stress

Is testosterone replacement therapy necessary?

In a world where it is increasingly normal to be convinced that we fall into a risk classification, need a treatment and can convince our doctor accordingly, negating any experience that he or she might have. The marketeers and economists that run pharmaceutical companies are doing a great job of increasing profits. Before we keep looking for the next wonder treatment we should take stock of what food and exercise can do.

Testosterone can be increased by some very simple strategies such as:

  1. Having adequate liver and vitamin A in the diet to assist in the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone - the base hormone responsible for production of testosterone and other androgens.

  2. Ensuring that adequate energy and thyroid hormone are available to maintain communication of the hypothalamic- pituitary- (signalling centres for hormone production-brain to testicles) gonadal axis.

  3. Understanding stress, sleep and interactions between excesses of estrogen and their impact on testosterone production.

  4. Less understood but increasingly keeping mobile communication devices out of pockets and bags that are close to reproductive tissue, including females (ovaries, endometrium etc), appears to be a pragmatic approach in the future. Steroid producing tissues have increased production of problematic compounds that may be prone to damage.

Here's some of the technical aspects to the situation that are taken from a recent assignment as part of my masters degree..

Introduction

Testosterone is a hormone found in both males and females but is the major reproductive hormone in men that also has a variety of other beneficial functions for maintaining physical and psychological aspects to health. Testosterone levels may decrease with disease and/or be part of an age related decline of output. The use of testosterone supplementation has increased substantially in recent years counter these states, primarily due to increased marketing as an agent of change for energy, strength, fat loss and sexual function. Whilst its use appears beneficial in some areas, caution has been recommended on the effects of T supplementation use and it’s effects on the cardiovascular system.

 Diagnosis

Testosterone (T) is the most important androgen found in males and produced primarily within the testes, when low it is defined as hypogonadism. Hypogonadism is classified as either primary, derived from the testes or secondary, which involves the hypothalamus, pituitary or derived from illness or disease. A low serum testosterone (<300ng/dL) is suggestive, but not definitive of hypogonadism and measurements of luteinising (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is used to establish a primary or secondary diagnosis (Crawford & Kennedy, 2016). A worry trend is that despite striking increases of testosterone prescription a substantial amount (approximately 29% in this review) of patients often fail to have their levels checked prior to undertaking testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). (Corona G, Rastrelli, Maseroli, Sforza, & Maggi, 2015). Additionally only 45 % had their testosterone levels checked during or post TRT intervention.

Low testosterone and cardiovascular risk

Previous studies have highlighted an increase in all cause mortality associated with low testosterone levels in men (Araujo et al., 2011). Conditions that increase risk of mortality related to low testosterone are increased abdominal obesity, inflammatory biomarkers, dyslipidaemia, diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However the diagnosis of an isolated low testosterone level should be qualified by ruling out other potential diagnosis such as long-term illness, nutritional deficiencies and other endocrine issues such as subclinical or overt hypothyroidism.

Testosterone supplementation and risks

A number of studies and meta analysis have demonstrated a number of beneficial effects of TRT which extend to increased sexual satisfaction, muscle mass, strength mood and metabolic function (Corona G et al., 2015) (Gagliano-Jucá & Basaria, 2017). However the suggested risk to increased CV adverse events have appeared vague in many studies and previous extrapolations/anecdotes between men having increased levels of testosterone (and therefore increased cardiac risk) and females having less testosterone and more oestrogen were not just problematic but incorrect. Many studies have correlated low testosterone to low biomarkers of health and increased cardiovascular disease (Pastuszak, Kohn, Estis, & Lipshultz, 2017) (Kloner, Carson, Dobs, Kopecky, & Mohler, 2016).

TRT reductionism and treating symptoms

A comprehensive review of the data compiled by Oskui et al (Mesbah Oskui, P., French, W.J., Herring, 2013) described the major CV implications of TRT which can be observed below. The authors draw attention to previously conducted studies, that did not show any relationships between low levels of testosterone and CV risk and suggest that both the subfraction of testosterone (Total T compared to Free T) and method of analysis for CVD were inappropriate and therefore unreliable for inclusion. 

