertility and Sterility87(1), 113–120. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2006.05.069

Peat, R. (1997). From PMS to Menopause: Female Hormones in context.

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/glucose-sucrose-diabetes.shtml

Thatcher, S. S., & Jackson, E. M. (2006). Pregnancy outcome in infertile patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who were treated with metformin. Fertility and Sterility85(4), 1002–1009. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2005.09.047

Osteoporosis- could your exercise, nutrition and medical advice be better?

Osteoporosis and bone health, like many other aspects of optimal biology is a product of an organisms inputs and reactions to environmental stimulus. Osteoporosis is a condition like others, where prevention is often easier than the cure but perhaps the cure has been overcomplicated? Osteoporosis is a multifactorial musculoskeletal disease that is usually associated with the ageing process, decreased bone mineral density (BMD) and its tendency to fracture easily.       It’s clear that a number of factors that can be maintained throughout life to reduce the incidence of Osteoporosis in both men and women. Before we review those and compare with current guidelines, here’s some background info on the subject.

Primary Osteoporosis is the age related decline in men at around 70 and suggested as being a postmenopausal state, induced through the decreased production of estrogen in females. This last point is accepted in medical literature as the main cause of osteoporosis in females but may be severely flawed (more on this point later).

Secondary osteoporosis can be related to the following factors

Hypogonadism - testosterone/estrogen deficiency
Endocrine disease - Cushing’s syndrome, acromegaly, thyrotoxicosis, Addison’s disease and hyperparathyroidism
Dietary or assimilation deficiencies of calcium, vitamin K, vitamin D and other nutrients
Inflammation-rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus and ankylosing spondylitis
Neoplasms- Myleoma, lymphoma and leukaemia
Reduced physical activity
Medical drugs - corticosteroids, antiretroviral, antipsychotic, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, nicotine and excessive alcohol
Family history/genetics
Diabetes

The financial burden from osteoporosis generally, will increase from 98 Million Euros to 121 billion with proportional increases of 27.5 million to approximately 34 million people between the years 2010 to 2025 (Hernlund et al., 2013). Despite these huge burdens there appears to be a lack of well-designed educational programs that are geared at prevention of osteoporosis through non-pharmacological means.

The supplementation of vitamin D and calcium are well documented in osteoporosis strategies but a strategy to avoid these states are diets containing adequate calcium, vitamin A, K, magnesium (and others) adequate sunlight and moderate exercise.

Ok, so there’s a problem, it’s big business and there’s a lot of great info on how to avoid it right? Well no and here are the major points why I believe its not.

Diagnosis

 Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) is the recommended choice for osteoporosis diagnosis, serum calcium, phosphate, creatinine (with GFR) alkaline phosphatase, liver function, 25 OHD, total testosterone, estrogen CBC and 24 urinary calcium excretion are recommended for the interpretation of secondary causes of osteoporosis (Watts et al., 2012).

Hormones

Estrogen loss is touted as the most significant factor in decreasing BMD yet it’s action only retards resorption, or the removal of calcium from bone. Estrogen tends to inhibit the action of osteoclasts which ultimately reduce BMD. It’s the main reason the introduction of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) was considered as the primary treatment until its long-term use was found to induce clotting and cancer in women. So estrogen does not reverse Osteoporosis, it prevents further bone loss.

A variety of studies have suggested little influence of testosterone in males on BMD and that low estradiol levels combined with elevated sex hormone binding globulin appear to increase the loss of BMD (Cauley et al., 2010). A point worth noting from the correlation associated with higher estradiol levels and decreased BMD loss is that all participants in the study were recorded as having increased weight and BMD, which may influence skeletal modelling due to increased bone-loading parameters. Perhaps too much emphasis has been given to the suggestion that estrogen and its primary role of tissue proliferation amongst others, which should follow the course of age related decline?

Progesterone on the other hand has been shown to be a bone trophic or building factor that increases mineralisation of BMD, via osteoblasts (Prior, 1990). Stress increases cortisol and decreases progesterone binding at the receptor, with a preference for the glucocorticoid. Ray Peat (1997) points out that cortisol causes bone loss and its widely accepted that progesterone has an “antiglucocorticoid” action, it is reasonable to think that progesterone should protect against bone loss, and that it is a progesterone deficiency after menopause which is a major factor in the development of osteoporosis.

Thyrotoxicosis has been suggested as a mechanism of bone resorption but this appears inaccurate-  Ray Peat does a much better job at explaining this.