Cardiovascular analysis Studies Major findings Association between T and mortality 8 8/8 studies found relationship between low T and increased all cause and CV mortality. Type 2 DM 6 6/6 studies showed improved insulin sensitivity through HOMA-IR/HgA!c and improved blood glucose Cholesterol 3 2/3 studies found no change to LDL/HDL from TRT Markers of inflammation (primarily C reactive protein CRP) 8 4/8 studies found reduced CRP Intima media thickness 8 8/8 found an inverse relationship between low T and IMT

The above studies reviewed by the authors, established a link between low levels of testosterone and increases in mortality (all cause and CV), insulin sensitivity and increases in intima media thickness that are resolved by TRT. Yet markers for lipids and inflammation markers such as CRP are less convincing. Hypothyroidism is related to low testosterone and hypogonadic states mainly through hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction. Treatment of hypothyroid and subclinical hypothyroid states also resolves low testosterone and hypogonadic states, decreases intima media thickness, improves insulin sensitivity and decreases lipid levels (Crawford & Kennedy, 2016), (Krassas, Poppe, & Glinoer, 2010),(Donnelly & White, 2000) (Gao, Zhang, Zhang, Yang, & Chen, 2013). Is TRT the correct therapy for many males, given a) the rapid increases in often undiagnosed and prescription and b) when hypogonadic states, that have similar (cardiac) manifestations and are improved beyond the effects of TRT, are resolved with thyroid hormone?

Another factor concerning reliability of the studies used in previous meta analysis is the size to determine true risk between CV adverse events and TRT (Onasanya et al., 2016). The authors suggesting that to achieve a two-sided p value of 0.05 and power of 80% some 17664 participants would need to study to clarify any relationship. Observational data conducted over 5 years suggested that control groups treated with testosterone in short term had a lower mortality (HR 0.88 95 % CI 0:84 - 0.93) than controls (Wallis et al., 2016). From the meta analysis and other studies discussed above both age (>65) and predisposition to existing disease states may indicate the likelihood of adverse CV events when treated with TRT.

Another draw back of meta-analysis is the inclusion of data and bias produced by pharmaceutical companies that may not be adequately reflected or assessed. Much like cardiovascular end point studies being scarce. Testosterone studies that are funded by financial interests are usually in place to validate the benefits of TRT and fail to evaluate CV adverse events as end points. The increased adequate sample size needed to validate the safety and efficacy of this treatment often increase cost and decrease profit margin over time. The many studies that have been conducted so far, show much smaller sample sizes and a wide range of TRT delivery and dosing.

In a recent case crossover analysis that is not included in any current meta analysis, Layton et al (Layton et al., 2018) found a unique association between testosterone injections and short term cardio (and cerebrovascular) events in older men. Increased associations with myocardial infarction and stroke, post testosterone injection showed odds ratio (OR) were increased for all outcomes, OR =1.45 (95%: CI 1.07, 1.98).

Summary

Testosterone replacement does appear to have many positive effects on a number of markers related to cardiovascular health which include sexual performance, increased muscle mass, metabolic health, physical performance and decreasing mortality in a younger population. However, despite the many benefits of TRT the use of this therapy may have significant risk in late onset hypogonadal states, in ages >65 years of age, those susceptible to conditions associated with erythrocytosis and an association with acute cardiac events exists. It remains essential to ensure that not only adequate analysis of hypogonadal states are present but to ascertain if low testosterone levels are merely a symptom of other endocrine disturbances, such as hypothyroidism which has striking similarities to low levels of testosterone.

Want some more free resources on hormones?

References:

1.Araujo, A. B., Dixon, J. M., Suarez, E. a, Murad, M. H., Guey, L. T., & Wittert, G. a. (2011). Clinical review: Endogenous testosterone and mortality in men: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 96(10), 3007–19. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2011-1137

2.Basaria, S., Davda, M. N., Travison, T. G., Ulloor, J., Singh, R., & Bhasin, S. (2013). Risk Factors Associated with Cardiovascular Events During Testosterone Administration in Older Men with Mobility Limitation. The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, 68(2), 153–60. http://doi.org/10.1093/gerona/gls138

  1. Corona G, G., Rastrelli, G., Maseroli, E., Sforza, A., & Maggi, M. (2015). Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk: A Review. The World Journal of Men’s Health, 33(3), 130–42. http://doi.org/10.5534/wjmh.2015.33.3.130

  2. Crawford, M., & Kennedy, L. (2016). Testosterone replacement therapy: role of pituitary and thyroid in diagnosis and treatment. Translational Andrology and Urology, 5(6), 850–858. http://doi.org/10.21037/tau.2016.09.01

  3. Donnelly, P., & White, C. (2000). Testicular dysfunction in men with primary hypothyroidism; Reversal of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with replacement thyroxine. Clinical Endocrinology, 52(2), 197–201. http://doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2265.2000.00918.x

  4. Gagliano-Jucá, T., & Basaria, S. (2017). Trials of testosterone replacement reporting cardiovascular adverse events. Asian Journal of Andrology, 19(May), 1–7. http://doi.org/10.4103/aja.aja

  5. Gao, N., Zhang, W., Zhang, Y., Yang, Q., & Chen, S. (2013). Carotid intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism: A meta-analysis. Atherosclerosis, 227(1), 18–25. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2012.10.070

  6. Kloner, R. A., Carson, C., Dobs, A., Kopecky, S., & Mohler, E. R. (2016). Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jacc.2015.12.005

  7. Krassas, G. E., Poppe, K., & Glinoer, D. (2010). Thyroid Function and Human Reproductive Health. Endocrine Reviews, 31(5), 702–755. http://doi.org/10.1210/er.2009-0041

  8. Layton, J. B., Li, D., Meier, C. R., Sharpless, J. L., Stürmer, T., & Brookhart, M. A. (2018). Injection testosterone and adverse cardiovascular events: A case-crossover analysis. Clinical Endocrinology. http://doi.org/10.1111/cen.13574

  9. Mesbah Oskui, P., French, W.J., Herring, M. J. et al. (2013). Testosterone and the Cardiovascular System: A comprehensive Review of the Clinical Literature. Journal of the American Heart Association. http://doi.org/10.1161/JAHA.113.000272

  10. Onasanya, O., Iyer, G., Lucas, E., Lin, D., Singh, S., & Alexander, G. C. (2016). Association between exogenous testosterone and cardiovascular events: an overview of systematic reviews. The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(16)30215-7

  11. Pastuszak, A. W., Kohn, T. P., Estis, J., & Lipshultz, L. I. (2017). Low Plasma Testosterone Is Associated With Elevated Cardiovascular Disease Biomarkers. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 14(9), 1095–1103. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsxm.2017.06.015

  12. Roos, A., Bakker, S. J. L., Links, T. P., Gans, R. O. B., & Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R. (2007). Thyroid function is associated with components of the metabolic syndrome in euthyroid subjects. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 92(2), 491–6. http://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2006-1718

  13. Udovcic, M., Pena, R. H., Patham, B., Tabatabai, L., & Kansara, A. (2017). Hypothyroidism and the Heart. Methodist DeBakey Cardiovascular Journal, 13(2), 55–59. http://doi.org/10.14797/mdcj-13-2-55

  14. Wallis, C. J. D., Lo, K., Lee, Y., Krakowsky, Y., Garbens, A., Satkunasivam, R., … Nam, R. K. (2016). Survival and cardiovascular events in men treated with testosterone replacement therapy: an intention-to-treat observational cohort study. The Lancet. Diabetes & Endocrinology, 4(6), 498–506. http://doi.org/10.1016/S2213-8587(16)00112-1

  15. Xu, L., Freeman, G., Cowling, B. J., & Schooling, C. M. (2013). Testosterone therapy and cardiovascular events among men: A systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled randomized trials. BMC Medicine, 11(1). http://doi.org/10.1186/1741-7015-11-108

 

Being holistic versus (holistic) critical thinking.