Medical treatment

Bisphosphonates are the first line medical treatment for treating osteoporosis and show modest changes to hip and vertebral BMD over 3 years. There use may come at a risk. Gastro intestinal side effects are well documented and in some the increase of osteonecrosis of the jaw has been observed. In some, the long-term use has been shown not only to increase the rate of fragility fracture but also to inhibit the healing process. It should be noted that adequate calcium and vitamin D in the diet are essential for bisphosphonate effectiveness

 Nutrition

 There tend to be two well-known stances to the fitness industries approach to nutrition. One, the transformation approach, where limiting of nutrients, particularly dairy and carbohydrates and intermittent fasting are the norm. Another, the holistic warrior whose consumption of chia seeds and all things green, raw and limiting of dairy and sugar again,  may be a factor into lowering BMD in later life. Calcium is an essential nutrient for bone health and dairy is indeed a great source of calcium. Here’s an old blog on the subject.

 It’s clear that adequate vitamin D is a nutrient that is important in BMD maintenance. It regulates calcium levels, decreases the production of parathyroid hormone, which is a potent resorption factor of skeletal calcium when calcium or vitamin D are low. Here are the main points that relate to diet.

  • Vitamin D in isolation and particularly high doses increases fracture rates (Janssen, Samson, & Verhaar, 2002)
  • Unless vitamin D is accompanied by adequate calcium, BMD can decrease further.
  • Vitamin K2 can prevent the calcification of soft tissues and help improve blood calcium levels (Masterjohn, 2007)
  • High meat and diets high in pulses and beans can have a negative effect on calcium levels due to their high phosphate levels.
  • Unless you assess other key nutrients like magnesium and the factors discussed above
  • Low diary intake can be associated with poor bone health.
  • The low carbohydrate, raw green and seed eating diet suggested by holistic health practitioners may contribute to lower BMD.

Exercise

Regular exercise has been touted as a significant factor in maintaining muscle mass and increasing BMD. But is the type of exercise that people are doing, increasingly in their younger years, contributing to better or worse outcomes to BMD. For bone to form adequate carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is essential. Some exercise regimes are so challenging, they contribute to excess levels of metabolic acidosis (lactic acid) and passing of CO2 from the body (worth noting that sugar consumption can also help to increase CO2 production) . Perhaps for exercise to be effective it should be light to moderate, with adequate rest periods that don’t mean that the participant is lying in a pool their sweat and vomit.

Walking, strength training with adequate rest, yoga, Pilates and other modes of moderate exercise appear most suitable for modest improvements to bone health but the diet and hormone factors are key.

It’s clear that osteoporosis is in the rise but it can be reversed. But instead of heading advice like cutting out dairy, eating lots of uncooked vegetables and training to complete exhaustion. There are more suitable mechanisms for improving bone health

References:

Cauley, J. A., Ewing, S. K., Taylor, B. C., Fink, H. A., Ensrud, K. E., Bauer, D. C., … Orwoll, E. S. (2010). Sex steroid hormones in older men: longitudinal associations with 4.5-year change in hip bone mineral density--the osteoporotic fractures in men study. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 95(9), 4314–23. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2009-2635

Hernlund, E., Svedbom, a, Ivergård, M., Compston, J., Cooper, C., Stenmark, J., … Kanis, J. a. (2013). Osteoporosis in the European Union: medical management, epidemiology and economic burden. Archives of Osteoporosis, 8(1–2), 136. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11657-013-0136-1

Janssen, H. C. J. P., Samson, M. M., & Verhaar, H. J. J. (2002). Vitamin D deficiency, muscle function, and falls in elderly people. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 75(4), 611–5. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916748

Masterjohn, C. (2007). Vitamin D toxicity redefined: Vitamin K and the molecular mechanism. Medical Hypotheses, 68(5), 1026–1034. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2006.09.051

Peat, R. (1999). Thyroid Therapies, Confusion and Fraud. Retrieved from www.raypeat.com/articles/articles/thyroid.shtml

Prior, J. C. (1990). Progesterone as a bone-trophic hormone. Endocrine Reviews, 11(2), 386–398. http://doi.org/10.1210/edrv-11-2-386

Watts, N. B., Adler, R. A., Bilezikian, J. P., Drake, M. T., Eastell, R., Orwoll, E. S., & Finkelstein, J. S. (2012). Osteoporosis in men: an Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 97(6), 1802–1822. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-3045