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Is being 'holistic' an advantage to holistic critical thinking? It’s relatively easy to get drawn into a naturalistic fallacy of consuming all foods in their most raw natural state. Perhaps you’re someone who went from a fast food diet, where you didn’t feel your best, to consuming more whole foods, fresh fruit and vegetables? It’s easy to see how a switch and positive changes can occur in the short term. The next step is to start preaching to the masses how sugar is bad, how your life will be saved with green smoothies, nuts, seeds and coffee butt cleanses. For the record this is a waste of coffee and not to far from what I was preaching a decade ago. So what does it mean to be holistic?There’s a large movement within the health fitness and wellness industry (and lay people) that are drawn to  'holistic' thinking, and their definition is often enforced by the fallacy that everything in its most natural state is better for human health. This appears to include foods like nut milks (yes you can milk a nut), kale smoothies, seed oils like flax and undercooked broccoli and other greens, despite their negative effects on human health when consumed in substantial amounts. It’s a religion, and much like religion and with this mind-set it isn’t going to make you any healthier. I’ll make reference here to the late, great Beastie Boy, MCA who despite being a vegan and a Buddhist died far too early from throat cancer.

It is true that eating plenty of foods in their most natural state f(or some foods) can be important for health. But the image on the right highlights the faulty narrative of being holistic without thinking about the consequences. Fruits, vegetables, dairy products, meats and the like require minimal processing but in the quest for longevity, taste and profit, adding preservatives and flavour enhancers causes our food sources to become problematic. The so called ‘holistic’ folk get lost in this narrative urging your diet to become abundant in the rawest, greenest and brownest foods, that are most indigestible and contain potent inhibitors of biological function.

To integrate a level of holism into nutrition and function requires a level of critical thinking. What do these foods contain? How do they affect physiology? It’s well known that the brassica vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower and sprouts contain potent compounds that decrease energy output. These goitregens inhibit thyroid output and isothiocyanates found in cruciferous vegetables affects TPO or thyroid peroxidase, both of which are exacerbated when iodine uptake or restriction is present. Research tends to support these problematic effects (Choi & Kim, 2014)(Truong, Baron-Dubourdieu, Rougier, & Guénel, 2010), but much attention is focused on the smaller compounds that seem to work well in test tubes, rather than its global effects. As the environment becomes more stressful for biology do we need more building or reducing factors within our control?

The environment can be a harsh place. There are plenty of pollutants that have a negative effect on fertility, metabolism and other key endocrine aspects of health, some of which are industrial, others purposively added to food (arguably another form of industry) (Rajpert-De Meyts, Skakkebaek, & Toppari, 2000)(Upson, Harmon, & Baird, 2016). We can argue that the environment has always been a harsh place and adaptation has taken place as a response to selective pressures at the heart of evolution. Yet currently we are heading towards a tipping point, as environmental stimulants appear to be at the heart of acquired biological damage that is inherited by offspring. Cancer, fertility and other metabolic diseases are more common than ever and yet the approach is to keep seeking the magic bullet to ameliorate the fate that awaits many of us.

If we were to ask:

What enhances biological function, makes us more robust and allows us to have a stronger conversation with a stressful environment?

Rather than succumb to its stressors.

The highway to health

The highway to health

A biological system in its best working order could be represented, as an infinite road stretching into the  distance, perhaps with the odd bump along the way or a slight deviation but an ability to get back on track is available. Compare that to the inhibitory T-junction where the body cannot function as the clear straight road, it deviates from its true organised direction. The journey is laboured and restrictive. The ability to flux and respond to stressors is key and adequate energy is an essential component of reorganisation.

Nutrition is an important factor for such conversations with the environment. Eating a diet that is dominated with foods that are difficult to digest, decrease energy availability and create more stress are not going to make chatting any easier. If we make the effort to understand what keeps a cell and its mitochondria functioning at its most efficient state, we can understand why aspects such as sugar, adequate protein, moderate exercise, light and other factors, can play a role in overcoming current stimulus that decrease function and increase disease states.

The following article is definitely worth a read for an understanding of the concepts that I have talked about. http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/vegetables.shtm

References:

Choi, W. J., & Kim, J. (2014). Dietary factors and the risk of thyroid cancer: a review. Clinical Nutrition Research, 3(2), 75–88. http://doi.org/10.7762/cnr.2014.3.2.75

Rajpert-De Meyts, E., Skakkebaek, N. E., & Toppari, J. (2000). Testicular Cancer Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Endocrine Aspects. Endotext. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25905224

Truong, T., Baron-Dubourdieu, D., Rougier, Y., & Guénel, P. (2010). Role of dietary iodine and cruciferous vegetables in thyroid cancer: A countrywide case-control study in New Caledonia. Cancer Causes and Control, 21(8), 1183–1192. http://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-010-9545-2

Upson, K., Harmon, Q. E., & Baird, D. D. (2016). Soy-based infant formula feeding and ultrasound-detected uterine fibroids among young African-American women with no prior clinical diagnosis of fibroids. Environmental Health Perspectives, 124(6), 769–775. http://doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510082

Calcium- Don't ditch the dairy.

Calcium - don’t ditch the dairy. Like every nutrient that we have consumed over the last millennia or ten, there are reasons why some foods appear more beneficial than others. Using poor tests like Igg4 sensitivity/allergy analysis many ‘experts’ have convinced us that one of our most potent foods is causing us more harm than good. I am on the bandwagon that as far as my food goes (meat and dairy) grass fed, free range and organic remain a better choice for all concerned. Hormesis can only take us so far when it comes to pesticide and pollutant exposure and the individuality of tolerance and adaptation remains a knife-edge for many.

Don't ditch the dairy

Without getting into the arguments of which type of cows produce what compounds. This topic is merely aimed at why people have issues with calcium uptake and is the problem really a dairy issue?

Many people who have had blood tests are often told to take extra calcium supplements in response to presenting with low serum calcium. However the issue of lowered calcium in the blood may have nothing to do with the amount of calcium that they are ingesting. Here are some potential mechanisms:

• Low levels of vitamin D: Vitamin D is a well-known nutrient/hormone like substance that allows for the adequate uptake of calcium into bones and teeth. amongst many other functions which include immune system function. (This synergistic relationship can be observed in reverse also) • High phosphorus/phosphate diet. In addition to the added phosphates to foods and crops. Current recommendations suggest increasing portions of grains, beans and peas, which not only contain phosphates but also contain phytates, which can block mineral uptake. Low magnesium is also an issue. • Increased estrogens and xenoestrogens that increase the stress response and cause calcium to leach from the bones into soft tissues. A decrease in available progesterone can decrease bone density. • Poor reabsorption factors such as low intake of vitamin K2 • An actual calcium deficiency from low calcium intake • Excessive exercise which can be due to inadequate calcium and poor carbon dioxide retention. • Inability to absorb calcium from the digestive tract, low stomach acid levels/hypochlorhydria and damage to villi/intestinal lining, which can be observed in celiac but increasingly with intestinal hyper-permeability, endotoxin and chemical induced damage. • Decreased blood albumin levels which bind calcium. Digestion and dehydration issues mainly. • Regulation of PTH or parathyroid hormone.

Osteoporosis is on the rise but its increasing prevalence is not due to low calcium intakes but due to many complex interactions, between stress, pollutants, low sunlight exposure, excessive exercise and nutrient levels. The common reductionist approach is to throw the same nutrient at the problem in larger amounts and hope that this so called ‘deficiency’ is corrected.

It's worth noting that elevated serotonin levels in the blood are responsible for bone less. An increase in serotonin  can be viewed with both a temporary spasticity of smooth muscles tissues and loose or watery stools. The role of serotonin is to increase evacuation of the bowel, mediated by an increase in its production from the entero chromaffin cells in the digestive tract, where some 95% of the bodies own supply is created. A diet high in nuts and seeds, which contain serotonin are likely to irritate the digestive tract. From an evolutionary survival perspective, this allows for seeds to be passed out from the bowel without being digested, ensuring plants survival. Increased aggression and irritability have been noted in elevated serotonin levels, which also correlates with a decrease in bone density. Ensuring adequate calcium in the diet during these times is therefore essential.

When phosphorus increases and there is a lack of vitamin D, PTH increases to balance out the need for increased calcium, which is taken from bones and teeth. In essence much of the calcification of arteries and soft tissues can be attributed to this situation. Some of the signs that can be observed with low calcium levels are:

• Muscle cramps • Nose bleeds • Soft fingernails • Frequent cold sores, rashes • High or low blood pressure • Irritability • Fevers with mild colds

Administering calcium supplements to those with calcium deficiency is much like talking over someone before they have a chance to speak. You only here there initial words but fail to here what they are truly saying.

Much of the marketing and sales of supplements these days are suggestive that our food does not give us the nutrients that we need and that we need to stay plugged in to the rattle of supplement bottles opening daily. When in fact if we just strive to improve digestion and cofactor optimisation this simply isn’t the case. In the case of dairy, when we flippantly talk about super foods, when you look at the nutrients provided from dairy, it is indeed a food with plenty to say for itself, particularly in the situations of growth, stability and anti-stress.

References:

1. Christodoulou, S. , Goula, T., Ververidis, A., and Drosos, G. Vitamin D and Bone Disease. Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 396541, http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/396541 2. Weatherby, D. Blood Chemistry Analysis. Bear Mountain Publishing. 2002.

Online:

http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/phosphate-activation-aging.shtml

Is your diet and exercise program working for you?

Health, fitness and well-being are words that are often used interchangeably but more often than not fail to reflect the differences inherent in each person. Exercise, stress and diet are three components of wellbeing that are often grossly misunderstood not only is yourby the general public but by fitness professionals themselves. Companies wanting to sell products that supposedly enhance our well-being have largely driven our concept of health and of what it takes to achieve maximal health. Let’s take diet for example; the current trend is that we should eat foods such as raw green vegetables, drink plenty of water and try to eat less calories than we expend, usually supplemented with a fancy antioxidant that does what no other supplement currently does on the market. Exercise guidelines encourage us to exercise at least every day and in particular cardiovascular exercise is touted as the exercise that will help you lose weight and prevent heart disease. Why is this unhealthy?

This approach may work with a number of people initially, especially with those who have been liberal with eating and drinking and exposure to limited exercise. The long term effect is an increasing number people who have a cold nose, hands and feet, low body temperature (below 36 degrees when the norm should be 37), poor energy, sleep, libido, digestive function, as well as mood swings usually dominated by poor adrenal regulation; and, ultimately, thyroid regulation. In fact one of the many flaws with the current recommendations with exercise guidelines is that it is most likely poor thyroid function that will contribute to elevated cholesterol levels (which is a protective response) and potential cardiovascular events, not a lack of exercise.

 Too much of a good thing?

Excessive exercise and malnutrition can also play havoc with the adrenal glands. Fatigue can also be linked to hypocortisolemia. Under and over production of the stress/anti-inflammatory hormone cortisol is well documented. Ever felt that fatigue early in the morning and inability to get out of bed? ‘But I eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly’ you say? The adrenals are responsible for getting our butt moving and are synergistic with other key glands, such as the thyroid, and have an impact on digestion, healing, blood sugar regulation and many other functions. The common approach to too much or too little cortisol production is adaptogenic herbs, such as Ashwaganda, Rhodiola and many others. However balancing stress responses with appropriate nutrition and a well-designed exercise and rest program can alleviate these issues without rattling as your walk down the street with your daily dose of supplements.

Food for thought

Nutrition and eating to support your own body function was inherently about consuming enough calories to keep us alive throughout history. Our body is geared towards consuming calories and exercise based upon energy being available. Today’s culture is about working more and eating less but it just isn’t working for everyone. If the so-called Paleo approach was right, do you think we would have been scurrying around for a head of broccoli and calorie-poor foods, or looking for food that would have given us more bang for the buck like a wild boar and liberal use of fruits and calorie dense foods? The human genome hasn’t changed that much, so the way we function as organisms will not change radically for some time either.

The big question

So what is the right approach? Well there really is no ideal approach; it’s what works for you. Exercise and nutrition are stressors and have the potential to be positive or negative but how does it affect you? Ask yourself these questions and you should have the answer to either continuing or cessation with your current methodologies.

  1. Do I feel fatigued?
  2.  Do I sleep well?
  3. Good bowel movement once or twice per day?
  4. What’s my libido like?
  5. Is my skin clear
  6. Do I keep getting injured?
  7. Have I lost weight with my plan if that’s what is needed?

You probably already know the answers to these questions; any program that supports energetic processes doesn’t create injury and improves repair processes, such as sleep, is always what we want and you are bound to be doing that right? Unfortunately we mistake the buzz and excitement, release of stress hormones and pumped up music of the group exercise classes, destructive boot camps, cross fit and other over exercise methodologies as healthy. When clients come to me in a state of injury and fatigue they often say to me ‘but I don’t feel like I am doing anything unless I am wringing with sweat and red in the face.’  The fact that their movement is compromised, posture and energy are poor, and re-training the thought process on what is health and balance is the first part of the rehabilitation program. The problem is that we still don’t know what optimal health is; we just work along patterns that appear to be healthy.

Burn baby burn

One of the common misconceptions of health is that you need low levels of body fat and a six-pack to be healthy. This couldn’t be further from the truth. Many people who engage in excessive exercise regimes often take vast amounts of antioxidants in an attempt to combat the wear and tear of these programs.  An observation to be made in the future is will these people live longer than people who engage in a more balanced lifestyle? Many people who lived into their hundreds did not engage in excessive exercise routines and some of these never even drank water on its own, simply drinking tea and juices. The advice that comes from many professionals becomes flawed as we try to apply modern blanket nutrition approaches to the masses. Don’t get me wrong, certain foods can bring about changes to certain conditions and we certainly need water on some level, but for many the modern healthy diet isn’t doing everyone the good it should.

 The environmental factor

One other thing not discussed by many leading health and fitness bodies is the concept of environmental issues on the body. Your environment has the capacity to make or break any fitness or nutrition program. Toxins are ubiquitous and there is not one environment in the world that hasn’t been touched by PCBs, dioxins and PETs amongst hundreds of thousands of other chemicals. Food, water and the air we breathe may have a more significant impact on our ability to stay healthy. Your nutrition and exercise plan may become a sideshow to the inflammatory genes that are expressed when exposed to these estrogenic issues to both male and females.  Obesity and diabetes are now being linked to these issues.

Is more exercise and fewer calories a good idea to those that have less capacity to deal with these toxins than others? Probably not.

A balancing act

That’s not to say that you can’t assist your body towards balance, they key point here is to be aware that your environment may be responsible for many areas that you haven’t achieved with exercise and food. Manage your environment by decreasing infamous chemicals, found in perfumes, GM foods and even wireless technology can lead to great success with less exercise and less calorie restriction.

Ultimately life is about balance and finding your balance may not be the same as another person. Breathing correctly, flexibility, stability and strength may be what your body needs the most. Spending countless hours doing repetitive cardiovascular exercises, restricting calories or pushing your body to get down to low levels of body fat is not how your body perceives balance. Finding your own ideal diet may take time but in the end, time is on your side.